Susannah Eddleman1

F, b. 9 February 1803, d. between 1861 and 1870
FatherPeter Eddleman1 b. 15 Sep 1762, d. 1808
MotherElizabeth Cruse1 b. 7 Mar 1776, d. 18 Feb 1866
     Susannah Eddleman was born on 9 February 1803 at Rowan County, North Carolina.2 She was a witness appointed guardian of Betsy, Sally, and Susan Eddlman 2 Aug 1808, Rowan County NC with Peter Eddleman in 1808 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 She married Henry Ludwick at Cabarrus County, North Carolina, on 29 May 1819.3 Her married name was Ludwick.1 Susannah Eddleman died between 1861 and 1870 at Smith County, Mississippi; A Henry Eddleman marries Catherine Sandeford 23 Dec 1867 Leake MS - perhaps this is "our" Henry and Susannah died before 1867 (Gary Rolph Apr 2014.)4

Family

Henry Ludwick b. 27 Aug 1800, d. 20 Aug 1871

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 16/485.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, North Carolina Marriage Bonds 1741-1868 about Henry Ludwick.
  4. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com.

Frank Lyczewski1

M, b. circa 1897, d. 17 September 1985
     Frank Lyczewski was born circa 1897 at South Dakota.2 He married Kathrina Zimmerman at Hillsville, McPherson County, South Dakota, in 1919.1 Frank Lyczewski died on 17 September 1985 at Prosser, Benton County, Washington.3

Family

Kathrina Zimmerman b. c 1900, d. 27 May 1990
Child

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S53] 1930 census, online www.ancestry.com, FrankLyczewski.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Frank Lyczewski in the Washington Death Index, 1940-2014.

Kathrina Zimmerman1

F, b. circa 1900, d. 27 May 1990
     Kathrina Zimmerman was born circa 1900 at South Dakota.2 Her married name was Lyczewski.1 She married Frank Lyczewski at Hillsville, McPherson County, South Dakota, in 1919.1 Kathrina Zimmerman died on 27 May 1990 at Prosser, Benton County, Washington.3

Family

Frank Lyczewski b. c 1897, d. 17 Sep 1985
Child

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S53] 1930 census, online www.ancestry.com, FrankLyczewski.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Kathrina Lyczewski in the Washington Death Index, 1940-2014.

Caleb Monroe Lyerly1

M, b. 17 July 1820, d. 21 May 1884
     Lyerle, Caleb M--farmer, was born 17 Jul 1820 in NC the s/o John ; Susanna (Walker). His grandfather was Christopher Lyerle. John was married twice in NC. His 1st wife died having 3 children--3 boys who are deceased and one girl, Nancy. John ; Susanna had 5 children: Caleb, Daniel, John, Isaac and Polly Ann (dead). Caleb married Catherine Hileman (b 10 May 1821 and died Dec 1875. She had 6 children: Elizabeth, Louisa, Sarah, Malinda, Lucinda and Matilda. Caleb married a 2nd time to Mary E (Meisenheimer) Humphries, the d/o Alfred and Betsey (Weaver). She is the mother of 3 children: Martha and Cynthia Ann Humphries, Alfred M Lyerle.2 Caleb Monroe Lyerly was also known as Caleb Lyerle.3 He was born on 17 July 1820 at Rowan County, North Carolina.4 He married Catherine Hileman, daughter of Peter Franklin Hileman and Susannah Miller, on 12 May 1841 at Union County, Illinois.5 Caleb Monroe Lyerly was also known as Caleb M. Lyerle.3 Caleb was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Misenheimer Precinct, Union County, Illinois. 59 48 Lyerly Caleb M 50 male white do [farmer] 12000 800 NC male over 21; Catherine 49 female IL cannot read write; Laura 21 female white IL cannot read write; Martha 18 female white IL attending school; Mary 10 female white IL attending school; Sharp William 20 male white farmer IL cannot read write; Samuel 22 male white farmer IL attending school.6 He married Mary Emeline Meisenheimer, daughter of Alfred Nelson Misenheimer and Anna Elizabeth Weaver, on 2 April 1876 at Union County, Illinois.5 Caleb was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 117, Misenheimer Precinct, Union County, Illinois. 105 105 Leyerle Caleb M white male 60 married farmer well NC NC NC; Mary E white female 35 wife married housekeeper well IL IL IL; Humphrey Martha J white female 14 daughter single at home well attending school IL TN IL; Cynthia A white female 12 single at home well attending school IL TN IL; Lyerle Alfred M white male 3 son single at home well IL NC IL; Evans Francis L servant white male 17 single works on farm well KY KY KY.7 He died on 21 May 1884 at Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois, at age 63.5

Family 1

Catherine Hileman b. 10 May 1821, d. 21 Dec 1875

Family 2

Mary Emeline Meisenheimer b. 15 Jan 1845, d. bt 1904 - 1910
Child

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
  2. [S810] Union County Illinois Biographies, online http://www.iltrails.org/Union/ucmisc_bios.htm
  3. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  6. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Caleb M Lyerly Estimated birth year: abt 1820 Age in 1870: 50 Birthplace: North Carolina Home in 1870: Misenheimer, Union, Illinois Family and neighbors: View Results Race: White Gender: Male Value of real estate: View image Post Office: Jonesboro.
  7. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Calleb M. Leyerle Home in 1880: Misenheimer, Union, Illinois Age: 60 Estimated birth year: abt 1820 Birthplace: North Carolina Relation to head-of-household: Self (Head) Spouse's name: Mary E. Father's birthplace: NC Mother's birthplace: NC Neighbors: View others on page Occupation: Farmer Marital Status: Married Race: White Gender: Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    
    View image Household Members:
    Name
    Age

    Calleb M. Leyerle
    60

    Mary E. Leyerle
    35

    Marthy Humphry
    14

    Cynthia A. Humphry
    12

    Alfred M. Leyerle
    3

    Francis L. Evans
    17

    Benjamin Lovell
    22.

Alfred M. Lyerle1

M, b. 1877
FatherCaleb Monroe Lyerly1 b. 17 Jul 1820, d. 21 May 1884
MotherMary Emeline Meisenheimer1 b. 15 Jan 1845, d. bt 1904 - 1910
     Alfred M. Lyerle was born in 1877 at Illinois; 3 IL 1880 census.2 Alfred was listed as a son in Caleb M. Lyerle's household on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 117, Misenheimer Precinct, Union County, Illinois; 105 105 Leyerle Caleb M white male 60 married farmer well NC NC NC; Mary E white female 35 wife married housekeeper well IL IL IL; Humphrey Martha J white female 14 daughter single at home well attending school IL TN IL; Cynthia A white female 12 single at home well attending school IL TN IL; Lyerle Alfred M white male 3 son single at home well IL NC IL; Evans Francis L servant white male 17 single works on farm well KY KY KY.3 Alfred M. Lyerle died at Colorado.1

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Calleb M. Leyerle Home in 1880: Misenheimer, Union, Illinois Age: 60 Estimated birth year: abt 1820 Birthplace: North Carolina Relation to head-of-household: Self (Head) Spouse's name: Mary E. Father's birthplace: NC Mother's birthplace: NC Neighbors: View others on page Occupation: Farmer Marital Status: Married Race: White Gender: Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    
    View image Household Members:
    Name
    Age

    Calleb M. Leyerle
    60

    Mary E. Leyerle
    35

    Marthy Humphry
    14

    Cynthia A. Humphry
    12

    Alfred M. Leyerle
    3

    Francis L. Evans
    17

    Benjamin Lovell
    22.
  3. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Calleb M. Leyerle Home in 1880: Misenheimer, Union, Illinois Age: 60 Estimated birth year: abt 1820 Birthplace: North Carolina Relation to head-of-household: Self (Head) Spouse's name: Mary E. Father's birthplace: NC Mother's birthplace: NC Neighbors: View others on page Occupation: Farmer Marital Status: Married Race: White Gender: Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    
    View image Household Members:
    Name
    Age

    Calleb M. Leyerle
    60

    Mary E. Leyerle
    35

    Marthy Humphry
    14

    Cynthia A. Humphry
    12

    Alfred M. Leyerle
    3

    Francis L. Evans
    17

    Benjamin Lovell
    22.

Mary Emeline Meisenheimer1

F, b. 15 January 1845, d. between 1904 and 1910
FatherAlfred Nelson Misenheimer1 b. 20 Oct 1820, d. 13 Aug 1895
MotherAnna Elizabeth Weaver1 b. 22 Nov 1822, d. 3 Aug 1859
     Mary Emeline Meisenheimer was born on 15 January 1845 at Union County, Illinois.1 Anna, Mary and Jackson was listed as a household member living with Alfred Nelson Misenheimer on the 1850 Census at West part of District No 2, Union County, Illinois; 573 573 Alfred Meisenheimer 28 male farmer $100 IL
Elizabeth 25 female IL
Mary 6 female IL
Jackson 1 male IL
Washington Smith 13 male MO
neighbor David Meisenheimer 58 yo.2 Mary Emeline Meisenheimer married William Humphreys on 4 September 1865 at Union County, Illinois.3 Her married name was Humphreys.1 Mary, Martha and Cynthia was listed as a household member living with William Humphrey on the 1870 Census at Misenheimer Precinct, Union County, Illinois; 76 62 Humphrey William 25 male white do [farmer] 800 200 TN male over 21; Mary E 25 female white keeping house IL; M Jane 4 female white IL; C Alice 2 female white IL.4 She witnessed an unknown person 's death at Union County, Illinois, on 27 January 1876.3 Mary Emeline Meisenheimer married Caleb Monroe Lyerly on 2 April 1876 at Union County, Illinois.3 As of 2 April 1876,her married name was Lyerly.3 As of 2 April 1876,her married name was Lyerle.1 Mary was listed as Caleb M. Lyerle's wife on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 117, Misenheimer Precinct, Union County, Illinois; 105 105 Leyerle Caleb M white male 60 married farmer well NC NC NC; Mary E white female 35 wife married housekeeper well IL IL IL; Humphrey Martha J white female 14 daughter single at home well attending school IL TN IL; Cynthia A white female 12 single at home well attending school IL TN IL; Lyerle Alfred M white male 3 son single at home well IL NC IL; Evans Francis L servant white male 17 single works on farm well KY KY KY.5 Mary Emeline Meisenheimer was Name-Standard. She was Name-Standard. She died between 1904 and 1910 at Ridgway, Ouray County, Colorado.1,6

Family 1

William Humphreys b. 5 Sep 1844, d. 27 Jan 1876
Children

Family 2

Caleb Monroe Lyerly b. 17 Jul 1820, d. 21 May 1884
Child

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Census Record for Jackson Meisenheimer.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  4. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: William Humphrey Estimated birth year: abt 1845 Age in 1870: 25 Birthplace: Tennessee Home in 1870: Misenheimer, Union, Illinois Family and neighbors: View Results Race: White Gender: Male Value of real estate: View image Post Office: Jonesboro.
  5. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Calleb M. Leyerle Home in 1880: Misenheimer, Union, Illinois Age: 60 Estimated birth year: abt 1820 Birthplace: North Carolina Relation to head-of-household: Self (Head) Spouse's name: Mary E. Father's birthplace: NC Mother's birthplace: NC Neighbors: View others on page Occupation: Farmer Marital Status: Married Race: White Gender: Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    
    View image Household Members:
    Name
    Age

    Calleb M. Leyerle
    60

    Mary E. Leyerle
    35

    Marthy Humphry
    14

    Cynthia A. Humphry
    12

    Alfred M. Leyerle
    3

    Francis L. Evans
    17

    Benjamin Lovell
    22.

  6. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Green Family Tree.

Sarah Lindsey1

F, b. 31 March 1878, d. 13 August 1934
     Sarah Lindsey was born on 31 March 1878 at Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois.2 She was 12 ch.1 Her married name was Meisenheimer.1 As of 10 September 1899,her married name was Misenheimer.2 She married Henry A Misenheimer at Union, Union County, Illinois, on 10 September 1899.2 Sarah Lindsey died on 13 August 1934 at Reynoldsville, Union County, Illinois, at age 56.2

Family

Henry A Misenheimer b. 12 Sep 1874, d. 1 Oct 1944

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Johnson Family Tree.

Daniel Lyerly1

M, b. 1796, d. between 1861 and 1870
FatherZachariah (Zachary) Lyerly2 b. 2 Jun 1755, d. 15 May 1847
MotherCatherine Misenheimer2 b. 1758, d. 1791
     Daniel Lyerly was born in 1796 at North Carolina.3 He married Margaret Barger at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 27 March 1821.1 Daniel was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census at School District 17, Rowan County, North Carolina. 691 707 Daniel Lyerly 54 male farmer 4000 NC; Margaret 45 female NC cannot read write; Samuel 26 male farmer NC attending school; Joseph 20 male laborer NC attending school; Henry 18 male laborer NC attending school; Margaret 16 female NC attending school; Polly 14 female NC attending school; Nancy 12 female NC attending school.4 Daniel was listed as a neighbor of Jesse Lyerly on the 1850 Census at School District 17, Rowan County, North Carolina. 690 706 Jesse Lyerly 28 male farmer NC; Elizabeth 24 female NC; neighbor Daniel Lyerly.5 Daniel was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at County North of the North Carolina Railroad, Rowan County, North Carolina. 494 483 Danl Lyerly 64 male farmer 5748 2745 NC; Margaret 62 female NC; Polly 21 female NC attending school; Nancy 19 female NC attending school; Alexander 14 male NC attending school; neighbor Henry Lyerly 38 NC.6 He died between 1861 and 1870 at Rowan County, North Carolina; Margeret (assuming this is the right Margaret) is head of household in 1870 census.7

Family

Margaret Barger b. 31 Dec 1799, d. bt 1871 - 1880
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1 page 30/485.
  3. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.















































































































































  4. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.

























































































































































  5. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.





















































































































































  6. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Danl Lyerly
    Name:
    Danl Lyerly

    Age in 1860:
    64

    Birth Year:
    abt 1796

    Birthplace:
    North Carolina

    Home in 1860:
    County North of The NC Rr, Rowan, North Carolina

    Gender:
    Male

    Post Office:
    Salisbury

    Value of real estate:
    View Image

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Danl Lyerly
    64


    Margaret Lyerly
    62


    Polly Lyerly
    21


    Nancy Lyerly
    19


    Alexander Lyerly
    14


    Nathan Harrison
    44


    Elvira Harrison
    28


    John A D Harrison
    7


    Mary A Harrison
    4.

  7. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Margaret Lyerly
    Name:
    Margaret Lyerly

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1800

    Age in 1870:
    70

    Birthplace:
    North Carolina

    Home in 1870:
    Unity, Rowan, North Carolina

    Race:
    White

    Gender:
    Female

    Value of real estate:
    View Image

    Post Office:
    Salisbury

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Margaret Lyerly
    70


    Laura Lyerly
    13


    Johnathan Lyerly
    11.

  8. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.























































































































































  9. [S755] Barger Family History, online http://members.tripod.com/~suzid/FGS-10509.html, http://members.tripod.com/~suzid/georgehenry.html
  10. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.

















































































































































  11. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Danl Lyerly
    Name:
    Danl Lyerly

    Age in 1860:
    64

    Birth Year:
    abt 1796

    Birthplace:
    North Carolina

    Home in 1860:
    County North of The NC Rr, Rowan, North Carolina

    Gender:
    Male

    Post Office:
    Salisbury

    Value of real estate:
    View Image

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Danl Lyerly
    64


    Margaret Lyerly
    62


    Polly Lyerly
    21


    Nancy Lyerly
    19


    Alexander Lyerly
    14


    Nathan Harrison
    44


    Elvira Harrison
    28


    John A D Harrison
    7


    Mary A Harrison
    4.

Margaret Barger1

F, b. 31 December 1799, d. between 1871 and 1880
FatherJohn Barger1 b. 1768, d. c 1807
MotherMargaretha Cruse1 b. 6 Oct 1769, d. 10 Feb 1850
     Margaret Barger was born on 31 December 1799 at Rowan County, North Carolina.2 She was born in 1805 at North Carolina; 45 NC 1850 census.3 She married Daniel Lyerly at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 27 March 1821.1 Her married name was Lyerly.1 Margaret Barger lived; 1850, 1860 cen Rowan County, NC.1 Margaret, Samuel, Joseph, Henry, Margaret and Polly was listed as a household member living with Daniel Lyerly on the 1850 Census at School District 17, Rowan County, North Carolina; 691 707 Daniel Lyerly 54 male farmer 4000 NC; Margaret 45 female NC cannot read write; Samuel 26 male farmer NC attending school; Joseph 20 male laborer NC attending school; Henry 18 male laborer NC attending school; Margaret 16 female NC attending school; Polly 14 female NC attending school; Nancy 12 female NC attending school.4 Margaret, Polly, Nancy and Alexander was listed as a household member living with Daniel Lyerly in the 1860 Census at County North of the North Carolina Railroad, Rowan County, North Carolina; 494 483 Danl Lyerly 64 male farmer 5748 2745 NC; Margaret 62 female NC; Polly 21 female NC attending school; Nancy 19 female NC attending school; Alexander 14 male NC attending school; neighbor Henry Lyerly 38 NC.5 Margaret Barger died between 1871 and 1880 at Rowan County, North Carolina; in 1870 census; could not find in 1880 census (Gary Rolph May 2008.)6

Family

Daniel Lyerly b. 1796, d. bt 1861 - 1870
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 14/485.
  3. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.













































































































































  4. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.

























































































































































  5. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Danl Lyerly
    Name:
    Danl Lyerly

    Age in 1860:
    64

    Birth Year:
    abt 1796

    Birthplace:
    North Carolina

    Home in 1860:
    County North of The NC Rr, Rowan, North Carolina

    Gender:
    Male

    Post Office:
    Salisbury

    Value of real estate:
    View Image

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Danl Lyerly
    64


    Margaret Lyerly
    62


    Polly Lyerly
    21


    Nancy Lyerly
    19


    Alexander Lyerly
    14


    Nathan Harrison
    44


    Elvira Harrison
    28


    John A D Harrison
    7


    Mary A Harrison
    4.

  6. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Margaret Lyerly
    Name:
    Margaret Lyerly

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1800

    Age in 1870:
    70

    Birthplace:
    North Carolina

    Home in 1870:
    Unity, Rowan, North Carolina

    Race:
    White

    Gender:
    Female

    Value of real estate:
    View Image

    Post Office:
    Salisbury

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Margaret Lyerly
    70


    Laura Lyerly
    13


    Johnathan Lyerly
    11.
  7. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.























































































































































  8. [S755] Barger Family History, online http://members.tripod.com/~suzid/FGS-10509.html, http://members.tripod.com/~suzid/georgehenry.html
  9. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census
    about Daniel Lyerly
    Name:
    Daniel Lyerly
    View
    Original
    Record
    
    View original image


    Age:
    54


    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1796


    Birth Place:
    North Carolina


    Gender:
    Male


    Home in 1850(City,County,State):
    School District 17, Rowan, North Carolina


    Household Members:
    Name
    Age



    Daniel Lyerly
    54



    Henry Lyerly
    18



    Joseph Lyerly
    20



    Margaret Lyerly
    16



    Margaret Lyerly
    45



    Nancy Lyerly
    12



    Polly Lyerly
    14



    Samuel Lyerly
    26.

















































































































































  10. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Danl Lyerly
    Name:
    Danl Lyerly

    Age in 1860:
    64

    Birth Year:
    abt 1796

    Birthplace:
    North Carolina

    Home in 1860:
    County North of The NC Rr, Rowan, North Carolina

    Gender:
    Male

    Post Office:
    Salisbury

    Value of real estate:
    View Image

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Danl Lyerly
    64


    Margaret Lyerly
    62


    Polly Lyerly
    21


    Nancy Lyerly
    19


    Alexander Lyerly
    14


    Nathan Harrison
    44


    Elvira Harrison
    28


    John A D Harrison
    7


    Mary A Harrison
    4.

Edward Lyerly1

M, b. circa 1845, d. circa 1879
     Edward Lyerly was born circa 1845 at Iredell County, North Carolina.2 He married Susan Sapphire Lyerly at Rowan County, North Carolina, say 1865.1,2 Edward Lyerly died circa 1879 at Rowan County, North Carolina.2

Family

Susan Sapphire Lyerly b. 1844, d. c 1926

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, W S Delaney Family Tree.

Susan Sapphire Lyerly1

F, b. 1844, d. circa 1926
FatherJacob Lyerly Jr1 b. 1811, d. 1846
MotherMelinda Elizabeth Barber1 b. 1819, d. 1868
     Susan Sapphire Lyerly was born in 1844 at North Carolina.1 Margaretta, Harriett, Thomas, Susan and Catherine was listed as a household member living with Melinda Elizabeth Lyerly on the 1850 Census at School District No 46, Rowan County, North Carolina; 841 858 Elizabeth Lyerla [sic] 31 female NC; Margaret Lyerla 48 female NC; Catherine Lyerla 42 female NC; Harriet I Lyerla 11 female NC attending school; Thomas S. Lyerla 9 male NC attending school; Susan S. 5 female NC attending school.2 Susan Sapphire Lyerly lived; NC.1 She married Edward Lyerly at Rowan County, North Carolina, say 1865.1,3 Susan Sapphire Lyerly died circa 1926 at Rowan County, North Carolina.3

Family

Edward Lyerly b. c 1845, d. c 1879

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Elisabeth Lyerla Age: 31 Estimated birth year: abt 1819 Birth place: North Carolina Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): School District 46, Rowan, North Carolina Page: 164 Roll: M432_643.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, W S Delaney Family Tree.

George Mountford Lyerly1

M, b. 1818, d. 1908
FatherPeter Lyerly1 b. 1791, d. 6 Jan 1826
MotherMargaret Peggy Cresson1 b. 1792, d. 1872
     George Mountford Lyerly was born in 1818 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1,2 He married Nancy Charlotte (Ann) Graham on 11 January 1841 at Rowan County, North Carolina.2 George Mountford Lyerly married Jane Elizabeth Thompson in 1851 at North Carolina.1 George Mountford Lyerly lived; NC.1 He died in 1908 at North Carolina.1

Family 1

Nancy Charlotte (Ann) Graham b. c 1816, d. s 1850

Family 2

Jane Elizabeth Thompson b. 1816, d. bt 1852 - 1860

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Walker Williams.

Jane Elizabeth Thompson1,2

F, b. 1816, d. between 1852 and 1860
     Jane Elizabeth Thompson was born in 1816 at Rowan County, North Carolina.2 She married George Mountford Lyerly, son of Peter Lyerly and Margaret Peggy Cresson, in 1851 at North Carolina.1 Her married name was Lyerly.1 Jane Elizabeth Thompson died between 1852 and 1860 at Rowan County, North Carolina.

Family

George Mountford Lyerly b. 1818, d. 1908

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Sousa Family Tree.

Elizabeth C Brown1

F, b. 15 May 1820, d. 13 January 1857
     Elizabeth C Brown was also known as Nancy Ann Charlotte Graham.2 She was born on 15 May 1820 at Rowan County, North Carolina.2,1 She married George H Washington Lyerly at North Carolina on 11 January 1841.2,3 Her married name was Lyerly.2 Elizabeth C Brown lived; NC.2 Elizabeth died on 13 January 1857 at Rowan County, North Carolina, at age 36.2

Family

George H Washington Lyerly b. 14 Nov 1819, d. 26 May 1893
Children

Citations

  1. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Elizabeth C Brown Lyerly.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, George Lyerly.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Sousa Family Tree.

Dewalt Lentz Sr1,2

M, b. 26 June 1766, d. between 1831 and 1840
FatherJohann Sebastian Lentz3 b. 26 Aug 1735, d. 3 May 1808
MotherAnna Margaretha Bechtel3 b. c 1737, d. s 1824
     Dewalt Lentz Sr Personal History of Dewalt Lentz (B4-)

B4- Dewalt Lentz. His name is spelled both ways--as Devault (pronounced 'Defalt' in German) and as Dewalt (pronounced Devalt). You sometimes see 'Duvall' used for his name in IL.

He was born 26 Jun 1766 and baptized 20 Jul 1766, sponsors: D-Dewalt Lentz (his uncle, unmarried) and Maria Kleinin ('in' added to indicate an unmarried woman.)

An incomplete marriage record in the Rowan records, p 257, shows Dauvlt Lentz, German, m. ________, on______--179___. bondsman:_____Lentz, German. We have selected 1793 as the year of this marriage since his first child was born in 1794. He was age 27 in 1793.

On 15 May 1802 (B-) Bastian Lentz, Sr., sells his son (B4-) Dewalt Lentz, '100 acres by estimation, for five shillings'. (Rowan, Bk. 18, p. 313.) In so accepting this sale, Dewalt obtained his inheritance in advance and so this left him off his father's Will.

On 14 May 1805 Devalt Lentz sells Michael Richee '100 acres by estimation'. 'It being part of a tract originally granted to Bastian Lentz by the state and conveyed to Devold Lentz'. (Signed: Davald Lence (X). ($350.00). (Rowan Bk 22, p 537,

On 6 Apr 1818 Devault Lentz sells to George Blazer, 200 acres, for $825.00. (Rowan, Bk. 24, p 575). This is believed to be his final sale of land before going to Illinois, probably in 1818 with his brother, B2- Peter Lentz.

He had 7 children, all lived in Illinois.

Some records show him in IL in 1817. He may have made an advance trip there to buy land in 1817 and waited to sell his land in NC in 1818 before taking his family to IL.

When B25- Peter LENTZ, Jr., died in IL in 1824, B4- Devault LENTZ was paid $2.50 for the lumber used in making B25-'s coffin.

In the 1810 census of Rowan Co., B4- and family show as 1 male under 10, 2 males 26-44, 2 females under 10, and 2 females 26-44.

DNSshows on Rowan census, 1810, p. 326, which cites his and wife's ages as from 26-45; 1 male age 1-10; 2 males 10-16; and 1 female 10-16---five children in all..

NOTE: One historian claimed that a man with wagon and team and $250 could go to Illinois, build a house and sheds for his animals and do some fencing besides buying a farm.

In Illinois, the name was spelled LENCE and the name is quite prominent spelled that way today. A few returned to the spelling of LENTZ.1 He died at Iowa. Dewalt Lentz Sr was also known as Dewald Lentz Sr.3,4 Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID B4744A685CEBAD46A46B355394736E3D5DAD. He was born on 26 June 1766 at Rockland Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania.5,6,1 He was baptized on 20 July 1766 at Old Mertz Lutheran Church, Bieber Creek, Berks County, Pennsylvania; Sponsored by D- Dewalt (or Dewald Lentz (uncle) and Maria Kleinin ('in'added to signify an unmarried woman.) or Maria Klein.7,8,1
He was 7 ch -- spelled Lence.3 Dewalt Lentz Sr was also known as Devault Lentz.1 Dewalt Lentz Sr was also known as Dewald Lence.1 He married wife ? in 1793 at Rowan County, North Carolina; According to Ancestry.com, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1741-1868, this 'marriage record is No. 01 257 and the bond no. is 000126935, witnessed by Jno. Brem, Deputy Clerk. Comment: Ger; Ger.' See 'Rowan Marriages, 1753-1668,' p. 237: LENTZ, Dauvelt & Catharine CLUTS, 7 ____ 1800; Peter Lentz, bondsman, N1 Chaffin , J. P., wit.9,10,1 Dewalt Lentz Sr and wife ? See 'Rowan Marriages, 1753-1668,' p. 237: LENTZ, Dauvelt & Catharine
CLUTS, 7 ____ 1800; Peter Lentz, bondsman, N1 Chaffin , J. P., wit. in 1793. Dewalt Lentz Sr research possibilities are 'Rowan Marriages 1753-1868' states: 'Lentz, Dauvelt & Catharine Clutz, 7 ___ 1800, Peter Lentz, bondsman, N1 Chaffin, J. P., wit.' Following this entry is: 'Lentz, Davalt & ________, ________ 179_; _______,bondsman; John Brem, D.C., wit.' According to Lentz Heritage, Chap V, p. 9, it cites Vol. I, p. 250, Rowan Marriage Records. Date of marriage to Catherine Klutz (Clutz) shows as 14 Mar 1797 by Mrs. McCubbins's notes. The bride was age 17 according to McCubbins. between 1795 and 1800 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 Peter, Dewalt and Bastian was listed as Dewalt Lentz's neighbor on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Davott Lence Sr. 1 male 16-25 (Dewalt? not yet married); 1 male 45+ (Dewalt?); 1 female 0-9; 1 female 10-15; 1 female 45+.11 Sebastian and Dewalt was listed as Bastian Lentz's neighbor on the 1800 Census at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; Bortian Lence Jr. 1 male 26-44; 1 female 26-44 (this is Sebastian Levi Lentz). There is also a "Bostian Lence" near Devott [sic] and Michael Lence. "This" Bostian has 3 males 0-9, 1 male 26-44; 1 female 0-9, and 1 female 26-44. 3 males 0-9 could be Henry (8), Abraham (6), and Dewalt (4). The 1 female could be Caty (9.)12 Dewalt was listed as the head of a family on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina. Davott Lence 2 males 0-9 (John 6; Bastian 4); 1 male 26-44 (Dewald); 1 female 0-9 (Elizabeth); 1 female 16-25 (wife 1)..11 Johann Sebastian Lentz mentioned Dewalt Lentz Sr in a will on 16 March 1807 at Rowan County, North Carolina."His will gives us the names of his children: Bastian Jr. Peter, Elizabeth, Dewalt, Adam, Ana Catherine, John, Margaret, Michael and Marie.13,14,1,15 He died between 1831 and 1840 at Union County, Illinois.3,2

Family

wife ? b. c 1775, d. bt 1818 - 1820
Children

Citations

  1. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Graff-Moeller_2016.
  3. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Graf-Moeller 2016.
  5. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap. IV, p. 11, under B4-.
  6. [S849] Annette Kunselman Burgert, Emigrants from Alsace, page 337.
  7. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, p. 11.
  8. [S849] Annette Kunselman Burgert, Emigrants from Alsace, P. 337.
  9. [S694] Brent H., compiler Holcomb and Kron Mac, Indexer Smith, Marriages of Rowan County NC 1753-1868, p. 237.
  10. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, p. 12. top of page.
  11. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Lence, Davott
    Township: Salisbury
    County: Rowan
    State: North Carolina
    Year: 1800
    Roll: M32_33
    Page: 302
    Image: 236.
  12. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com.
  13. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, pp. 7,8.
  14. [S638] Unknown author, Vol 1, p. 250, Rowan Marriage Records, Page 62, dated 16 Mar 1807.
  15. [S1015] Page-Dunn-Frick-Eagle, online www4.ncsu.edu~lbpage/page-frick/index.html.

Isaac Alexander Lyerly1

M, b. 1820, d. 1856
FatherPeter Lyerly1 b. 1791, d. 6 Jan 1826
MotherMargaret Peggy Cresson1 b. 1792, d. 1872
     Isaac Alexander Lyerly was born in 1820 at North Carolina.1 He married Louise Talbot Jennings in 1836 at Garlandsville, Jasper County, Georgia.1 Isaac Alexander Lyerly lived; NC, GA.1 He died in 1856 at Georgia.1

Family

Louise Talbot Jennings b. 1821, d. 1907

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.

Louise Talbot Jennings1

F, b. 1821, d. 1907
     Louise Talbot Jennings was born in 1821 at Lincoln County, Georgia.1 She married Isaac Alexander Lyerly, son of Peter Lyerly and Margaret Peggy Cresson, in 1836 at Garlandsville, Jasper County, Georgia.1 Her married name was Lyerly.1 Louise Talbot Jennings lived; GA, MS.1 She died in 1907 at Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi.1

Family

Isaac Alexander Lyerly b. 1820, d. 1856

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.

Isaac Lyerly1

M, b. 1822, d. 1851
FatherIsaac Lyerly1 b. 1796, d. 1826
MotherMargaret Peggy Barber1 b. 1800, d. 1878
     Isaac Lyerly was born in 1822 at North Carolina.1 He married Nancy Rex at North Carolina circa 1845.1 Isaac Lyerly lived; NC.1 He died in 1851 at North Carolina.1

Family

Nancy Rex b. c 1825, d. bt 1846 - 1850

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.

Nancy Rex1

F, b. circa 1825, d. between 1846 and 1850
     Nancy Rex was born circa 1825 at Rowan County, North Carolina. She married Isaac Lyerly at North Carolina circa 1845.1 Her married name was Lyerly.1 Nancy Rex died between 1846 and 1850 at Rowan County, North Carolina.

Family

Isaac Lyerly b. 1822, d. 1851

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.

Johann Sebastian Lentz1

M, b. 26 August 1735, d. 3 May 1808
FatherHans Peter Lentz2 b. 18 Jan 1711, d. 31 Oct 1786
MotherAnna Magdalena Klein2 b. 20 Feb 1711, d. 28 Aug 1769
     Johann Sebastian Lentz was also known as Johann Sebastian "Bastian" Lentz.3 Johann Sebastian Lentz also went by the name of Bastian. He was Marriage; Person Source.4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16 He The Personal History of B- Johann Sebastian (Bastian) LENTZ

(NOTE: Large parts of this narrative are from Lentz Heritage but heavily edited and rewritten. Also see the Personal History of his brother, Dewalt. Certain parts of that narrative also apply to Bastian.)

B-BASTIAN LENTZ, Sr.
FIRST GENERATION IN AMERICA

B- Johann Sebastian LENTZ, Sr., was born in or near the village of Postroff, Lorraine, and baptized on 26 Aug 1735 in the Lutheran church of the village of Hirschland, Alsace. Citizens of the village of Postroff, Lorraine, within walking distance, were also parishioners of this church, because Postroff had no church building at the time. Possibly, 26 Aug 1735 was also the date of his birth, since babies were often baptized on the day they were born. The population was primarily German-speaking.

At that time, there was no Germany in the sense of a single, unified country. Unification did not occur until 1871. Before 1871, what became known as the nation of Germany was composed of many German-speaking fiefdoms or mini states owned by various German royal families. In 1735, the area around Postroff itself was in a region belonging to the Counts of Nassau and was known as the Grafschaft of Nassau-Saarwerden. The area has a long and complicated history. Today, Postroff is in France, in the department of Moselle in the Region Lorraine, near Fenetrange.

(As a Multimedia item, you can see a copy of the the original handwritten entry in his baptismal record in the Kirchenbuch (Churchbook). You will see on it some English words inserted by the translator. Also, you can see the translator's transcription of the German handwriting, followed by the full English translation. (Another photo, as a multimedia item, in the entry of his father, Hans Peter LENTZ, there is a map composed of 5 maps, going from the general area to the specific area where Postroff is located.) There are two showing his signature on the ship's passenger lists when he immigrated. There are also photos showing proof of his service in the Revolutionary War. You will also find the Organ (Zion) Lutheran Church in Salisbury, NC, established in 1745 which he and his brother helped established, and modern-day headstones replacing the originals which were illegible or missing. (Also, in the entry for his father, Hans Peter, there is a photograph of the church in the village of Hirschland where the family members were parishioners.)

As shown on the baptismal records, his name at birth was Johann Sebastian LENTZ. After he arrived in America, he dropped not only the 'Johann' but also usually the 'Sebastian' and became known as 'Bastian LENTZ.' Variations and misspellings of his name are often seen in the old records. For example: Bostian LENTZ, B. LENSZ, Bastiann LINTZ, Bastinn LENCH, Boston LANCE, and others. In order to avoid confusing readers, I will refer to him as B- Bastian LENTZ, Sr. except in rare instances when I may refer him as one of these variants. In the source entries themselves, however, I will use exactly whatever spelling appears in that source.

A few words should be said about German naming customs which were/are somewhat different from those practiced in America. Male babies were given a 'saint' name (in his case, 'Johann' meaning 'John') and a 'call name' (in his case, 'Sebastian'). Most of the time, 'Johann' was used for the saint name. Girls most often got saint names of 'Anna' or 'Maria'. Sometimes a boy was simply named Johannes, which means 'John.'

THE 'PUSH' AND THE 'PULL'
-- WHY OUR IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS LEFT GERMANY FOR AMERICA

The more we learn about conditions that prevailed in the area of Postroff for so many years the less we wonder why people there would want to leave and the more we wonder why they did not leave even sooner. There is an inertia in human behavior which is not easily overcome. Either crisis conditions at home (the push), or a powerful attraction from abroad (the pull), is required before people will act. In the simplest terms, the theory holds that migrants may be impelled to leave their homelands by circumstances that push them into fleeing intolerable conditions. Conversely, the lure of real or imagined opportunities in another land moves people to seek the better life.

The push came from slowly moving forces, such as overcrowding in the late 18th and early 19th centuries when Europe's population grew by about 75 percent. At that stage, there was not enough land to provide livelihoods for younger sons, and the developing industrial revolution could not absorb enough of them. From peasant villages throughout Europe tens of thousands sought refuge in America. Those who were not skilled craftsmen became additions to this country's pool of unskilled labor.

In the case of our LENTZ immigrant ancestors, the push must have begun to build even earlier than this. People in the area of Postroff had suffered for many years from continual wars that swept back and forth across the Rhine Valley, from religious persecution by the French, from forced conscription of their young men by this or that army, and from these armies constantly pillaging and destroying their villages and farms. Such turmoil frequently brought on famine and disease.

The turmoil began with the Protestant Reformation (set in motion by Martin Luther) which converted the established religion of Germany, Holland, Denmark, and Sweden from Catholicism to Protestantism. France, however, remained Catholic. Since France was militarily stronger than Germany, the Palatinate and other German provinces near the French border bore the brunt of all conflicts coming from all directions. King Louis XIV of France periodically invaded and devastated the Palatinate starting in 1674. Also the Roman Catholic Church occasionally gained control of Palatinate governments and subjected them to oppressive rule, and they were especially oppressive against Protestants. Most of the Palatinate immigrants to America were Protestants.

The initial pull to America was exerted by the English Quaker, William Penn. Owing to an obligation that the Crown of England owed Penn's father, King Charles II of England settled by giving William Penn all the territory north of Maryland and west of the Atlantic Ocean. There was no way that Penn could personally use such a vast territory, so he traveled to Europe, particularly Germany, seeking people to emigrate to America and settle the area, where Penn guaranteed free land and full freedom of worship to 'law abiding persons who acknowledge the Almighty and Eternal God to be the Creator.' Through his benevolence, most of these Germans were directed to Pennsylvania.

Thus began a series of mass migrations from the Rhine Valley that began slowly about 1690 and grew dramatically in the years before the Revolutionary War--and afterward, in the late 1700's, when Napoleon's army swept across this unfortunate area. At first the Palatine emigrants settled near Germantown (now part of Philadelphia) and then spread out into the rich farmlands in the counties just west of Philadelphia. Gradually letters were written back to Germany saying that everything Penn had told them was true and often giving extravagant accounts of life in America. These provided an even stronger pull. By 1735 the Germans began spilling over into the fertile valleys of Virginia.

By 1752 there were about 90,000 Germans in Pennsylvania (PA, hereafter abbreviated to save space)--and all the good land was taken. The Germans arriving after 1750 had little hope of finding good farmland in PA. Their best alternative was to follow the Scotch-Irish into western North Carolina (NC). In NC, inexpensive and quite fertile land was still available. Thus, in the wilderness between PA and NC the Great Wagon Road appeared.

At first the Great Wagon Road was a lowland path along the eastern Appalachian Mountains used by the Iroquois in the North and the Tuscaroras, Catawbas, and Cherokees in the South. After a peace treaty in 1744 the Warrior's Path became safer for travel. As the footpath widened into a road, Conestoga wagons were seen heading south. Some pioneers built their log cabins and settled along the way, but many others continued on down the Great PA Wagon Road into western NC.

SEBASTIAN'S ARRIVAL IN PHILADELPHIA

Sebastian LENTZ arrived in Philadelphia, PA, on 14 Sep 1753 on the ship Edinburg from Rotterdam via Portsmouth, England, captained by Capt. James Russell. Bastian LENTZ signed the ship's roster, proving that he was literate in German, at least, and possibly in English as well to some extent. (You can find a copy of the ship passenger list bearing his signature as 'bastiann lentz' as a Multimedia item.)

As was required of all new arrivals in the English colonies, he took the following Oath of Allegiance to the King of England: 'We Subscribers, Natives and late Inhabitants of the Palatinate upon the Rhine and Places adjacent...will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his present Majesty King George the Second, and his Successors, Kings of Great Britain, and will be faithful to the Proprietor of this Province; and will demean ourselves peaceably...and strictly observe and conform to the Laws of England and of this Province.' (Source: PA Colonial Records, iii, p. 283.)]

We, his descendants, have no way of knowing exactly what privations he and the others suffered on the long trip from Postroff to Philadelphia, but many contemporary documents survive today which describe the journey.

Typical of these is Journey to PA in the Year 1750 and Return to Germany in the Year 1754 by one Gottlieb Mittleberger, translated by Carl T. Eben, New York, 1898, which describes the miserable, crowded conditions on the ships, the long delays, the 'stench, fumes, horror, vomiting, fever, dysentery, diarrhea, scurvy, cancer, mouth-rot, all of which come from old and sharply salted food and meat, also from very bad and foul water, so that many died miserably...the storms at sea, so that everyone believes the ship will go to the bottom with all on board...'

When at last they reached Philadelphia after a trip lasting up to six months, most of them were ill, probably covered with one another's vomit and other filth, and most, who were redemptioners, were not allowed off the ship until they came to terms with people who would pay for their passage by purchasing their services for a number of years. Often one would have a spouse, parent, or child, who died along the way, and such people would have to pay for the passage of the deceased as well, usually by prolonging their years of service to the purchaser who paid for their passage.

We have no indication that either Sebastian (Bastian) or his brother Diebolt (Dewalt) were redemptioners. They were young, single, and apparently in good health,so it is unlikely that either one lost loved ones during their journeys. It is safe to say, however, that the journey was not a pleasure.

B- SEBASTIAN LENTZ'S EARLY YEARS IN PENNSYLVANIA.

We are not sure why Sebastian LENTZ traveled to Berks County, PA, when he arrived in America, but it is known that Rockland Twp., where he apparently settled, was so named because of the rocky, poor soil, which made the land cheaper than elsewhere. Also, it should be remembered that by 1752, a year before his arrival, more than 90,000 German immigrants had already arrived in PA, and all of the good farmland had been taken. The poor quality of soil on his land and the cheaper prices for better land in NC must be what eventually provided 'the push' and 'the pull' for him to move later to NC. He is largely lost to us in Berks County, PA, but he and his brother, D- Dewalt (Diebolt or Theobald) LENTZ soon show in the records of the Mertz Lutheran Church in Rockland Township where they sponsored children for each other at baptisms. Also, land records show him with land in Rockland Twp as early as 1760 and as late as 1779.

Early marriage records in PA are found only in church records. During the early years of his research, B71154- John Paul LENTZ, compiler/author of Lentz Heritage, employed professional genealogists in PA to search the marriage records of more than 25 churches in the attempt to find Sebastian Lentz's marriage record. None was found.

J. Paul LENTZ and his researchers then used another means to seek out the probable identity of Sebastian's bride. The following shows some possibilities for the last name of his known wife, Mareretha, or Marcretha. C. J. Smith (NOTE: This refers to Mrs. Carlton J. [Ruth] Smith (see Bibliography in Lentz Heritage.) shows Peter BECHTEL, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 on the ship 'Brother,' William Muir, captain, from Rotterdam via Cowes. Smith says that he was with his wife Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. J. Paul LENTZ and his researchers speculated that the BECHTELs may also have had a daughter named Mareretha, named after her mother, who married Sebastian. If this is correct, then Mareretha BECHTEL must have been Sebastian's wife. It is believed that Sebastian and Mareretha must have married by 5 Jun 1758 or before.

There appears to be some solid ground to support this belief:

(1) On the tax rolls in 1779, Sebastian LENTZ was the only man in the county paying taxes on 135 acres.
(2) The same source shows that in 1790, Peter BECHTEL paid taxes on 135 acres and was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in that year.

Since no records show that Sebastian LENTZ sold the 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp., we may assume that he traded it to Peter BECHTEL, probably his brother-in-law, before he himself (Sebastian) joined a wagon train to move to NC. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Another clue is that a marriage record for Sebastian's brother, D- Dewalt LENTZ, was found, showing that on 23 Mar 1767 Dewalt married Elizabeth BECHTEL, probably a sister of Mareretha Bechtel, at the Mertz Lutheran Church, and this record shows that they also lived near the church.

(3) Page 337 of Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America by Annette Kunselman Burgert also seems to support this belief:

If the wives of Sebastian and Dewalt were sisters, this would be a case of two brothers of one family marrying two sisters of another family, resulting in double-first cousins. If such was the case, the two sisters probably were a prime force that kept the two families living on adjoining farms, not only in PA but also in NC.

In summary, the above creates a strong feeling that Bastian LENTZ, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha BECHTEL, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha BECHTEL of Berks Co., PA.

Some of Bastian's and Dewalt's children born in PA appear in the book Pennsylvania Births , Berks County, 1710-1780 by John T. Humphrey; Humphrey Publications, Washington, DC 1997; John T. Humphrey, PO Box 15190, Washington, DC 20003; LOC Cat. No. 97-077364.. The following are the ones shown of Bastian's and his wife Marcretha (or, possibly, Mareretha: Peter (B2-) b, 29 Mar 1762, Dewald (B4) b. 26 Jun 1766, Adam (B5-) b. 2 May 1768, Anna Catharine, (B6-) bp. 15 Aug 1776. It shows that the B2-, B4-, and B5- are recorded in the church records of the Rockland Lutheran Church, Rockland Township which includes birth records form 1738. The birth record for B6- is found in the church records of St. Joseph's Lutheran and Reformed Church, Pike Township. It is not known why a birth record for B1- and B3- do not appear in this book. Could Bastian have lived in another county besides Berks?

SEBASTIAN LENTZ'S SERVICE
IN PENNSYLVANIA DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

On 12 Jul 1777, Sebastian LENTZ took the Oath of Allegiance to the American Colonies before John Olds in Berks Co., PA, as is shown in the Berks County Oath Book, p. 7.

In response to an inquiry by J. Paul LENTZ, the Division of Archives & Manuscripts, PA Historical and Museum Commission sent the following: 'This is to certify that one Sebastian Lentz was commissioned 17 May 1777 as a Captain, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, Berks County Militia, according to the evidence of an undated Battalion Return.'

Commonwealth of PA, PA Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, PA, answered J. Paul LENTZ's follow-up inquiry as follows: 'He was elected for three years. We do know he must have served his full three-year term until March of 1780 when new elections were held and he was not re-elected Captain. This is all we can say for sure from our records.' (SEE DOCUMENTs 9 and 10.) For additional documentation of the PA Revolutionary War military records of Sebastian LENTZ, see Source No. 250.

Captain Sebastian LENTZ shows on pp. 60, 168c, 168g, and 173 of the History of Berks County, Pennsylvania, in the Revolution from 1774 to 1783, by Morton L. Montgomery. Page 60 shows him in the First Battalion -- Eastern Section -- which was commanded by Daniel Hunter of Oley; Captain Sebastian Lentz commanded the 3rd Company -- District.

Page 168c shows: 'The battalion of Col. Lindenmuth (Bern) was mustered in on Sept. 27, 1777, with 268 men, and was engaged in service in the Schuylkill Valley from that time until Washington went into winter quarters at Valley Forge on Dec. 18th, when it is supposed that the men returned to the county. It comprised six companies with the following captains:
'Sebastian LENTZ (Rockland)
Jacob Rodarmel (Richmond)
Francis Umberbauer (Bern)
Daniel Dturk (Alsace)
John Wagner (Bern)
Daniel Womelsdorf (Heidelberg)'

Page 168g shows Sebastian LENTZ as one of 85 captains

B-- SEBASTIAN (BASTIAN) LENTZ MIGRATES TO NORTH CAROLINA

PA records indicate that B- Bastian (or Sebastian) LENTZ left Berks Co. about March 1780, and this fits well with the records in North Carolina.

The Revolutionary War, of course, continued beyond that date, ending on 19 Oct 1781. In NC on 2 Feb 1781, the British General Cornwallis crossed the Yadkin River not far from Organ Church in Rowan Co. where his horse was shot out from under him. From there, Cornwallis went on to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, where he lost one-fourth of his army.

A number of NC records contain several entries which we believe refer to either B- Bastian (Sebastian) LENTZ, Sr. or to B1- Bastian LENTZ, Jr. All of these records are dated well beyond the end of the war and concern pensions and moneys owed to certain individuals for military service during the war or for goods supplied during the war for the war effort. Please see Source 251 for a full description.
.
The first record of Bastian LENTZ in NC is in the Organ (Zion) Lutheran Church in Rowan Co. The minister made the following entry: 'In the year 1774 after the birth of Christ, the following members of our congregation began to build the so-called Organ Church, namely: (Here, he named 22 men, including Bastian LENTZ, and ends as follows:) 'I have written this with my hand, the 31st day of January 1789.' (NOTICE: He wrote this 15 years after the church was first started. Was this Bastian LENTZ, Sr., at age about 54 or was it Bastian LENTZ, Jr. at age 30 This is not known but it appears to be Bastian LENTZ, Jr.)

B1- Bastian LENTZ, Jr. entered for 191 acres of land in Rowan Co. on 4 Aug 1778,

B- Bastian LENTZ, Sr., has about seven years without children between 1768 and 1776. Was he in NC at any time during this period? Or was he in NC in 1774? It does not seem possible for him to have been in NC at this time. He paid taxes in PA for the following years during this period: 1770, 1771, 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. He must not have been away from home in PA. In other words, it must have been B1- Bastian LENTZ, Jr., who helped start the Organ Church in 1774

. On 1 Jan 1789, the following Lentz people signed the Constitution of Organ Church: Bastian LENTZ (Sr., or Jr.?), D- Dewalt LENTZ (Sr.), Peter LENTZ (B2- age 27), and Jacob LENTZ (B7- age 12.) Some others known to have been friends and future in-laws of the Lentz family signed as follows: Peter BARRINGER, John Adam CRUSE, Philip CRUSE, Valentine HORNBERGER, George Michael HEILIG, Frederick MILLER, Wendel MILLER, George LUDWIG, (Lewis) SIFFORD, and William SIFFERT (Sifford). On 29 Apr 1826, signing were: George, Charles, Dewalt, John, Jacob, Peter and Henry LENTZ.

Organ Church was started in 1774 and finished in 1794. The delay was caused by the Revolutionary War. Black powder was not available for blasting the rock at the quarry and oyster shells could not be obtained from the coast to burn to make the masonry lime needed for the mortar. Also, the extra manpower needed was away at war. B711- Jacob LENTZ said that his grandfather B7- Jacob LENTZ hauled oyster shells in a wagon train from Fayetteville to the site of the church to be burned for lime. This was after the war.

On 6 Nov 1778, Peter BARRINGER had entered for 400 acres on Dutch Second Creek in Rowan Co., NC (Raleigh Bk 51, p. 51). The letter to the surveyor instructed the surveyor to survey this tract of land for Peter BARRINGER. The surveyor marked it: 'Signed over to Bostan LANCE.' He surveyed 301 acres and dated it 5 Apr 1782. It was issued to Boston LANCE on 10 Oct 1783.

It appears that B- Bastian LENTZ must have arrived in NC from PA in 1780, purchased the claim of land belonging to Peter BARRINGER and started clearing and building for his farm and home. It is possible that Peter BARRINGER was a friend of B1-Bastian LENTZ, Jr., who arranged for him to sell to his father even before his father left PA. No doubt they kept in touch a few times each year by correspondence or word of mouth by the wagoners who traveled back and forth hauling supplies to and from PA.

This now gets both B- Bastian LENTZ, Sr., and B1- Bastian LENTZ, Jr., on farms about four miles apart in Rowan Co., NC, on the Cabarrus Co. line, with Organ Church about two miles from Junior and about three miles from Senior. They probably visited with each other every Sunday after church services.

The 1790 census of Rowan Co., NC., shows 'LANCE, Bostion (Lentz, Bastian), with 2 free white males of 16 years and upward, including heads of families; 2 free white males under 16 years; and 4 white females including heads of families. B4- Dewalt married in 1793, B7- Jacob married in 1802, and B9- Michael would all be at home, with Jacob and Michael being under age 16, accounting for all the boys. B3- Elizabeth was living in Cabarrus Co. in 1789, B8- Margaret had her first child born 1 Jan 1800 and must not have still been living at home. One of the free white females would have been Bastian's wife, Mareretha; the second would be B6- Anna Catherine, the third B8- Margaret, and the fourth B0- Mary. This accounts for all the females.

The 1800 census shows 3 free white males under 10, 1 free white male 26-44, 1 free white female under 10, and 1 free white female 26-44. The three white males under 10 are hard to identify, since none of Bastian's and Mareretha's children were that young in 1800. The 1 free white female under 10 must have been B0- Maria, or Mary. The free white male 26-44 must have been Bastian himself and the free white female must have been his wife Mareretha. B9- Michael married 17 Jan 1800 and shows in a separate house with his wife. Perhaps the 3 free white males under 10 were other relatives. We have assumed that the girl is BO- Maria born between 1774 and 1784, and, since no guardian was appointed for her after her father died in 1807, we selected 1781 as her possible year of birth. She would be 16. She would have been age 34 when she married in 1815. Maria could have had children, but we have found no records.

It appears that the LENTZ brothers had each learned a trade before coming to America. Bastian LENTZ, Sr., is known to have had two sons who were 'joiners,' i.e., carpenters or cabinet makers. D- Dewalt LENTZ, Sr., and his son D2- Peter LENTZ were tailors.

Two other Lentz men, J- John LENTZ and P- Peter LENTZ, Sr., who lived in the area were, for many years, thought to have been some kin to Bastian, Sr., and Dewalt, Sr., but the relationship, if any, was never identified. According to a family legend that continued for many years up to recently (June 2002), the four were all thought to have been brothers but this has now been disproved. In 2003, DNA tests conducted by descendants of Bastian, Dewalt, Peter, and John proved and supported documentary evidence in 2002 that John and Peter Lentz were not related to Bastian and Dewalt. John LENTZ was listed as a blacksmith in NC, and may have also been a water saw mill operator, as he owned land on Crane Creek in Rowan, sold it and bought a farm that had anoither saw mill on it or he built a saw mill on it down on Riles Creek in Rowan. The trade of P- Peter LENTZ, Sr., has not been identified.

On 12 May 1802, B- Bastian signed the marriage bond for his son B7- Jacob LENTZ to marry Mary YOST, daughter of Jacob and Mary YOST. His son signed as Jacob LENTZ, but his father, age 65, made his 'X' to the name written by a scribe as Boston 'X' LANTS. This was the third son to marry recently, Devault in 1793, Michael in 1800, and Jacob in 1802. B- Bastian decided to give them some of his farm land.

On 15 May 1802, Bastian gave each of these sons '100 acres by estimation,' for 'five shillings' each. Then he left two of them off his Will, Devault (Dewalt) and Jacob, and required son Michael (B9-) to give bond to support his mother during her widowhood in order to inherit the home place. He signed the deed as 'bastiann lentz' (NOTE: This is the same spelling and use of lower case letters as he used when he signed the manifest of the ship that brought him to America in 1753).

B- Bastian LENTZ, Sr., prepared his Last Will and Testament on 16 Mar 1807. Please see Source 254 for the complete text.

It is believed that Bastian LENTZ, Sr., died in 1807. Col. Ray K. SMATHERS stated that a severe epidemic passed through Rowan Co. in 1807, killing many older people. Smathers is a descendant of the William SMATHERS who married widow M. LENTZ. This epidemic must have also hit the elderly J- John Lentz, Sr. who also died that same year. On 30 Jul 1808, Peter LENTZ and William SIFFORD (Jr.), executors of his estate, sold to Michael LENTZ of Rowan Co., NC, for $200.00, 196 acres that had been 'granted by North Carolina to Bostian Lentz.' (This Michael LENTZ must have been B9-)

On 17 Mar 1809, widow M. LENTZ, married William Smathers. This could be widow Margaret LENTZ, wife of J- John Lentz, Sr., except for information that appears in Smathers family records, which show that Mareretha LENTZ, widow of Bastian Lentz, Sr., married their elderly ancestor, William Smathers. Their records also show that she survived William Smathers. Two of her grandsons and possibly a granddaughter who cared for her in her old age were said to have received the Smather farm. Apparently, however, they did not receive it outright but purchased it after the division of the estate.

On 13 Jan 1810, Rowan Co. Court Minutes show the final settlement of the Will of Bastian LENTZ, Sr., dec'd, by his administrators, (B2-) Peter LENTZ and William SIFFORD, husband of (B3-) Elizabeth LENTZ. (See Source 257 for details.)

Several ladies who were elderly when J. Paul LENTZ was compiling Lentz Heritasge grew up in the neighborhood of the William Smathers farm and could remember the houses, roads, and neighbors quite well. These ladies were 'Mrs. File,' 'Mrs. Plyler,' and 'Mrs. Plyler's sister.' Mrs. Plyler and her sister studied Rowan Co. deeds and other records and produced a rough map showing the land their ancestors inherited through their grandmother, Mareretha Lentz Smathers. This is in the vicinity of Liberty Church where Stokes Ferry Road crosses St. Matthews Road, showing both the old and new cemetaries where Lentz ancestors are buried. They show proof of the statements made by Col. Ray K. Smathers about his ancestors and widow Mareretha Lentz.

Unfortunately the map would not reproduce, according to J. Paul Lentz, Lentz Heritage, Chap. IV, p. 9. I wish I had a copy; I could redraw it and make it reproducible.--JWL)

Mrs. Plyler wrote: 'This map was made from research, talk with old
friends, and from our memories, having walked these roads, known and visited
in these homes, and having a blood relationship to most of these people - this
place is very dear to us.

'My sister Hazel and I were born in the old Barringer Mill house. Though
its walls and roof are gone and the yard is now a field, some of Mother's rose
bushes still grow and bloom along the old garden fence to bear mute
testimony that this place was once a home.'

The statement in the Will 'to make them equal with my other sons' can be explained as follows: It will be remembered from a paragraph above that in 1802 B- Bastian LENTZ, Sr., sold to Devalt (Dewalt) and Jacob LENTZ 100 acres by estimation for only 'five shillings' and that son Peter, listed only as an executor of the Will, was sold 301 acres on Dutch Second Creek for only 60 pounds on 26 Jan 1788 (Rowan Bk 11, p. 604), which was considered as his inheritance. The deed says that 'Bostian LENTZ sells his son Peter LENTZ...it being a tract originally granted to Bostion LENTZ by the state of North Carolina on Oct 10, 1783.' Signed: Bastinn LENTZ, Witness: David J. LENTZ. There was a known son named Adam LENTZ, but, since no records on him have been found, it is assumed that he died early

. Almost all family members show on the records of Organ Church--records of communion, signing of the church constitution, marriages, births, confirmations, deaths, and other records. Bohrer (Biblio.) reports that the first pastor of Organ Church recorded loaning books to the families of Bastian and Dewalt LENTZ. Rev. STORCH's diary shows, on page 23, that Dewalt and Bastian LENTZ paid 18 pounds, 3 shillings to Organ Church in 1796-1798. These families were strong supporters of the Lutheran Church.

Lentz Heritqage states that a KLINE family, or families, appears to have had close relationships with the Bastian and Dewalt LENTZ families. Bastian LENTZ shows as executor on the WILL of Michael KLINE, planter of Mecklenburg Co., NC., and Duval (Dewalt) LENTZ shows as a witness with Jacob KLINE , 1 Dec 1784, Book D, pages 125-7. A Peter KLINE and Bastian arrived in Philadelphia on the same boat and sponsored children for each other. While unwed, D- Dewalt LENTZ and Maria KLININ sponsored B4- Dewalt LENTZ, Jr., at baptism in the Mertz Lutheran Church in PA. (Lentz Heritage, Chap IV, p. 21 addendum.) [We now know that the KLEIN-KLINE-CLINE people were actually close relatives. Bastian's and Dewalt's mother was a daughter of Moritz KLEIN who also came to America with his wife and several children. The KLEIN-KLINE-CLINE people are Moritz KLEIN's descendants.] Bastian LENTZ served as bondsman for the marriage of Jacob CLINE and Catharine GOBBLE, 18 Mar 1794 (See p. 79 of Marriages of Rowan County, North Carolina -- 1753-1868, compiled by Brent H. Holcomb; Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1986.

THE LOCATION OF THE ORGAN (ZION) LUTHERAN CHURCH
ESTABLISHED 1745
SALISBURY, NORTH CAROLINA

The actual location of the church is on Organ Church Road, Rockwell, NC.
Rockwell is a town near Salisbury, which is the county seat. Nearby is the Grace
(Lower Stone) Church, 2405 Lower Stone Church Road, Rockwell, NC 28138, which is/was closely associated with the Organ Church. I suggest that you may wish to use Google ('Google it' ) to find the map and whatever satellite photograph exists for them. Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID D22FACCDF3AE944C9454341CF075DD02778F. Johann Sebastian Lentz was also known as Bastian Lentz Sr.17,18 Johann Sebastian Lentz was also known as Johann Sebastian Lentz. He witnessed A VISIT TO HIRSCHLAND
Hirschland nestles in foothills on the western side of the Vosges Mountains. A Farming Village
Not much has changed in Hirschland since the 1740's. At least that's the impression I got when I visited for the first time in July 1998. I believe if Theobald and Hans Georg Bieber could return there today, they might marvel at the cars and tractors and paved streets, but the layout of the village, many of the buildings, and the surrounding landscape would be completely familiar.
Farming remains the chief economic activity of Hirschland. The farmers' houses and barns are right in the village, a typical arrangement in France. Around the village are small woodlots, cow pastures, and fields planted with corn, wheat, and hay. I was struck by how much the countryside resembles the region in Berks County, Pennsylvania where the Bieber emigrants settled.
A small stream called the Isch flows through Hirschland. In the nearby countryside is an ancient mill, the Ischermühle. The Isch flows west from Hirschland and in a short distance joins the Sarre. The Sarre flows north through a sequence of towns named after it --- Saare-Union, Saareguemines, Saarbrücken --- before joining the Mosel River in the Saar region of Germany.

Not a Typical Tourist Destination
Hirschland is a small village. Its population was 358 in 1794, 577 in 1905, and 286 in 1990 (Source: Robert Behra's Alsace page).
There are few tourist amenities. I saw no place to stay overnight. One building had a restaurant sign, but it was closed when I was there. The only shops I saw were two places selling snails. I wonder whether escargots were popular in 18th Century Hirschland, or whether this taste was acquired more recently.
Despite the absence of a bakery or butchery, the residents of Hirschland do have access to fresh bread and meat. During my brief vist, two delivery trucks were plying the streets of Hirschland, selling goods from a bakery and a butcher shop in nearby towns.
Many visitors to Alsace are understandably drawn to the picturesque towns of Upper (southern) Alsace, where vineyards, half-timbered houses, restaurants, and hotels abound. Hirschland is in Lower (northern) Alsace. This region is also quite beautiful, but is less oriented towards tourism than Upper Alsace.
But the factors drawing me to Hirschland differed from those of the typical tourist. I was enchanted by the place, and thankful to see it so little changed over the ages.


Hirschland Church

Hirschland Church. Present structure dates from 1755.
From a history of Hirschland Church by Robert Muller (1996), translated from French by Steven Bieber:
"During the Middle Ages, the village of Hirschland was a place of pilgrimage. Its church was mentioned in 1290 during a Bishops conference in Rome. Its condition in 1680 was very bad and a part of the church had been burned. After 1700, the peace returned and it was necessary to construct a new church. The county appointed an architect named STENGEL to design the plans. Its construction, and that of six other churches, was during the period in which King Louis XV participated in the financing for the construction of religious buildings. Hirschland had to erect the building alone. In large part it was the responsibility of the village people to perform the construction: cutting the blocks of stone, transporting them to the site and cutting down the trees from the communal forest. The church's location is the same as the previous church after having preserved the base of the former bell-tower. The roof of this last design had two slopes, onto which was placed a globe surmounted by a cross. The present bell-tower pinnacle has been in place since 1867. Two rows of windows are situated along the nave, like in a house.
Inside the church.
"The interior is impressive by its simplicity. At the end, was the altar with a raised altar chair against the wall. The altar area was shared by some other less ornate benches against the walls facing the altar which were occupied by the pastor and the Presbyterian counselors. To each side of the chair there was a big window. All of it changed dramatically in 1950 and some elements have disappeared.
"On the sides, the galleries above the Tuscany columns were preserved (they are over two centuries old) by the parishioners of POSTROFF. It is because of them that there remain two rows of windows.
"It seems as though an old organ was replaced by the present one in 1886. Two people have been buried in the church. Jean Jacques LUCIUS (born in 1669, died 18 May 1754) was the pastor to Hirschland for 56 years and died before the reconstruction was completed in 1755 as is indicated on some of the columns near the altar. (It was Rev. LUCIUS who wrote the church records recording the records of the Hans Peter LENTZ and Moritz KLEIN families.) The second person, Charlotte WAGNER (died 1671), was the wife of pastor Georges ENGEL and has a sepulcher in the church."


Travelling northeast from Hirschland, one encounters first Eyweiler, two miles distant, and then Berg, one and one-half miles further along. Both villages are significant in the history of the Bieber family and allied Pennsylvania Dutch families. For instance, Sara Ludmann was from Eyweiler, and her marriage to Theobald Bieber is recorded in both the Berg Kirchenbuch and the Hirschland Kirchenbuch. The Berg record is important because it names the fathers of both Sara and Theobald.

The hill overlooking Berg has been a religious site for centuries, and today is the site of a Catholic church perched dramatically over the town. The steeple of the church affords wonderful views of Berg and the surrounding countryside (above).


La Petite-Pierre, Alsace. Enlarge


Hotel Kleiber, St Jean-Saverne. Enlarge

Ten miles east of Hirschland is the village La Petite-Pierre, in the heart of the Vosges mountains. It lies within the Regional Nature Park of the Northern Vosges. I'm not aware of any particular significance to the Bieber family, but La Petite-Pierre is an attractive, interesting place.

During my brief visit to Alsace, I stayed at the Hotel Kleiber in St Jean-Saverne. St Jean-Saverne is a quiet, pretty hillside village north of the bustling town of Saverne. It is, I suppose, only 15 minutes from Hirschland via the Autoroute A4, but I never actually took the Autoroute. It was much more pleasant to reach Hirschland in 30-45 minutes over the back roads.

The restored Chapelle St-Michel is a short walk from St Jean-Saverne. Nearby are prehistoric sites called the "Sorcerers' School" and the "Socerers' Grotto" recognizable by shapes carved from the bedrock. My Michelin Guide did not elaborate on these sites, but I suppose they are remains of the Druid culture.

From the "Sorcerers' School" one gains a superb view (below) over the northern Alsace plain. On a clear day the steeple of Strassburg Cathedral can be sighted. The hills on the horizon are in Germany, beyond the Rhine.


Created by John W Bieber
Copyright 1998-1999 --- All rights reserved
Send feedback to john@bartol.udel.edu
Last modified: 1999 January 7
between 1600 and 1800 at Hirschland, Bas Rhin, Alsace, France.19 He included in research possibilities of John Lentz and Peter Lentz between 1700 and 1800 at North Carolina; 1. The DNA evidence demonstrates that Peter and John can not be sons of Hans Petrus Lentz.
Many people who are interested in Lentz and/or Lance genealogy will have read the book Lentz Heritage, by John Paul Lentz. In this book, John Paul Lentz refers to four Lentz men who lived in the same place at the same time as "brothers". However, no documentation has ever been found to support this claim. Since these four men - John, Peter, Bastian, and Dewalt - seem to be about the same age, and have the same last name, and were in the same place at the same time, it seems reasonable to conclude that they may have been brothers.

It is against this backdrop that a group of people with interest in Lentz and Lance genealogy began to use DNA to determine the actual relationship among these four "brothers".

Let us start with a presumptive hypothesis that John, Peter, Bastian, and Dewalt are all brothers. Then, if we can find direct descendants who derive from each of the four brothers along the all-male line, and compare their DNA, then we should find that in all four cases the Y chromosome is identical, or at least very similar. This is what was done.

For Dewalt Lentz (D), we tested a descendant who was a 4th great grandson. For Bastian Lentz (B), we tested a 3rd great grandson. For John Lentz (J), we tested a 6th great grandson. Then for Peter (P), we tested one descendant who was a 4th great grandson (a 3rd great grandson of Peter's son Samuel (Samuel was Peter's fourth son, hence P4)) and a 5th great grandson (a 4th great grandson of Peter's son John (John was Peter's third son, hence P3)). [Note that when I say "we", I really mean that the samples were analyzed by FamilyTreeDNA.] So we have 5 DNA samples that represent a total of 36 generations (or more precisely, transmission events, the number of times a Y chromosome was passed from a father to his son).

I will neglect to demonstrate the mathematics here except to say it like this: We tested 12 sites on the Y chromosome for each of the 5 volunteers. Let's assume a mutation rate of 0.3% per site per generation (or transmission event). With 36 events times 12 tested sites per event at 0.3%, we should expect to see the following probabilities (rounded).

Number of Mutations: Probability:
0 27.4%
1 35.5%
2 23.0%
3 9.9%
4 3.2%
5 0.8%
6 0.2%
7 <0.03%
8 or more very small numbers
So how many mutations are present in our set of samples, presuming that the four are brothers? Well, there is one present in the J4 sample line (the change in DYS 389i CAUSES the change in DYS 389ii, so it is only one change, in spite of the numbers being different at two sites). Then there are an additional 4 mutations in the Bastian sample line (noting it takes 2 changes to get from 23 to 25 in DYS390). Then there are 4 more mutations in the Dewalt line. So that makes a total of nine. [Note that you do not get to "share" mutations in this case. That is to say, one mutation could not have been responsible for the change in DYS 391 in the Bastian line AND in the Dewalt line. That could be true if you thought maybe Bastian was a son of Dewalt, or something like that. But in our case, if Bastian and Dewalt are considered as brothers, then the changes must have come independently.]

So you can see that we have 9 mutations. And the probability of that happening in 36 transmission events is very close to zero (this would represent a mutation rate about 10x the normal value). So the conclusion is that these four men could not have shared the same father. The DNA demonstrates this. So why do I say that John and Peter are not the sons of Hans Petrus Lentz, instead of saying that it is Bastian and Dewalt who are not the sons of Hans Petrus Lentz? This is because the baptism records for Bastian and Dewalt as sons of Hans Petrus Lentz have been found, whereas no such records have been found for Peter and John. So it is the DNA which demonstrates that they could not have, all four of them, been sons of Hans Petrus Lentz, and it is the paper genealogy which provides the answer as to which ones were sons of Hans Petrus Lentz. Therefore, Peter and John are eliminated as being possible sons of Hans Petrus Lentz.

So from the DNA alone (a conclusion which agrees very well with the paper documentation), I concluded that Bastian and Dewalt are very closely related to each other - close enough to be brothers. John and Peter are also very closely related to each other - close enough to be brothers, but slightly more likely to be close cousins. Our technique is not precise enough to determine these exact relationships unambiguously. But it IS precise enough to determine that all four Lentz men could NOT have been brothers.20 Johann was born at Postroff, Bas Rhin, Alsace, France, on 26 August 1735.21 He was born on 26 August 1735 at Postroff, Bas Rhin, Alsace, France.22,23,24,25,26 He was baptized on 26 August 1735 at Evang Luth Ch of Hirschland, Hirschland, Bas Rhin, Alsace, France.27,15 He was baptized at Hirschland Lutheran Church, Hirschland, Bas Rhin, Alsace, France, on 26 August 1735. Religion: Hirschland Lutheran KB (N. Alsace p. 337) possibly Matthias Braun is godfather; alternate address is Evan. Luth Ch. of Hirschland, Postroff, Nassau-Saarwerden, Germany; I believe that the questioned name Catharina DEUTINGERN probably actually is Catharina DINTINGER, who served as a godparent in 1735. (See Hein, p. 112) I believe that the questioned name Hans Petro PFLANZE should be Hans Peter PFLAUM, Schumacher (shoemaker, cobbler), a citizen of Postroff. He served as a godparent in 1735, married Anna Magdalena GANDLOFF. (See Hein, p. 241.) I believe Agnes WEISNER probably should be Agnex WEISS, b. 1720, served as a godparent in 1735, married on 19 Feb 1747 to Christoph TUSSING, Schaeffer (shepherd), a citizen of Hirschland. (See Hein, p. 305),
Baptismal Record of Johann Sebastian Lentz from the Evangelical Lutheran Kirchenbuck (Churchbook) of Hirschland in the Repulbic of France: 'Year 1735 - On 26 Aug [1735] Hans Petrus Lenz from Postroff and Anna Magdalena, his wedded wife, had a little son baptised. His godparents were Hans Petro Pflanze (surname not totally clear) from Postroff and Sebastian (surname illegible) from Postroff (one word illegible) and Catharine Deutinger (surname not totally clear) and Agnes Weisner (uncertain of the 'sner' in this name) from Hirschland; was called Joh[ann] Sebastian. Moved away to American in 1753.'.17,28,29,30,31 He was born on 26 August 1737 at Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany.26 He took an oath of allegiance at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, in 1753. To the King of England.17 He immigrated on 14 September 1753 to Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; arrived in Philadelphia 14 Sep 1753 on the ship 'Edinburgh,' Capt John Russell, from Rotterdam, last from Portsmouth, England. (Strassburger Pennsylvania German Pioneers Vol. 1, pp. 522-524), Burgert Eighteenth Century Emigrants, p. 337, Dr. Gerhard Hein). Sebastian Lentz's own signature on the ship's roster indicates that he was better educated than many others. The sailing time of the ship Edinburg is not shown, but, from the records of other ships, we estimate that the trip took more than two months. This does not include the time spent traveling down the Rhine River and reaching Portsmouth, England.17 He immigrated on 14 September 1753 to Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; arrived from Germany:; As shown by Strassburger, he arrived on the ship Edinburg, Capt., John Russell, from Rotterdam, last from Portsmouth, England. Sebastian LENTZ's own signature on the ship's roster indicates that he was better educated than many others. The sailing time of the ship Edinburg is not shown, but, from the records of other ships, we estimate that the trip took more than two months. This does not include the time spent traveling down the Rhine River and reaching Portsmouth, England. Bastian was one of two brothers (the other was Diebolt, or Dewalt) who immigrated to America from Germany. Two additional Lentz men, Peter and John, were for many years believed to be brothers of Bastian and Dewalt because of longstanding North Carolina legend and also because all four settled for a while (between 1778 and 1782) n Rowan Co., NC. We are now sure, however, that Peter and John were not brothers of Bastian and Dewalt because Peter and John do not appear in the baptismal records of the same church where Bastian and Dewalt were baptized and as a result of DNA tests conducted using descendants of the four. We know that in the years 1777-1780 (Revolutionary War), Bastian was a captain in the Berks County, PA, militia. Also, he and his brother Dewalt show up in the records of the Mertz Lutheran Church in Rockland Twp, PA, where they sponsored children for each other at baptism. PA Archives, Series 3, Vol 18, Berks Co., p 266, show that in 1779 Sebastian LENTZ paid taxes amounting to 26 shillings in Rockland Twp on 135 acres, 4 horses, 3 cattle, no sheep, and that he was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in the county. (Also see EIGHTEENTH CENTURY EMIGRANTS FROM THE NORTHERN ALSACE TO AMERICA, p. 337.)32,33,23,15,34 He married Anna Margaretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter Bechtel and Anna Mareretha ?, circa 1758 at Berks County, Pennsylvania; Early marriage records in PA are found only in church records. During the early years of his research, B71154- John Paul Lentz, compiler/author of LENTZ HERITAGE, employed professional genealogists in PA to search the marriage records of more than 25 churcbes to find Sebastian Lentz's marriage record. None was found. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers then used another means to seek out the probable identity of Sebastian's bride. The following shows some possibilities for the last name of his known wife, Mareretha. C. J. Smith (NOTE: RE-FIND AND SUPPLY MORE INFO TO THE READER ON THIS C. J. SMITH.) shows Peter Bechtel, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 with wife Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers speculated that the Bechtels may have also had a daughter named Mareretha, named after her mother, who married Sebastian. If this is corrcct, then Mareretha Bechtel must have been Sebastian's wife. It is believed that Sebastian and Mareretha must have married by Jun 1758 or before. There appears to be some solid ground to support this theory: (1) On the tax rolls in 1779, Sebastian Lentz was the only man in the county paying taxes on 135 acres. (2) The same source shows that in 1790, Peter Bechtel paid taxes on 135 acres and was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in that year. Since no records show that Sebastian Lentz sold 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp., we may assume that he traded it to Peter Bechtel, probably his brother-in-law, before he himself joined a wagon train to move to North Carolina. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Another clue is that a marriage record for Sebastian's brother, D-Dewalt Lentz, was found, showing that on 23 Mar 1767 Dewalt married Elizabeth Bechtel, probably a sister of Mareretha Bechtel, at the Mertz Lutheran Church, and this record shows that they also lived near the church. If the wives of Sebastian and Dewalt were sisters, this would be a case of two brothers of one family marrying sisters of another family, resulting in double-first cousins. If such was the case, the two sisters probably were a prime force that kept the two families living on adjoining farms, not only in PA but also in NC. In summary, the above creates a strong feeling that Bastian Lentz, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha Bechtel of Berks Co., PA.35,36,34,37 Johann Sebastian Lentz married Anna Margaretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter Bechtel and Anna Mareretha ?, circa 1758 at Berks County, Pennsylvania; Early marriage records in PA are found only in church records. During the early years of his research, B71154- John Paul Lentz, compiler/author of LENTZ HERITAGE, employed professional genealogists in PA to search the marriage records of more than 25 churcbes to find Sebastian Lentz's marriage record. None was found. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers then used another means to seek out the probable identity of Sebastian's bride. The following shows some possibilities for the last name of his known wife, Mareretha. C. J. Smith (NOTE: RE-FIND AND SUPPLY MORE INFO TO THE READER ON THIS C. J. SMITH.) shows Peter Bechtel, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 with wife Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers speculated that the Bechtels may have also had a daughter named Mareretha, named after her mother, who married Sebastian. If this is corrcct, then Mareretha Bechtel must have been Sebastian's wife. It is believed that Sebastian and Mareretha must have married by Jun 1758 or before.
There appears to be some solid ground to support this theory:
(1) On the tax rolls in 1779, Sebastian Lentz was the only man in the county paying taxes on 135 acres.
(2) The same source shows that in 1790, Peter Bechtel paid taxes on 135 acres and was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in that year.
Since no records show that Sebastian Lentz sold 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp., we may assume that he traded it to Peter Bechtel, probably his brother-in-law, before he himself joined a wagon train to move to North Carolina. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Another clue is that a marriage record for Sebastian's brother, D-Dewalt Lentz, was found, showing that on 23 Mar 1767 Dewalt married Elizabeth Bechtel, probably a sister of Mareretha Bechtel, at the Mertz Lutheran Church, and this record shows that they also lived near the church.
If the wives of Sebastian and Dewalt were sisters, this would be a case of two brothers of one family marrying sisters of another family, resulting in double-first cousins. If such was the case, the two sisters probably were a prime force that kept the two families living on adjoining farms, not only in PA but also in NC.
In summary, the above creates a strong feeling that Bastian Lentz, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha Bechtel of Berks Co., PA.35,23 He petitioned the court to become a citizen at Rockland Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, in 1765.30,38,34 Johann Sebastian Lentz was naturalized say September 1765 at Pennsylvania; "Autumn 1765."39,34 B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., has about seven years without children between 1768 and 1776. Was he in NC at any time during this period? Or was he in NC in 1774? It does not seem possible for him to have been in NC at this time. He paid taxes in PA for the following years during this period: 1770, 1771, 1772,1773, 1774, and 1775. He must not have been away from home in PA. In other words, it must have been B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr. who helped start the Organ Church in 1774.17 He was a witness The first record of a Bastian Lentz in NC is in the Organ (Zion) Lutheran Church in Rowan Co.. The minister made the following entry: "In the year 1774 after the birth of Christ, the following members of our congregation began to build the so-called Organ Church, namely: (Here, he named 22 men, including Bastian Lentz, and ends as follows:) "I have written this with my hand, the 31st day of January 1789." (NOTICE: He wrote this 15 years after the church was first started.) Was this Bastian Lentz, Sr., at age about 37 or was it Bastian Lentz, Jr., at age 15? This is not known for certain but it appears to be Bastian Lentz, Jr with Bastian Lentz in 1774 at Zion (Organ) Lutheran Church, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.17 Johann Sebastian Lentz began military service between 1777 and 1780.40,41,42,43 He began military service between 1777 and 1780.44,41,42,34 He Capt Berks County PA Militia 1777-1780; We know that in the years 1777-1780 (Revolutionary War), Bastian was a captain in the Berks County, PA, militia. Also, he and his brother Dewalt show up in the records of the Mertz Lutheran Church in Rockland Twp, PA, where they sponsored children for each other at baptism. PA Archives, Series 3, Vol 18, Berks Co., p 266, show that in 1779 Sebastian LENTZ paid taxes amounting to 26 shillings in Rockland Twp on 135 acres, 4 horses, 3 cattle, no sheep, and that he was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in the county. (Also see EIGHTEENTH CENTURY EMIGRANTS FROM THE NORTHERN ALSACE TO AMERICA, p. 337.) The Division of Archives & Manuscripts, PA Historical and Museum Commission, sent the following: "This is to certify that one Sebastian LENTZ was commissioned 17 May 1777 as a Captain, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, Berks County Militia, according to the evidence of an undated Battalion Return." Commonwealth of PA, PA Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, PA, answered our inquiry about Sebastian LENTZ and his service as a captain in the Berks County Militia as follows: "He was elected for three years. We do know he must have served his full three year term until March of 1780 when new elections were held and he was not re-elected captain. This is all we can say for sure from our records."17 Johann took an oath of allegiance at Berks County, Pennsylvania, on 12 July 1777. To the American Colonies, before John Olds.17 M; Bastian was one of two brothers (the other was Diebolt, or Dewalt) who immigrated to America from Germany. Two additional Lentz men, Peter and John, were for many years believed to be brothers of Bastian and Dewalt because of longstanding North Carolina legend and also because all four settled for a while (between 1778 and 1782) in Rowan Co., NC. We are now sure, however, that Peter and John were not brothers of Bastian and Dewalt because Peter and John do not appear in the baptismal records of the same church where Bastian and Dewalt were baptized and as a result of DNA tests conducted using descendants of the four.17 He emigrated circa March 1780 from Rowan County, North Carolina; PA records indicate that B- Bastian (or Sebastian) Lentz left Berks Co. about March 1780, and this fits well with records in NC. The Revolutionary War, of course, continued beyond that date, ending on 19 Oct 1781. In NC on 2 Feb 1781, the British General Cornwallis crossed the Yadkin River not far from Organ Church in Rowan Co. where his horse was shot out from under him. From there, Cornwallis went on to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, where he lost one-fourth of his army. A number of North Carolina records contain several entries which we believe refer to either B-Bastian (Sebastian) Lentz, Sr. or to B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr. All of these records are dated well beyond the end of the war and concern pensions and moneys owed to certain individuals for military service during the war or for goods supplied for the war effort. The first record of a Bastian Lentz in NC is in the Organ (Zion) Lutheran Church in Rowan Co.. The minister made the following entry: 'In the year 1774 after the birth of Christ, the following members of our congregation began to build the so-called Organ Church, namely: (Here, he named 22 men, including Bastian Lentz, and ends as follows:) 'I have written this with my hand, the 31st day of January 1789.' (NOTICE: He wrote this 15 years after the church was first started.) Was this Bastian Lentz, Sr., at age about 37 or was it Bastian Lentz, Jr., at age 15? This is not known for certain but it appears to be Bastian Lentz, Jr. It should also be noted that B1-Bastian Lentz, Jr., entered for 191 acres of land in Rowan Co. on 4 Aug 1778. B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., has about seven years without children between 1768 and 1776. Was he in NC at any time during this period? Or was he in NC in 1774? It does not seem possible for him to have been in NC at this time. He paid taxes in PA for the following years during this period: 1770, 1771, 1772,1773, 1774, and 1775. He must not have been away from home in PA. In other words, it must have been B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr. who helped start the Organ Church in 1774. On 1 Jan 1789, the following Lentz people signed the Constitution of Organ Church: Bastian Lentz (Sr. or Jr.?); D- Dewalt Lentz (Sr.); Peter Lentz (B2-, age 27); and Jacob Lentz (B7- age 12). Some others known to have been friends and future in-laws of the Lentz family signed as follows: Peter Barringer, John Adam Cruse, Philip Cruse, Valentine Hornberger, George Michael Heilig, Frederick Miller, Wendel Miller, George Ludwig, (Lewis) Sifford, and William Siffert (Sifford). On 29 Apr 1826, signing were: George, Charles, Dewalt, John, Jacob, Peter and Henry Lentz. The Organ Church was started in 1774 and finished in 1794. The delay was caused by the Revolutionary War. Black powder was not available for blasting the rock at the quarry and oyster shells could not be obtained from the coast to burn to make the masonry lime needed for the mortar. Also, the extra manpower needed was away at war. B711- Jacob Lentz said that his grandfather B7- Jacob Lentz hauled oyster shells in a wagon train from Fayetteville to the site of the church to be burned for lime. This was after the war. The oyster shells must have been shipped to Fayetteville from the coast by barge or boat up the Cape Fear River. Peter Barringer entered for 400 acres on Dutch Creek in Rowan Co., NC, on 6 Nov 1778 (Raleigh Bk 51, p. 51) . The letter to the surveyor instructed him to survey this tract of land for Peter Barringer. The surveyor marked it 'Signed over to Bostan Lance,' He surveyed 301 acres and dated it 5 Apr 1782. The land was issued to 'Bostean Lance' on 10 Oct 1783. It appears that B-Bastian Lentz must have arrived in NC from PA in 1780, purchased the claim of land belonging to Peter Barringer and started clearing and building for his farm and home. It is possible that Peter Barringer was a friend of B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr., who arranged for him to sell to his father even before his father left PA. No doubt they kept in touch a few times each year by correspondence or by word of mouth by the wagoners who traveled back and forth hauling supplies to and from PA. This now gets both B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., and B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr., on farms about four miles apart in Rowan Co., NC, on the Cabarrus Co. line, with Organ Church about two miles from Junior and about three miles from Senior. They probably visited with each other every Sunday after church services. It appears that the Lentz brothers had each learned a trade before coming to America. Bastian Lentz, Sr., is known to have had two sons who were 'joiners,' i.e., carpenters or cabinet makers. D-Dewalt Lentz, Sr., and his son D2- Peter Lentz were tailors. Two other Lentz men, J-John Lentz and P- Peter Lentz, Sr., who lived in the area are thought to have been some kin to Bastian, Sr., and Dewalt, Sr., but the relationship has still not been firmly identified. According to a family legend that continued for many generations up to the present, the four were all thought to have been brothers but this now appears to be disproved. J- John Lentz was listed as a blacksmith in NC, and may have also been a water saw mill operator, as he owned land on Crane Creek in Rowan Co., sold it and bought a farm that had another saw mill on it, or he built a saw mill on it, down on Riles Creek in Rowan Co.. The trade of P- Peter Lentz, Sr., has not been identified but he probably was primarily a farmer, based on his land purchases.. On 12 May 1802, B- Bastian signed the marriage bond for his son B7- Jacob Lentz to marry Mary Yost, daughter of Jacob and Mary Yost. His son signed as Jacob Lentz, but his father, age 65, made his 'X' to the name 'Boston 'X' Lants, as the scribes wrote it. This was the third son to marry recently --- Devault in 1793, Michael in 1800, and Jacob in 1802. B- Bastian decided to give them some of his farm land.45,46,47,9,48 He emigrated, circa March 1780. Point of origin: from Pennsylvania.17,37 He witnessed The British General Cornwallis crossed the Yadkin River not far from Organ Church in Rowan County where his horse was shot out from under him. From there, Cornwallis went on to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, where he lost one-fourth of his army. on 2 February 1781 at Rowan County, North Carolina.17 Either Johann Sebastian Lentz or Bastian Lentz were D signatories. On 1 Jan 1789, the following Lentz people signed the Constitution of Organ Church: Bastian Lentz (Sr. or Jr.?); D- Dewalt Lentz (Sr.); Peter Lentz (B2-, age 27); and Jacob Lentz (B7- age 12). Some others known to have been friends and future in-laws of the Lentz family signed as follows: Peter Barringer, John Adam Cruse, Philip Cruse, Valentine Hornberger, George Michael Heilig, Frederick Miller, Wendel Miller, George Ludwig, (Lewis) Sifford, and William Siffert (Sifford).17 Johann was listed as Bostian Lance Jr.'s neighbor on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Bostian Lance 2 free white males of 16 and upwards, 2 males under 16, 4 females;
Bostian Lance Jr. 1 free white male of 16 and upwards, 2 females.49 As of 1790, Johann Sebastian Lentz was also known as Bostian Lance.49 Johann Sebastian Lentz was also known as John Lentz.50 He lived; Germany, PA, NC.2 He witnessed an unknown person 's death at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, on 13 September 1791.51 He and Anna Margaretha Bechtel He may have had a SECOND marriage. See 'Rowan Morriages, 1753-1868,'
p. 237: Lentz, Bostian & Sophie Frietly, 14 Mar 1797; Frederick
Miller, bondsman; Jno Rogers, wit on 14 March 1797 at Rowan County, North Carolina.34 Johann Sebastian Lentz was buried in 1807 at Old Organ Lutheran Ch. Cem., Rowan County, North Carolina; Buried in Old Organ Lutheran Church Cem, about 40 mi. north of Charlotte, NC, just off I-85. A tombstone erected by family members in recent years says: BASTIAN LENTZ
B. IN GERMANY C. 1737
D. 1807, CAPT. 3rd CO.
1st BN BERKS CO. MILITIA
PA 1777-1780
WIFE MARERETHA BECHTEL OF PA.
A photograph of the tombstone is available. A photo of the Old Organ Church and the cemetary on the church grounds is also available.
When this tombstone was erected by John Paul Lentz, probably in about 1985, not as much was known about Bastian LENTZ as we know today. He was born in 1735 in the village of Postroff, Lorraine, which is part of today's France. He left a will on 16 March 1807 at Rowan County, North Carolina; For full text of the Will, click on Sources for the General Note.52,53 He left a will on 16 March 1807 at Rowan County, North Carolina."His will gives us the names of his children: Bastian Jr. Peter, Elizabeth, Dewalt, Adam, Ana Catherine, John, Margaret, Michael and Marie.52,54,34,37 The Personal History of B- Johann Sebastian (Bastian) Lentz (NOTE: Large parts of this narrative are from LENTZ HERITAGE but heavily edited and rewritten. Also see the Personal History of his brother, Dewalt. Certain parts of that narrative also apply to Bastian.) ] B-BASTIAN LENTZ, Sr. FIRST GENERATION IN AMERICA B- Johann Sebastian Lentz, Sr., was baptized on 26 Aug 1735 in the Lutheran church of the village of Hirschland, Alsace. Citizens of the village of Postroff, Lorraine, within walking distance, were also parishioners of this church, as Postroff had no church building at the time. Possibly, 26 Aug 1735 was also the date of his birth, since babies were often baptized on the day they were born. The population was primarily German-speaking. At that time, there was no Germany in the sense of a single, unified country. Unification did not occur until 1871. Before 1871, what became known as the nation of Germany was composed of many German-speaking fiefdoms or ministates owned by various German royal families. In 1735, the area around Postroff itself was in a region belonging to the Counts of Nassau and was known as the Grafschaft of Nassau-Saarwerden. The area has a long and complicated history. Today, Postroff is in France, in the department of Moselle in the Region Lorraine, near Fenetrange. (See photo 1, which shows the original handwritten entry in his baptismal record in the Kirchenbuch (Churchbook). You will see on some English words inserted by the translator. Photo 2 shows the translator's transcription of the German handwriting, followed by the full English translation. Photo 3 shows the general location of Postroff and Hirschland lie. In photo 4. the red star shows the prceise location of Postroff. Photo 5 is composed of 5 maps, going from the general area to the specific area. Photo 6 shows Postroff and Hirschland on a general map. Photo 7 shows his signature on the ship's passenger list when he immigrated. Photos 8 and 9 show proof of his service in the Revolutionary War. Photos 10 and 11 show the Organ (Zion) Lutheran Church in Salisbury, NC, established in 1745 which he and his brother helped established, and modern-day headstones replacing the originals which were illegible or missing. Photo 12 shows a road sign in France leading to Postroff. Photo 13 is a photo of the village of Postroff from a distance. Photos 12 and 13 are compliments of James Porter of Lubbock, TX.) As shown on the baptismal records, his name at birth was Johann Sebastian Lentz. After he arrival in America, he dropped not only the 'Johann' but also usually the 'Sebastian' and became known as 'Bastian Lentz.' Variations and misspellings of his name are often seen in the old records. For example: Bostian Lentz, B. Lensz, Bastiann Lintz, Bastinn Lench, Boston Lance, and others. In order to avoid confusing readers, I will refer to him as B- Bastian Lentz, Sr. except in rare instances when I may refer to one of the variants. In the source entries themselves, however, I will use exactly whatever spelling appears in that source. (A few words should be said about German naming customs which were/are somewhat different from those practiced in America. Male babies were given a 'saint' name (in his case, 'Johann' meaning 'John') and a 'call name' (in his case, 'Sebastian'. Most of the time, 'Johann' was used for the saint name. Girls most often got saint names of 'Anna' or 'Maria'.) THE 'PUSH' AND THE 'PULL' -- WHY OUR IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS LEFT GERMANY FOR AMERICA The more we learn about conditions that prevailed in the area of Postroff for so many years the less we wonder why people there would want to leave and the more we wonder why they did not leave even sooner. There is an inertia in human behavior which is not easily overcome. Either crisis conditions at home (the push), or a powerful attraction from abroad (the pull), is required before people will act. In the simplest terms, the theory holds that migrants may be impelled to leave their homelands by circumstances that push them into fleeing intolerable conditions. Conversely, the lure of real or imagined opportunities in another land moves people to seek the better life. The push came from slowly moving forces, such as overcrowding in the late 18th and early 19th centuries when Europe's population grew by about 75 percent. At that stage, there was not enough land to provide livelihoods for younger sons, and the developing industrial revolution could not absorb enough of them. From peasant villages throughout Europe tens of thousands sought refuge in America. Those who were not skilled craftsmen became additions to this country's pool of unskilled labor. In the case of our Lentz immigrant ancestors, the push must have begun to build even earlier than this. People in the area of Postroff had suffered for many years from continual wars that swept back and forth across the Rhine Valley, from religious persecution by the French, from forced conscription of their young men by this or that army, and from these armies constantly pillaging and destroying their villages and farms. Such turmoil frequently brought on famine and disease. The turmoil began with the Protestant Reformation (set in motion by Martin Luther) which converted the established religion of Germany, Holland, Denmark, and Sweden from Catholicism to Protestantism. France, however, remained Catholic. Since France was militarily stronger than Germany, the Palatinate and other German provinces near the French border bore the brunt of all conflicts coming from all directions. King Louis XIV of France periodically invaded and devastated the Palatinate starting in 1674. Also the Roman Catholic Church occasionally gained control of Palatinate governments and subjected them to oppressive rule, and they were especially oppressive against Protestants. Most of the Palatinate immigrants to America were Protestants. The initial pull to America was exerted by the English Quaker, William Penn. Owing to an obligation that the Crown of England owed Penn's father, King Charles II of England settled by giving William Penn all the territory north of Maryland and west of the Atlantic Ocean. There was no way that Penn could personally use such a vast territory, so he traveled to Europe, particularly Germany, seeking people to emigrate to America and settle the area, where Penn guaranteed free land and full freedom of worship to 'law abiding persons who acknowledge the Almighty and Eternal God to be the Creator.' Through his benevolence, most of these Germans were directed to Pennsylvania. Thus began a series of mass migrations from the Rhine Valley that began slowly about 1690 and grew dramatically in the years before the Revolutionary War--and afterward, in the late 1700's, when Napoleon's army swept across this unfortunate area. At first the Palatine emigrants settled near Germantown (now part of Philadelphia) and then spread out into the rich farmlands in the counties just west of Philadelphia. Gradually letters were written back to Germany saying that everything Penn had told them was true and often giving extravagant accounts of life in America. These provided an even stronger pull. By 1735 the Germans began spilling over into the fertile valleys of Virginia. By 1752 there were about 90,000 Germans in Pennsylvania (PA, hereafter abbreviated to save space)--and all the good land was taken. The Germans arriving after 1750 had little hope of finding good farmland in PA. Their best alternative was to follow the Scotch-Irish into western North Carolina (NC). In NC, inexpensive and quite fertile land was still available. Thus, in the wilderness between PA and NC the Great Wagon Road appeared. At first the Great Wagon Road was a lowland path along the eastern Appalachian Mountains used by the Iroquois in the North and the Tuscaroras, Catawbas, and Cherokees in the South. After a peace treaty in 1744 the Warrior's Path became safer for travel. As the footpath widened into a road, Conestoga wagons were seen heading south. Some pioneers built their log cabins and settled along the way, but many others continued on down the Great PA Wagon Road into western NC. SEBASTIAN'S ARRIVAL IN PHILADELPHIA Sebastian Lentz arrived in Philadelphia, PA, on 14 Sep 1753 on the ship Edinburg from Rotterdam via Portsmouth, England, captained by Capt. James Russell. Bastian Lentz signed the ship's roster, proving that he was literate in German, at least, and possibly in English as well to some extent. As was required of all new arrivals in the English colonies, he took the following Oath of Allegiance to the King of England: 'We Subscribers, Natives and late Inhabitants of the Palatinate upon the Rhine and Places adjacent...will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his present Majesty King George the Second, and his Successors, Kings of Great Britain, and will be faithful to the Proprietor of this Province; and will demean ourselves peaceably...and strictly observe and conform to the Laws of England and of this Province.' (Source: PA Colonial Records, iii, p. 283.)] We, his descendants, have no way of knowing exactly what privations he and the others suffered on the long trip from Postroff to Philadelphia, but many contemporary documents survive today which describe the journey. Typical of these is Journey to PA in the Year 1750 and Return to Germany in the Year 1754 by one Gottlieb Mittleberger, translated by Carl T. Eben, New York, 1898, which describes the miserable, crowded conditions on the ships, the long delays, the 'stench, fumes, horror, vomiting, fever, dysentery, diarrhea, scurvey, cancer, mouth-rot, all of which come from old and sharply salted food and meat, also from very bad and foul water, so that many die miserably...the storms at sea, so that everyone believes the ship will go to the bottom with all on board...' When at last they reached Philadelphia after a trip lasting up to six months, most of them were ill, probably covered with one another's vomit and other filth, and most, who were redemptioners, were not allowed off the ship until they came to terms with people who would pay for their passage by purchasing their services for a number of years. Often one would have a spouse, parent, or child, who died along the way, and such people would have to pay for the passage of the deceased as well, usually by prolonging their years of service to the purchaser who paid for their passage. We have no indication that either Sebastian (Bastian) or his brother Diebolt (Dewalt) were redemptioners.They were young and single, and it is unlikely that either one lost loved ones during the journey. It is safe to say, however, that the journey was not a pleasure. B- SEBASTIAN LENTZ'S EARLY YEARS IN PENNSYLVANIA. We are not sure why Sebastian Lentz traveled to Berks County, PA, when he arrived in America, but it is known that Rockland Twp., where he apparently settled, was so named because of the rocky, poor soil, which made the land cheaper than elsewhere. Also, it should be remembered that by 1752, a year before his arrival, more than 90,000 German immigrants had already arrived in PA, and all of the good farmland had been taken. The poor quality of soil on his land and the cheaper prices for better land in NC must be what eventually provided 'the push' and 'the pull' for him to move later to NC. He is largely lost to us in Berks County, PA, but he and his brother, D- Dewalt (Diebolt or Theobald) Lentz soon show in the records of the Mertz Lutheran Church in Rockland Township where they sponsored children for each other at baptisms. Also, land records show him with land in Rockland Twp as early as 1760 and as late as 1779. Early marriage records in PA are found only in church records. During the early years of his research, B71154- John Paul Lentz, compiler/author of Lentz Heritage, employed professional genealogists in PA to search the marriage records of more than 25 churches in the attempt to find Sebastian Lentz's marriage record. None was found. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers then used another means to seek out the probable identity of Sebastian's bride. The following shows some possibilities for the last name of his known wife, Mareretha, or Marcretha. C. J. Smith (NOTE: This refers to Mrs. Carlton J. [Ruth] Smith. See Bibliography.) shows Peter Bechtel, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 on the ship 'Brother,' William Muir, captain, from Rotterdam via Cowes. Smith says that he was with his wife Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers speculated that the Bechtels may also have had a daughter named Mareretha, named after her mother, who married Sebastian. If this is correct, then Mareretha Bechtel must have been Sebastian's wife. It is believed that Sebastian and Mareretha must have married by 5 Jun 1758 or before. There appears to be some solid ground to support this belief: (1) On the tax rolls in 1779, Sebastian Lentz was the only man in the county paying taxes on 135 acres. (2) The same source shows that in 1790, Peter Bechtel paid taxes on 135 acres and was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in that year. Since no records show that Sebastian Lentz sold the 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp., we may assume that he traded it to Peter Bechtel, probably his brother-in-law, before he himself (Sebastian) joined a wagon train to move to NC. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Another clue is that a marriage record for Sebastian's brother, D- Dewalt Lentz, was found, showing that on 23 Mar 1767 Dewalt married Elizabeth Bechtel, probably a sister of Mareretha Bechtel, at the Mertz Lutheran Church, and this record shows that they also lived near the church. (3) Page 337 of Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America by Annette Kunselman Burgert also seems to support this belief: If the wives of Sebastian and Dewalt were sisters, this would be a case of two brothers of one family marrying two sisters of another family, resulting in double-first cousins. If such was the case, the two sisters probably were a prime force that kept the two families living on adjoining farms, not only in PA but also in NC. In summary, the above creates a strong feeling that Bastian Lentz, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha Bechtel of Berks Co., PA. Some of Bastian's and Dewalt's children born in PA appear in the book Pennsylvania Births , Berks County, 1710-1780 by John T. Humphrey; Humphrey Publications, Washington, DC 1997; John T. Humphrey, PO Box 15190, Washington, DC 20003; LOC Cat. No. 97-077364.. The following are the ones shown of Bastian's and his wife Marcretha (or, possibly, Mareretha: Peter (B2-) b, 29 Mar 1762, Dewald (B4) b. 26 Jun 1766, Adam (B5-) b. 2 May 1768, Anna Catharine, (B6-) bp. 15 Aug 1776. It shows that the B2-, B4-, and B5- are recorded in the church records of the Rockland Lutheran Church, Rockland Township which includes birth records form 1738. The birth record for B6- is found in the church records of St. Joseph's Lutheran and Reformed Church, Pike Township. It is not known why a birth record for B1- and B3- do not appear in this book. Could Bastian have lived in another county besides Berks? SEBASTIAN LENTZ'S SERVICE IN PENNSYLVANIA DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR On 12 Jul 1777, Sebastian Lentz took the Oath of Allegiance to the American Colonies before John Olds in Berks Co., PA, as is shown in the Berks County Oath Book, p. 7. In response to an inquiry by J. Paul Lentz, the Division of Archives & Manuscripts, PA Historical and Museum Commission sent the following: 'This is to certify that one Sebastian Lentz was commissioned 17 May 1777 as a Captain, 3rd Company, 1st Battalion, Berks County Militia, according to the evidence of an undated Battalion Return.' Commonwealth of PA, PA Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, PA, answered J. Paul Lentz's follow-up inquiry as follows: 'He was elected for three years. We do know he must have served his full three-year term until March of 1780 when new elections were held and he was not re-elected Captain. This is all we can say for sure from our records.' (SEE DOCUMENTs 9 and 10.) For additional documentation of the PA Revolutionary War military records of Sebastian Lentz, see Source No. 250. B-- SEBASTIAN (BASTIAN) LENTZ MIGRATES TO NORTH CAROLINA PA records indicate that B- Bastian (or Sebastian) Lentz left Berks Co. about March 1780, and this fits well with the records in North Carolina. The Revolutionary War, of course, continued beyond that date, ending on 19 Oct 1781. In NC on 2 Feb 1781, the British General Cornwallis crossed the Yadkin River not far from Organ Church in Rowan Co. where his horse was shot out from under him. From there, Cornwallis went on to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, where he lost one-fourth of his army. A number of NC records contain several entries which we believe refer to either B- Bastian (Sebastian) Lentz, Sr. or to B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr. All of these records are dated well beyond the end of the war and concern pensions and moneys owed to certain individuals for military service during the war or for goods supplied during the war for the war effort. Please see Source 251 for a full description. . The first record of Bastian Lentz in NC is in the Organ (Zion) Lutheran Church in Rowan Co. The minister made the following entry: 'In the year 1774 after the birth of Christ, the following members of our congregation began to build the so-called Organ Church, namely: (Here, he named 22 men, including Bastian Lentz, and ends as follows:) 'I have written this with my hand, the 31st day of January 1789.' (NOTICE: He wrote this 15 years after the church was first started. Was this Bastian Lentz, Sr., at age about 54 or was it Bastian Lentz, Jr. at age 30 This is not known but it appears to be Bastian Lentz, Jr. B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr. entered for 191 acres of land in Rowan Co. on 4 Aug 1778, B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., has about seven years without children between 1768 and 1776. Was he in NC at any time during this period? Or was he in NC in 1774? It does not seem possible for him to have been in NC at this time. He paid taxes in PA for the following years during this period: 1770, 1771, 1772, 1773, 1774, and 1775. He must not have been away from home in PA. In other words, it must have been B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr., who helped start the Organ Church in 1774 . On 1 Jan 1789, the following Lentz people signed the Constitution of Organ Church: Bastian Lentz (Sr., or Jr.?), D- Dewalt Lentz (Sr.), Peter Lentz (B2- age 27), and Jacob Lentz (B7- age 12.) Some others known to have been friends and future in-laws of the Lentz family signed as follows: Peter Barringer, John Adam Cruse, Philip Cruse, Valentine Hornberger, George Michael Heilig, Frederick Miller, Wendel Miller, George Ludwig, (Lewis) Sifford, and William Siffert (Sifford). On 29 Apr 1826, signing were: George, Charles, Dewalt, John, Jacob, Peter and Henry Lentz. Organ Church was started in 1774 and finished in 1794. The delay was caused by the Revolutionary War. Black powder was not available for blasting the rock at the quarry and oyster shells could not be obtained from the coast to burn to make the masonry lime needed for the mortar. Also, the extra manpower needed was away at war. B711- Jacob Lentz said that his grandfather B7- Jacob Lentz hauled oyster shells in a wagon train from Fayetteville to the site of the church to be burned for lime. This was after the war. On 6 Nov 1778, Peter Barringer had entered for 400 acres on Dutch Second Creek in Rowan Co., NC (Raleigh Bk 51, p. 51). The letter to the surveyor instructed the surveyor to survey this tract of land for Peter Barringer. The surveyor marked it: 'Signed over to Bostan Lance.' He surveyed 301 acres and dated it 5 Apr 1782. It was issued to Boston Lance on 10 Oct 1783. It appears that B- Bastian Lentz must have arrived in NC from PA in 1780, purchased the claim of land belonging to Peter Barringer and started clearing and building for his farm and home. It is possible that Peter Barringer was a friend of B1-Bastian Lentz, Jr., who arranged for him to sell to his father even before his father left PA. No doubt they kept in touch a few times each year by correspondence or word of mouth by the wagoners who traveled back and forth hauling supplies to and from PA. This now gets both B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., and B1- Bastian Lentz, Jr., on farms about four miles apart in Rowan Co., NC, on the Cabarrus Co. line, with Organ Church about two miles from Junior and about three miles from Senior. They probably visited with each other every Sunday after church services. The 1790 census of Rowan Co., NC., shows 'Lance, Bostion (Lentz, Bastian), with 2 free white males of 16 years and upward, including heads of families; 2 free white males under 16 years; and 4 white females including heads of families. B4- Dewalt married in 1793, B7- Jacob married in 1802, and B9- Michael would all be at home, with Jacob and Michael being under age 16, accounting for all the boys. B3- Elizabeth was living in Cabarrus Co. in 1789, B8- Margaret had her first child born 1 Jan 1800 and may or may not be at home, and BO- Maria (Mary) was single at home. This leaves two 'daughters' we are not sure about. They may have been granddaughters living with the family temporarily. The 1800 census shows Bastian Lentz, Sr., and wife 45 or over, one male age 10-16 (born between 1784 and 1790), and one female age 16-26 (born 1774 to 1784). B9- Michael married 17 Jan 1800 and shows in a separate house with his wife. This male must be a grandson or a boy living there as a laborer or hired help. We have assumed that the girl is BO- Maria born between 1774 and 1784, and, since no guardian was appointed for her after her father died in 1807, we selected 1781 as her possible year of birth. She would be 16. She would have been age 34 when she married in 1815. Maria could have had children, but we have found no records. It appears that the Lentz brothers had each learned a trade before coming to America. Bastian Lentz, Sr., is known to have had two sons who were 'joiners,' i.e., carpenters or cabinet makers. D- Dewalt Lentz, Sr., and his son D2- Peter Lentz were tailors. Two other Lentz men, J- John Lentz and P- Peter Lentz, Sr., who lived in the area were, for many years, thought to have been some kin to Bastian, Sr., and Dewalt, Sr., but the relationship, if any, was never identified. According to a family legend that continued for many years up to recently (June 2002), the four were all thought to have been brothers but this has now been disproved. DNA tests proved in 2002 that John and Peter Lentz were not related to Bastian and Dewalt. John Lentz was listed as a blacksmith in NC, and may have also been a water saw mill operator, as he owned land on Crane Creek in Rowan, sold it and bought a farm that had anoither saw mill on it or he built a saw mill on it down on Riles Creek in Rowan. The trade of P- Peter Lentz, Sr., has not been identified. On 12 May 1802, B- Bastian signed the marriage bond for his son B7- Jacob Lentz to marry Mary Yost, daughter of Jacob and Mary Yost. His son signed as Jacob Lentz, but his father, age 65, made his 'X' to the name written by a scribe (Boston 'X' Lants). This was the third son to marry recently, Devault in 1793, Michael in 1800, and Jacob in 1802. B- Bastian decided to give them some of his farm land. On 15 May 1802, Bastian gave each of these sons '100 acres by estimation,' for 'five shillings' each. Then he left two of them off his Will, Devault (Dewalt) and Jacob, and required son Michael to give bond to support his mother during her widowhood in order to inherit the home place. He signed the deed as 'bastiann lentz.' B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., prepared his Last Will and Testament on 16 Mar 1807. Please see Source 254 for the complete text. It is believed that Bastian Lentz, Sr., died in 1807. Col. Ray K. Smathers states that a severe epidemic passed through Rowan Co. in 1807, killing many older people. Smathers is a descendant of the William Smathers who married widow M. Lentz. This epidemic must have hit the elderly since J- John Lentz, Sr. died that same year. On 30 Jul 1808, Peter Lentz and William Sifford (Jr.), executors of his estate, sold to Michael Lentz of Rowan Co., NC, for $200.00, 196 acres that had been 'granted by North Carolina to Bostian Lentz.' On 17 Mar 1809, widow M. Lentz, married William Smathers. This could be widow Margaret Lentz, wife of J- John Lentz, Sr., except for information that appears in Smathers family records, which show that Mareretha Lentz, widow of Bastian Lentz, Sr., married their elderly ancestor, William Smathers. Their records also show that she survived William Smathers. Two of her grandsons and possibly a granddaughter who cared for her in her old age were said to have received the Smather farm. Apparently, however, they did not receive it outright but purchased it after the division of the estate. On 13 Jan 1810, Rowan Co. Court Minutes show the final settlement of the Will of Bastian Lentz, Sr., dec'd, by his administrators, (B2-) Peter Lentz and William Sifford, husband of (B3-) Elizabeth Lentz. (See Source 257 for details.) Several ladies who were elderly when J. Paul Lentz was compiling Lentz Heritasge grew up in the neighborhood of the William Smathers farm and could remember the houses, roads, and neighbors quite well. These ladies were 'Mrs. File,' 'Mrs. Plyler,' and 'Mrs. Plyler's sister.' Mrs. Plyler and her sister studied Rowan Co. deeds and other records and produced a rough map showing the land their ancestors inherited through their grandmother, Mareretha Lentz Smathers. This is in the vicinity of Liberty Church where Stokes Ferry Road crosses St. Matthews Road, showing both the old and new cemetaries where Lentz ancestors are buried. They show proof of the statements made by Col. Ray K. Smathers about his ancestors and widow Mareretha Lentz. Unfortunately the map would not reproduce, according to J. Paul Lentz, Lentz Heritage, Chap. IV, p. 9. (I wish I had a copy; I could redraw it and make it reproducable.--JWL) Mrs. Plyler wrote: 'This map was made from research, talk with old friends, and from our memories, having walked these roads, known and visited in these homes, and having a blood relationship to most of these people - this place is very dear to us. 'My sister Hazel and I were born in the old Barringer Mill house. Though its walls and roof are gone and the yard is now a field, some of Mother's rose bushes still grow and bloom along the old garden fence to bear mute testimony that this place was once a home.' The statement in the Will 'to make them equal with my other sons' can be explained as follows: It will be remembered from a paragraph above that in 1802 B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., sold to Devalt (Dewalt) and Jacob Lentz 100 acres by estimation for only 'five shillings' and that son Peter, listed only as an executor of the Will, was sold 301 acres on Dutch Second Creek for only 60 pounds on 26 Jan 1788 (Rowan Bk 11, p. 604), which was considered as his inheritance. The deed says that 'Bostian Lentz sells his son Peter Lents...it being a tract originally granted to Bostion Lentz by the state of North Carolina on Oct 10, 1783.' Signed: Bastinn Lentz, Witness: David J. Lentz. There was a known son named Adam Lentz, but, since no records on him have been found, it is assumed that he died early . Almost all family members show on the records of Organ Church--records of communion, signing of the church constitution, marriages, births, confirmations, deaths, and other records. Bohrer (Biblio.) reports that the first pastor of Organ Church recorded loaning books to the families of Bastian and Dewalt Lentz. Rev. Storch's diary shows, on page 23, that Dewalt and Bastian Lentz paid 18 pounds, 3 shillings to Organ Church in 1796-1798. These families were strong supporters of the Lutheran Church. Lentz Heritqage states that a Kline family, or families, appears to have had close relationships with the Bastian and Dewalt Lentz families. Bastian Lentz shows as executor on the WILL of Michael Kline, planter of Mecklenburg Co., NC., and Duval (Dewalt) Lentz shows as a witness with Jacob Kline , 1 Dec 1784, Book D, pages 125-7. A Peter Kline and Bastian arrived in Philadelphia on the same boat and sponsored children for each other. While unwed, D- Dewalt Lentz and Maria Klinin sponsored B4- Dewalt Lentz, Jr., at baptism in the Mertz Lutheran Church in PA. (Lentz Heritage, Chap IV, p. 21 addendum.) (We now know that the KLEIN-KLINE-CLINE people were actually close relatives. Bastian's and Dewalt's mother was a daughter of Moritz KLEIN who also came to America with his wife and several children. The KLEIN-KLINE-CLINE people are Moritz KLEIN's descendants.] Bastian Lentz served as bondsman for the marriage of Jacob Cline and Catharine Gobble, 18 Mar 1794 (See p. 79 of Marriages of Rowan County, North Carolina -- 1753-1868, compiled by Brent H. Holcomb; Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1986.34 He and Anna Margaretha Bechtel He may have had a SECOND marriage. See 'Rowan Morriages, 1753-1868,' p. 237: Lentz, Bostian & Sophie Frietly, 14 Mar 1797; Frederick Miller, bondsman; Jno Rogers, wit.34 Rowan Count Heritage, under 'Lentz Families of North Carolina,' by John Paul Lentz. #598 - '[Diebold] Lentz . . .married 3 Mar 1767 Elizabeth Bechtel, daughter of Abraham or Peter Bechtel by Berks County PA list for 1767. . .[Diebold] owned seventy-five acres in East District Twp joining Rockland, believed to have been traded to the Bechtel family (same belief for land owned by Bastian, assuming they married sisters). A NC deed shows Bastian Lentz, Sr sells his bro Devalt Lentz, Sr. fifty acres. From WWW Bostian family page: BIRTH: 26 Aug 1735, Postdorf in the Grafschaft Nassau-Saarwerden ; DEATH: 1807, Rowan County, North Carolina Linn, Jo White, Rowan County Register, Volume 8, Number 4, November 1993, p. 1875 Rockland twp, Berks County, PA, natur Autumn 1765.2 In 1994, Ed Dodd, one of our Lentz-Lence-Lantz-Lance researchers, and his translator discovered LDS microfilm of the church records of a little Lutheran Church located in today's Alsace-Lorraine, France, which contain the baptismal records of the American immigrant brothers Bastian and Dewalt Lentz. This church congregaton was in the village of Hirschland (in today's Alsace); many of its parishioners were residents of the little village of Postroff which lies about 1.24 miles to the north-west-west of Hirschland. (Postroff lies in Lorraine, just across the Alsace-Lorraine border.]

This church record shows their father as Hans Peter Lentz. (Ed's translator saw Hans Petrus Lentz in the handwriting, so he became known to us initially as Hans Petrus.] Their mother was Anna (Susanna) Magdalena Klein.

Villages in the area were, and still are, tiny farm villages located very near one another. The farmers' homes were in the villages, and they commuted to and from work on the farms by horse and wagon. This remains much the same today, except that now they most often commute by tractor, truck, truck or car. Although there are church buildings in Postroff today, this apparently was not so in the early 18th century when Hans Peter and Anna Magdalena were raising their family there. They were among the Postroff parishioners of the church in Hirschland..

Despite thorough search, we have been unable to find an explicit marriage record for Hans Peter LENTZ and his wife, Anna Magdalena KLEIN, parents of Sebastian and Dewalt LENTZ, in the LDS microfilm of this Churchbook. Dr. Gerhard HEIN apparently did find it, since he records fact of this marriage in his books/microfilm/CD's. Dr. HEIN shows that Hans Peter appears in the churchbook as serving as a Godparent in the years 1731, 37, 41, and 43. The following is translated directly from the typewritten German which Dr. Hein transcribed directly from the Church Book:

LENTZ, Hans Peter, a citizen of Postroff. Served as a God-parent for children in 1731,1737,1741,
and 1743. He died on 31 Oct 1786 (at 76 Years) [NOTE: To be more precise, he was 75 years, 9 months, and 13 days old at death.] He married Anna (Susanna) Magdalena KLEIN, who served as a
God-parent for children in 1738 and 1756. She died on 28 Aug 1769 when she was 58 years and 6
months of age.

Children:: 1. Johann Sebastian born 26 Aug 1735 (NOTE: the pastor added a note later, which
says "ist 1753 in Americka gezogen" which means "went to America in 1753."
We found confirmation that this is "our" man in the passenger lists of ships that
arrived Philadelphia from Germany in the 18th century. He arrived Philadelphia
on the ship Edinburg on 14 Sep 1753.]
2. Anna Catharina born 14 Mar 1737
3. Anna Margaretha born 3 Nov 1739, confirmed in 1754, served as a God-parent in
1758 and 1760. Married on 15 Feb 1763 in Hirschland to Sebastian PFLAUM, Jacob,
citizen of Postroff. [I am puzzled over the name Jacob here.]
4. Johann Theobald, born 18 Mar 1742, confirmed in 1756, served as a God-parent in
1764. [NOTE: This is "our" Dewalt Lentz, who arrived Philadelphia on the ship Boston on 10 Nov 1764.]
5. Hans Nickel, born 8 Mar 1744, confirmed in 1758, married on 12 Jan 1768 in
Hirschland to Catharina Magdalena KLEIN, whose father was Sebastian KLEIN, a
citizen of Postroff.
6. Anna Magdalena, born 4 Jan 1750, confirmed in 1764. Served as a God-parent 1766,
1767, and 1772. Married on 17 Jul 1776 in Hirschland to Hans Nickel FREY, whose
father was Hans Nickel FREY, a citizen of Postroff.
7. Catharina born 25 Sep 1746. confirmed 1762, served as a God-parent in 1768.
[NOTE: Child Number 2 must have died, with number 7 as her namesake.]
[AN ADDITIONAL NOTE OF MINE SAYS "see 51-122-126. This is the directory number on the CD leading you to the information sought.]
8. Peter, born 14 Nov 1755, confirmed in 1769. He died on 16 Mov 1780. The following
note also appears on this entry: "(auf Urlaub aus dem nass. Inf. Reg.]", which, I think,
means that he was on home leave from the Nassau Infantry Regiment when he died.
Ed Dodd's translator added that this Peter died of consumption (tuberculosis)
Elsewhere in his work, Dr. Hein identifies him as a soldier.

Since the present church structure dates from 1755, it seems that the baptisms of Hans Peter's and Anna Magadalena's children did not take place inside this building. It is highly likely, however, that they were baptized within a mile or so of that site, maybe in a barn or meadow or even within the shell of the Hirschland Church as it was being reconstructed.17
Johann Sebastian Lentz died on 3 May 1807 at Rowan County, North Carolina, at age 71.55,26 Johann died on 3 May 1808 at Rowan County, North Carolina, at age 72. "He died in 1807 [sic] when an epidemic struck his community, probably smallpox or typhoid. His burial place is not known. It was customary at that time to be buried near one's home, especially when a highly contagious disease was the cause of death." Page-Frick.37 He was buried at Zion (Organ) Lutheran Church Cemetery, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; Buried in Old Organ Lutheran Church Cem, about 40 mi. north of Charlotte, NC, just off I-85. A tombstone erected by family members in recent years says: BASTIAN LENTZ B. IN GERMANY C. 1737 D. 1807, CAPT. 3rd CO. 1st BN BERKS CO. MILITIA PA 1777-1780 WIFE MARERETHA BECHTEL OF PA. A photograph of the tombstone is available. A photo of the Old Organ Church and the cemetary on the church grounds is also available. When this tombstone was erected by John Paul Lentz, probably in about 1985, not as much was known about Bastian LENTZ as we know today. He was born in 1735 in the village of Postroff, Lorraine, which is part of today's France.34 He was (an unknown value) on 13 January 1810 at Rowan County, North Carolina.56,34 He was Type: Will Settled on 13 January 1810 at Rowan County, North Carolina.57

Family

Anna Margaretha Bechtel b. c 1737, d. s 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S1155] Ncgenweb.us, online www.ncgenweb.us, Catawba Cline.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Johann Sebastian "Bastian" Lentz.
  4. [S1327] Unknown author, LDS Film No. 0768146, Baptismal Record for B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., from 'France, Moselle,
    Lixheim Church Records, from the Baptismal Records of the Evangelical
    Lutheran Kirchenbuch (Churchbook) of Hirshland in the Republic of
    France.' All information about Bastian and his family in Germany are
    from LDS, Salt Lake City, Film No. 0768146. This film was found,
    researched, and translated due to the efforts of Mr. Edwin C. Dodd,
    2971 Coleridge Drive, Los Alamitos, CA 90720, who sent it to Mr.
    Robert A. Lentz, Decatur, AL. (LDS, Salt Lake City, Utah)
    , LDS Film No. 0768146.
  5. [S1328] Unknown author, Gotlieb Mittleberger, 'Journey to Pennsylvania in the Year 1750 and Return to Germany in the
    Year 1754,' by Gottlieb Mittleberger, translated by Carl T. Eben, New
    York, 1898.
  6. [S1329] Unknown author, Pennsylvania Archives, PA Archives, Series 3, Vol. 18, Berks Co., PA, p. 266.
  7. [S1330] Unknown author, Berks Co., PA, Grantee Deeds, Vol 7, p. 216, 26 Nov 1766. (See LENTZ HERITAGE, Chap. IV, p. 2.).
  8. [S1331] Unknown author, PA Archives Publications, PA Archives Publications, Series 3, Vol. 18, Berks Co.




  9. [S640] Department of Archives and History, Raleigh, NC, Revolutionary Accounts Miscellaneous,.
  10. [S1333] Unknown author, B-, Bastian Lentz, Sr., Verbatim text of B- Bastian Lentz, Sr., Will from Will Book F, p. 62,
    Rowan Co., NC, dated 16 Mar 1807.
  11. [S1334] Unknown author, Rowan Co., NC, Deed Book 20, p. 93 (dated 30 Jul 1808).
  12. [S1335] Unknown author, Sanford H. Cobb, The Story of the Palatines, An Episode in Colonial History (New York & London, G. P. Putnam's Sons, the Knickerbocker Press, 1897), p. 298.
  13. [S1325] Unknown author, Annette Kunselman Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Picton Press, PO Box 1111, Camden Maine 04843-1111; published in 1992).
  14. [S1336] Unknown author, Annette Kunselman Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Picton Press, PO Box 1111, Camden, ME 04843-1111).
  15. [S1321] Unknown author, Dr Gerhard Hein, Dr. Hein is a German professor/chemical engineer with the Bayer Co., who, in doing the ahnentafel of his own family, also collected virtually all the entries in all the Lutheran, Catholic, and Reformed churchbooks in Northern Alsace and a portion of Lorraine. He published this in a book which is also available in LDS Family History Centers on microfilm No. 1761447 and is also produced two CD's with the same content. I purchased the CD's. (Johann Heinrich, Schillerstrasse 12, 46047 Oberhausen, tel +49 208 863496, fax + 49 208 863431, email e-mail address, ISBN 3-00-006742-6.).
  16. [S1337] Unknown author, History of Berks County, Pennsylvania, in the Revolution from 1774 to 1783 by Morton L. Montgomery, originally published Reading
  17. [S628] James Lance, Sep 2004.
  18. [S637] Unknown author, Sanford H. Cobb, The Story of the Palatines, An Episode in Colonial History (New York & London, G. P. Putnam's Sons, the Knickerbocker Press, 1897), p. 298.
  19. [S629] Hirschland Visit, online http://home.att.net/~long.hair/bieber/hirschland/main.html
  20. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Lentz DNA Project.
  21. [S849] Annette Kunselman Burgert, Emigrants from Alsace.
  22. [S1338] Unknown author, DOCUMENT NO. 3 -- Map showing Postroff. This map was obtained first, I
    believe, by Donald M. Lance, Columbia, MO, who passed it on to Robert
    A. Lance who then mailed me a copy.
  23. [S1325] Unknown author, Annette Kunselman Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Picton Press, PO Box 1111, Camden Maine 04843-1111; published in 1992), page 337.
  24. [S1320] Unknown author, LDS, Salt Lake City, UT. The original author(s) of these records are the pastors of the church in Postroff., France, Moselle, Lixheim Church Records Records.' (NOTE: The Lixheim Church records include Postroff Church Records. The original author(s) of these records are the pastors of the Lutheran Church in Postroff ca. 1699-1791. (LDS, Salt Lake City, UT).
  25. [S1321] Unknown author, Dr Gerhard Hein, Dr. Hein is a German professor/chemical engineer with the Bayer Co., who, in doing the ahnentafel of his own family, also collected virtually all the entries in all the Lutheran, Catholic, and Reformed churchbooks in Northern Alsace and a portion of Lorraine. He published this in a book which is also available in LDS Family History Centers on microfilm No. 1761447 and is also produced two CD's with the same content. I purchased the CD's. (Johann Heinrich, Schillerstrasse 12, 46047 Oberhausen, tel +49 208 863496, fax + 49 208 863431, email e-mail address, ISBN 3-00-006742-6.), p. 209.
  26. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Rich-Brooks-Kirk and Kindred Families.
  27. [S1320] Unknown author, LDS, Salt Lake City, UT. The original author(s) of these records are the pastors of the church in Postroff., France, Moselle, Lixheim Church Records Records.' (NOTE: The Lixheim Church records include Postroff Church Records. The original author(s) of these records are the pastors of the Lutheran Church in Postroff ca. 1699-1791. (LDS, Salt Lake City, UT), P. 463.
  28. [S636] Bastian Lentz, Baptismal Record, LDS Film No. 0768146.
  29. [S632] Salt Lake City, UT, LDS Film #768146--Postroff Church Records.
  30. [S849] Annette Kunselman Burgert, Emigrants from Alsace, p. 337.
  31. [S634] Gerhard Hein, Familienbuecher Krummes Elsass, p. 209.
  32. [S1324] Unknown author, Ralph Beaver Strassburger & William John Hinke, Pennyslvania Germon Pioneers 3 Vols. Norristown, PA, 1934. (3 Volumes, Norristown, PA, 1934), Vol. 1, pp 522, 524.
  33. [S1342] Unknown author, LANCE DOC 54--1886 Map of Berks Co., PA, Received from John Paul
    Lentz. Shows location of Rockland Twp, where B- Bastian first settled
    after arriving in America.
  34. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.
  35. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, pp 1 and 2.
  36. [S849] Annette Kunselman Burgert, Emigrants from Alsace, page 337.
  37. [S1015] Page-Dunn-Frick-Eagle, online www4.ncsu.edu~lbpage/page-frick/index.html.
  38. [S628] James Lance, Sep 2004, from Eighteenth Century Emigrants, p. 337.
  39. [S1325] Unknown author, Annette Kunselman Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Picton Press, PO Box 1111, Camden Maine 04843-1111; published in 1992), p. 337.
  40. [S1344] Unknown author, PA Archives, PA Archives, Vol. 5, Series 5 (PA Archives), Pages 129, 136, 161, 165, 257, 264.
  41. [S640] Department of Archives and History, Raleigh, NC, Revolutionary Accounts Miscellaneous, Salisbury District, Voucher No. 1611.
  42. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, pages 3 and 4.
  43. [S1345] Unknown author, Henry E. Whipkey, Chief, Division of Archives and Manuscripts., A letter dated Feb 10, 1976 from the PA Historical and
    Museum Commission certifying Sebastian Lentz's militia service during
    the Revolutionary War.
  44. [S639] Unknown author, PA Archives, PA Archives, Vol. 5, Series 5 (PA Archives), Pages 129, 136, 161, 165, 257, 264.
  45. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, P. 341.
  46. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com.
  47. [S1341] Unknown author, Rowan Co. Minutes, 13 Jan 1810, The Final Settlement of the Will of
    Bastian Lentz, Sr., dec'd.
  48. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, pp. 1-5.
  49. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com.
  50. [S442] Ancestry.com, October 2003.
  51. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Margretha Bechtel Lentz.
  52. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, pp. 7,8.
  53. [S1343] Unknown author, Vol 1, p. 250, Rowan Marriage Records, Page 62, dated 16 Mar 1807.
  54. [S638] Unknown author, Vol 1, p. 250, Rowan Marriage Records, Page 62, dated 16 Mar 1807.
  55. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, p. 8.
  56. [S641] Unknown author, Rowan Co., (NC) Court, Under the date 13 Jan 1810 these minutes show the Final Settlement of the Will of Bastian Lentz, Sr., dec'd, by his adminsitrators: (B2) Peter Lentz and William Sifford (husband of B3- Elizabeth Lentz.), 13 Jan 1810.
  57. [S1346] Unknown author, Rowan Co., (NC) Court, Under the date 13 Jan 1810 these minutes show the Final Settlement of
    the Will of Bastian Lentz, Sr., dec'd, by his adminsitrators: (B2)
    Peter Lentz and William Sifford (husband of B3- Elizabeth Lentz.)
    , 13 Jan 1810.

Anna Margaretha Bechtel1

F, b. circa 1737, d. say 1824
FatherPeter Bechtel2 b. s 1710, d. bt 1768 - 1800
MotherAnna Mareretha ?2 b. s 1715, d. bt 1753 - 1816
     Her married name was Lentz. Anna Margaretha Bechtel was also known as Margretha Bechtel.3 She According to Lentz Heritage, C.J.Smith shows Peter BECHTEL,Sr.,
arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 with wife Anna Mareretha, and
they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. It is speculated that they may
also have had a daughter named Mareretha, namesake of her mother,
who married Bastian LENTZ, Sr.
Also, PA archives, Series 3, Vol.18, Berks Co., p 266, shows that
in 1779, Sebastian LENTZ paid taxes amounting to 26 shillings in
Rockland Twp on 135 acres, 4 horses, 3 cattle, no sheep, and he was
the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in the county.
The same source shows Peter BECHTEL paying taxes in Rockland Twp in
1780 on 135 acres, and he was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres
that year. In 1779, Sebastian LENTZ was the only man paying taxes on
135 acres of land in the township.
Since no records show that Bastian LENTZ sold the 135 acres he
owned in Rockland Twp, we assume he traded it to Peter BECHTEL,
probably a brother-in-law, before joining a wagon train to move to NC.
He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and
getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Also, Mertz
Lutheran Church shows that his brother Dewalt (Diebolt) LENTZ married
Elizabeth BECHTEL there on 3 Mar 1767; this indicates that they also
lived near the church.
It is believed that this may have been a case of two brothers of the LENTZ
family marrying two sisters of the BECHTEL family, resulting in double
first cousins, and that the sisters were the primary force that kept
the two families living on adjacent farms. Such a situation
also shows up with two other families that remained close for a number
of years.
This creates a strong feeling that Bastian LENTZ, Sr., married
about 1758 to Mareretha BECHTEL, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha
BECHTEL of Berks Co., PA. Anna Margaretha Bechtel was also known as Anna Marcretha Margareta Bechtel.4 Anna Margaretha Bechtel was also known as Marcretha Bechtel.2 Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID 572784E034BC8848B7BA65FC419C9B01EDD4. She was born say 1737 at France.5 She was born circa 1737 at Germany; Peter Bechtel has c 1742 Germany; Page-Frick has circa 1737 Berks County PA.6,1 She was born in 1737 at Berks County, Pennsylvania.3 She witnessed the immigration of Peter Bechtel and Anna Mareretha ? on 22 September 1752 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; Peter Bechtel arrived on the ship "Brothers," William Muir, captain, from Rotterdam via Cowes, England; Jim Lance - "One Peter Bechtel arrived Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 on the ship 'Brothers,' William Muir, captain, from Rotterdam via Cowes, England. I have not been able to determine whether or not this Peter Bechtel is the same individual as 'our' Peter Bechtel. Indeed, it is far from a proven fact that a Peter Bechtel wes the father of the girl who married Bastian Lentz."6,5 Anna Margaretha Bechtel married Johann Sebastian Lentz, son of Hans Peter Lentz and Anna Magdalena Klein, circa 1758 at Berks County, Pennsylvania; Early marriage records in PA are found only in church records. During the early years of his research, B71154- John Paul Lentz, compiler/author of LENTZ HERITAGE, employed professional genealogists in PA to search the marriage records of more than 25 churcbes to find Sebastian Lentz's marriage record. None was found. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers then used another means to seek out the probable identity of Sebastian's bride. The following shows some possibilities for the last name of his known wife, Mareretha. C. J. Smith (NOTE: RE-FIND AND SUPPLY MORE INFO TO THE READER ON THIS C. J. SMITH.) shows Peter Bechtel, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 with wife Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers speculated that the Bechtels may have also had a daughter named Mareretha, named after her mother, who married Sebastian. If this is corrcct, then Mareretha Bechtel must have been Sebastian's wife. It is believed that Sebastian and Mareretha must have married by Jun 1758 or before. There appears to be some solid ground to support this theory: (1) On the tax rolls in 1779, Sebastian Lentz was the only man in the county paying taxes on 135 acres. (2) The same source shows that in 1790, Peter Bechtel paid taxes on 135 acres and was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in that year. Since no records show that Sebastian Lentz sold 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp., we may assume that he traded it to Peter Bechtel, probably his brother-in-law, before he himself joined a wagon train to move to North Carolina. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Another clue is that a marriage record for Sebastian's brother, D-Dewalt Lentz, was found, showing that on 23 Mar 1767 Dewalt married Elizabeth Bechtel, probably a sister of Mareretha Bechtel, at the Mertz Lutheran Church, and this record shows that they also lived near the church. If the wives of Sebastian and Dewalt were sisters, this would be a case of two brothers of one family marrying sisters of another family, resulting in double-first cousins. If such was the case, the two sisters probably were a prime force that kept the two families living on adjoining farms, not only in PA but also in NC. In summary, the above creates a strong feeling that Bastian Lentz, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha Bechtel of Berks Co., PA.7,8,5,1 Anna Margaretha Bechtel married Johann Sebastian Lentz, son of Hans Peter Lentz and Anna Magdalena Klein, circa 1758 at Berks County, Pennsylvania; Early marriage records in PA are found only in church records. During the early years of his research, B71154- John Paul Lentz, compiler/author of LENTZ HERITAGE, employed professional genealogists in PA to search the marriage records of more than 25 churcbes to find Sebastian Lentz's marriage record. None was found. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers then used another means to seek out the probable identity of Sebastian's bride. The following shows some possibilities for the last name of his known wife, Mareretha. C. J. Smith (NOTE: RE-FIND AND SUPPLY MORE INFO TO THE READER ON THIS C. J. SMITH.) shows Peter Bechtel, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 with wife Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. J. Paul Lentz and his researchers speculated that the Bechtels may have also had a daughter named Mareretha, named after her mother, who married Sebastian. If this is corrcct, then Mareretha Bechtel must have been Sebastian's wife. It is believed that Sebastian and Mareretha must have married by Jun 1758 or before.
There appears to be some solid ground to support this theory:
(1) On the tax rolls in 1779, Sebastian Lentz was the only man in the county paying taxes on 135 acres.
(2) The same source shows that in 1790, Peter Bechtel paid taxes on 135 acres and was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in that year.
Since no records show that Sebastian Lentz sold 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp., we may assume that he traded it to Peter Bechtel, probably his brother-in-law, before he himself joined a wagon train to move to North Carolina. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Another clue is that a marriage record for Sebastian's brother, D-Dewalt Lentz, was found, showing that on 23 Mar 1767 Dewalt married Elizabeth Bechtel, probably a sister of Mareretha Bechtel, at the Mertz Lutheran Church, and this record shows that they also lived near the church.
If the wives of Sebastian and Dewalt were sisters, this would be a case of two brothers of one family marrying sisters of another family, resulting in double-first cousins. If such was the case, the two sisters probably were a prime force that kept the two families living on adjoining farms, not only in PA but also in NC.
In summary, the above creates a strong feeling that Bastian Lentz, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha Bechtel, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha Bechtel of Berks Co., PA.7,9 As of before June 1758,her married name was Lentz.2 Anna Margaretha Bechtel died on 13 September 1791 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 She died on 13 September 1791 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.3 She and Johann Sebastian Lentz He may have had a SECOND marriage. See 'Rowan Morriages, 1753-1868,'
p. 237: Lentz, Bostian & Sophie Frietly, 14 Mar 1797; Frederick
Miller, bondsman; Jno Rogers, wit on 14 March 1797 at Rowan County, North Carolina.5 Anna Margaretha Bechtel and Johann Sebastian Lentz He may have had a SECOND marriage. See 'Rowan Morriages, 1753-1868,' p. 237: Lentz, Bostian & Sophie Frietly, 14 Mar 1797; Frederick Miller, bondsman; Jno Rogers, wit.5 Anna Margaretha Bechtel According to Lentz Heritage, C.J.Smith shows Peter BECHTEL,Sr., arrived in Philadelphia on 22 Sep 1752 with wife Anna Mareretha, and they had a son Peter, born 20 Aug 1756. It is speculated that they may also have had a daughter named Mareretha, namesake of her mother, who married Bastian LENTZ, Sr. Also, PA archives, Series 3, Vol.18, Berks Co., p 266, shows that in 1779, Sebastian LENTZ paid taxes amounting to 26 shillings in Rockland Twp on 135 acres, 4 horses, 3 cattle, no sheep, and he was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres in the county. The same source shows Peter BECHTEL paying taxes in Rockland Twp in 1780 on 135 acres, and he was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres that year. In 1779, Sebastian LENTZ was the only man paying taxes on 135 acres of land in the township. Since no records show that Bastian LENTZ sold the 135 acres he owned in Rockland Twp, we assume he traded it to Peter BECHTEL, probably a brother-in-law, before joining a wagon train to move to NC. He may not have had time to go through the details of selling and getting a deed made before the wagon train was to leave. Also, Mertz Lutheran Church shows that his brother Dewalt (Diebolt) LENTZ married Elizabeth BECHTEL there on 3 Mar 1767; this indicates that they also lived near the church. It is believed that this may have been two brothers of the LENTZ family marrying two sisters of the BECHTEL family, resulting in double first cousins, and that the sisters were the primary force that kept the two families living lived on adjacent farms. Such a situation also shows up with two other families that remained close for a number of years. This creates a strong feeling that Bastian LENTZ, Sr., married about 1758 to Mareretha BECHTEL, daughter of Peter and Anna Mareretha BECHTEL of Berks Co., PA.5 She was 572784E034BC8848B7BA65FC419C9B01EDD4.5 She witnessed Johann Sebastian Lentz's death at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 3 May 1808. "He died in 1807 [sic] when an epidemic struck his community, probably smallpox or typhoid. His burial place is not known. It was customary at that time to be buried near one's home, especially when a highly contagious disease was the cause of death." Page-Frick.1 As of 16 March 1809,her married name was Schmetter.10 She married William Smathers at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 16 March 1809.10,1 She witnessed William Schmetter's death at Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1823. "She survived him and received his estate. Bastian Lentz, Jr bought it after her deathh. The plae remains in the Lentz family. John Irving Lentz and wife Millie built their new home near the same location hat PGC Lentz's house stood" Page-Frick.10,1 Anna Margaretha Bechtel died say 1824 at Rowan County, North Carolina; "Bastian Lentz Jr bought [William Smather's] estate after her [his mother's] death" Page Frick.11,1

Family 1

Johann Sebastian Lentz b. 26 Aug 1735, d. 3 May 1808
Children

Family 2

William Schmetter b. 1736, d. 1823

Citations

  1. [S1015] Page-Dunn-Frick-Eagle, online www4.ncsu.edu~lbpage/page-frick/index.html.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Margretha Bechtel Lentz.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Rich-Brooks-Kirk and Kindred Families.
  5. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.
  6. [S611] Jim Lance, July 2004; uploaded Nov 2002.
  7. [S633] Unknown author, John Paul Lentz, LENTZ HERITAGE (Meridional Publications, Wake Forest, NC 27587, 1986, reprinted 1990, LOC Catalog Card No. 85-081714), Chap IV, pp 1 and 2.
  8. [S849] Annette Kunselman Burgert, Emigrants from Alsace, page 337.
  9. [S1325] Unknown author, Annette Kunselman Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Picton Press, PO Box 1111, Camden Maine 04843-1111; published in 1992), page 337.
  10. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Douglas C Smathers.
  11. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.

John Lentz1

M, b. circa 1731, d. 1807
     John Lentz was occup1 blacksmith.2 John Lentz was also known as John Lance.2 He research possibilities are 1. The DNA evidence demonstrates that Peter and John can not be sons of Hans Petrus Lentz.
Many people who are interested in Lentz and/or Lance genealogy will have read the book Lentz Heritage, by John Paul Lentz. In this book, John Paul Lentz refers to four Lentz men who lived in the same place at the same time as "brothers". However, no documentation has ever been found to support this claim. Since these four men - John, Peter, Bastian, and Dewalt - seem to be about the same age, and have the same last name, and were in the same place at the same time, it seems reasonable to conclude that they may have been brothers.

It is against this backdrop that a group of people with interest in Lentz and Lance genealogy began to use DNA to determine the actual relationship among these four "brothers".

Let us start with a presumptive hypothesis that John, Peter, Bastian, and Dewalt are all brothers. Then, if we can find direct descendants who derive from each of the four brothers along the all-male line, and compare their DNA, then we should find that in all four cases the Y chromosome is identical, or at least very similar. This is what was done.

For Dewalt Lentz (D), we tested a descendant who was a 4th great grandson. For Bastian Lentz (B), we tested a 3rd great grandson. For John Lentz (J), we tested a 6th great grandson. Then for Peter (P), we tested one descendant who was a 4th great grandson (a 3rd great grandson of Peter's son Samuel (Samuel was Peter's fourth son, hence P4)) and a 5th great grandson (a 4th great grandson of Peter's son John (John was Peter's third son, hence P3)). [Note that when I say "we", I really mean that the samples were analyzed by FamilyTreeDNA.] So we have 5 DNA samples that represent a total of 36 generations (or more precisely, transmission events, the number of times a Y chromosome was passed from a father to his son).

I will neglect to demonstrate the mathematics here except to say it like this: We tested 12 sites on the Y chromosome for each of the 5 volunteers. Let's assume a mutation rate of 0.3% per site per generation (or transmission event). With 36 events times 12 tested sites per event at 0.3%, we should expect to see the following probabilities (rounded).

Number of Mutations: Probability:
0 27.4%
1 35.5%
2 23.0%
3 9.9%
4 3.2%
5 0.8%
6 0.2%
7 <0.03%
8 or more very small numbers
So how many mutations are present in our set of samples, presuming that the four are brothers? Well, there is one present in the J4 sample line (the change in DYS 389i CAUSES the change in DYS 389ii, so it is only one change, in spite of the numbers being different at two sites). Then there are an additional 4 mutations in the Bastian sample line (noting it takes 2 changes to get from 23 to 25 in DYS390). Then there are 4 more mutations in the Dewalt line. So that makes a total of nine. [Note that you do not get to "share" mutations in this case. That is to say, one mutation could not have been responsible for the change in DYS 391 in the Bastian line AND in the Dewalt line. That could be true if you thought maybe Bastian was a son of Dewalt, or something like that. But in our case, if Bastian and Dewalt are considered as brothers, then the changes must have come independently.]

So you can see that we have 9 mutations. And the probability of that happening in 36 transmission events is very close to zero (this would represent a mutation rate about 10x the normal value). So the conclusion is that these four men could not have shared the same father. The DNA demonstrates this. So why do I say that John and Peter are not the sons of Hans Petrus Lentz, instead of saying that it is Bastian and Dewalt who are not the sons of Hans Petrus Lentz? This is because the baptism records for Bastian and Dewalt as sons of Hans Petrus Lentz have been found, whereas no such records have been found for Peter and John. So it is the DNA which demonstrates that they could not have, all four of them, been sons of Hans Petrus Lentz, and it is the paper genealogy which provides the answer as to which ones were sons of Hans Petrus Lentz. Therefore, Peter and John are eliminated as being possible sons of Hans Petrus Lentz.

So from the DNA alone (a conclusion which agrees very well with the paper documentation), I concluded that Bastian and Dewalt are very closely related to each other - close enough to be brothers. John and Peter are also very closely related to each other - close enough to be brothers, but slightly more likely to be close cousins. Our technique is not precise enough to determine these exact relationships unambiguously. But it IS precise enough to determine that all four Lentz men could NOT have been brothers. between 1700 and 1800 at North Carolina.3 John Lentz was born circa 1731 at Heidelberg, Rhine-Neckar Metropolitan Region, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany.4 He married Catherine Culp circa 1750 at South Carolina.4,2 John Lentz immigrated in 1750 to Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina; arrived in Charlestown SC 1750 w bro Peter.1 NC Deed abstracts show that John owned land in Anson Co., NC. In 1764 John purchased land on Dutch Buffalo Creek, Mecklenberg Co., NC. In 1772 John Lance & Catherine, his wife, conveyed their land on Dutch Buffalo Creek to Paul Barringer. between 1764 and 1772 at Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.2 He witnessed an unknown person 's death at Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, between 1768 and 1770. Banner has before 1775.4,2 He married Margaret Abendschon at North Carolina circa 1775.2 M; Bastian was one of two brothers (the other was Diebolt, or Dewalt) who immigrated to America from Germany. Two additional Lentz men, Peter and John, were for many years believed to be brothers of Bastian and Dewalt because of longstanding North Carolina legend and also because all four settled for a while (between 1778 and 1782) in Rowan Co., NC. We are now sure, however, that Peter and John were not brothers of Bastian and Dewalt because Peter and John do not appear in the baptismal records of the same church where Bastian and Dewalt were baptized and as a result of DNA tests conducted using descendants of the four.5 John Lentz was census 1790 in 1790; In 1790 census there were 3 males listed under 16 years of age born after 1774. These were probably children by 2nd wife, Margaret Avenshine, widow of Mattheus. Margaret's maiden name is unknown at present time. These children, therefore, would not be members of Abendschon family.2 He John sold his farm on Crane Ck to Henry Moyer in 1796 and moved with sons Benjamin and Jacob to land on Riles Creek and the Stanly Cnty line to a farm with a water saw mill. John soldd 112 acres to son Jacob in 1805, died in 1807, and is believed to be buried in an old cemetery in the woods in back of todays Antioch Church. Benjamin was adminstrator and sold his farm to Peter Lentz, the tailor, on 12 Sept 1814. between 1796 and 1814.1 He died in 1807 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1,4 He was buried at in back of Antioch Church, Rowan County, North Carolina.1

Family 1

Catherine Culp b. c 1731, d. bt 1768 - 1770
Children

Family 2

Margaret ? b. c 1750, d. bt 1781 - 1840
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S767] Descendants of Hans Casper Kolb, online http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/o/b/e/…
  3. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Lentz DNA Project.
  4. [S442] Ancestry.com, October 2003.
  5. [S628] James Lance, Sep 2004.

Christopher Lyerly1

M, b. 1710, d. 1786
     The early pioneers of the Lyerly family came to the Yadkin Valley of North Carolina from Pennsylvania at the end of the French and Indian War (1756-63). They settled in Rowan, Cabarrus and Stanley counties of North Carolina. Most of them were members of the Lutheran and Reformed churches and established the Lutheran Churches of Organ, St. Peter's and St. John's in Rowan County, St. John's in Cabarrus, Bear Creek Lutheran in Stanley and Lower Stone Reformed in Rowan.

Between 1818 and 1819, after Illinois became a state, many residence of Rowan Co., NC moved to Illinois. Among them were a limited number of Lyerlys. They first moved to Union, Pulaski, Montgomery and Jackson Counties in Illinois and many later settled in Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas.

Johann Christoph Lyerly was born near Lake Constance, Germany in the southern part of the Duchy of Wurttemberg. His parents are not known for certain, however, there is reference to a Solomon Layrle born in 1681 in the same Lake Constance area that may have been his father.

Johann Lyerly came to America on the "Richard and Mary" and landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on September 30, 1754. He moved to Culpepper County Virginia and lived there for about ten years. In 1765 Johann moved to St. Lukes Parish, Rowan County, North Carolina where he and his two wives raised seven children and he eventually died in 1786.

"In 1772 the Organ Evangelican Lutheran Church of Rowan Co., NC united and resolved to solicit for themselves a preacher and a school teacher from the Hanoverian Consistory of Germany. They selected Christopher Rendleman and Christoph Lyerly. They were sent to London as deputies from the congregation from which place they journeyed to Hanover, and through Gotten, the Counselor of the Consistory, obtained a preacher and a school teacher, viz: as preacher, Adolph Nusemann; and for a school teacher, Gottfried Ahrend. Both arrived safely in America in 1773." "A History of Rowan County, North Carolina" by Rev. Jethro Rumple 1881.

In 1778 he received a grant of 400 acres about a mile above the present village of Rockwell, NC.

St. John's Lutheran Church, Cabarrus County, NC
In the old church record book, and in the old minutes of the North Carolina Synod, the congregation of St. John's is known as "Dutch Buffalo Creek Church," because its members were principally located along that stream of water, and because their first place of worship and their first graveyard had its location near the same creek, three miles distant from its present situation. The first church edifice was, of course, exceedingly plain, made of unhewn logs, and served the people the double purpose of a schoolhouse and place of worship. Both the German Reformed and Lutherans worshiped in the same building for a certain period of time, after which a more commodious building was erected for the united worship of the two denominations, about half a mile removed from the location of the present church edifice. This second building, in point of architectural style, was but little better than the former, except that it was somewhat larger, and fitted for the exclusive use of Divine worship.
About the year 1771, the members of the Lutheran Church, at the suggestion of Captain John Paul Barringer, separated themselves from their German Reformed brethren, and built their own church on the site of the upper portion of the present graveyard. The work was undertaken by Daniel Jarrett, whilst, Captain Barringer acted as the building committee. This church was built chiefly at his own expense, and out of gratitude to him the congregation had a pew constructed for the special benefit of himself and family, which was somewhat raised above the others, located in a prominent place in the church, and enclosed. He was a true-hearted and thorough Lutheran, devotedly attached to his church, and seemed to have been a defender of the rights of the German settlers there, and a leading man among them.
It was not until the year 1774 that the congregation obtained their first pastor, who had been laboring about a year and some months at Organ Church in Salisbury, and who had been brought to America by a deputation sent from Organ and St. John's Churches to Germany, in 1773. He located himself about one and a half miles east of St. John's Church, on a tract of land of his own entry or purchase, and labored faithfully all the remaining days of his life among this people. The congregation also secured about the same time the services of a Mr. Friesland as their schoolteacher.
On the 22nd of October, 1782, three benevolent members of the church council, Jacob Fagert, Marx Haus, and Jacob Thieme, paid the sum of fifty shillings, the accustomed rate, for one hundred acres of government land, on a portion of which the church had already been built, and entered it, "in trust for the congregation of Dutch Buffalo Meeting-House." This wise procedure manifested considerable forethought in those first members of the church, for the land is now valuable, and has been of much service to the congregation.
"History of the German Settlements and of the Lutheran Church in North and South Carolina," G. D. Bernheim, 1872; Pp. 249-50.

In 1772, the Organ Evangelican Lutheran Church of Rowan Co., NC selected Christopher Rendleman and Christoph Lyerly to travel to Germany for the purpose of procuring a pastor and school teacher. They were sent to London as deputies from the congregation. From London they traveled to Hanover, and through Gotten, the Counselor of the Consistory. They returned in 1773 having secured the services of Adolph Nussmann as a pastor and Gottfried Ahrend for a school teacher.

A monument erected in front of St. John's Lutheran Church in Cabarrus County reads:
"Adolph Nussmann 1739 - 1794 Born in Germany; Educated in the University of Gottingem; Called through commissioners Christopher Lyerle of St. John's Church and Christopher Rintelmann of Organ Church to minister to Lutherans in North Carolina, Arriving in the fall of 1773. Abel and Thorough Scholar; Devout and self-sacrificing minister; Died November 3, 1794; Buried about 200 yards east of this monument."
Additional Lyrely information provided courtesy of Robert Leyerle RLeyerle@aol.com.2 Christopher Lyerly was also known as Johan Christoph Lyerly.3 He was born in 1710 at Lake Constance, Kressbronn, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.2 He was prominent pioneer and planter in Rowan County, NC.3 Christopher Lyerly was also known as Johann Christoph Layrle.4 He lived; Germany, PA, VA, NC.3 He married Elizabeth Christina Holtzhauser in 1755 at Culpepper County, Virginia.2 He witnessed an unknown person 's death at North Carolina circa 1770. Based on Christoph's apparent second marriage.5 Christopher Lyerly married Anna Maria Catherina ? circa 1775 at North Carolina.2 Christopher Lyerly left a will on 12 October 1784 at Rowan County, North Carolina; Last Will and Testament of Johann Christoph Lyerly October 12, 1784
IN THE NAME OF THE HOLY TRINITY, AMEN.
I, John Christopher Lyerly, a planter in Rowan County, in St Luke's Parish, and State of North Carolina, have been ill now for a considerable time with a malignant disease, but, thank God, in good and right mind. And, because my death is quite certain, the hour, however, uncertain, it is necessary that after my death no contention may arise among my heirs, but that everything shall be negotiated according to this, my Last Will and Testament; therefore, I commend at this time, first, my soul to God, the father, who gave it; to Jesus, who redeemed it; to the Holy Ghost, who consecrated it in Holy Baptism; my body to the earth and to my friends a Christian burial.
My own estate shall, after payment of lawful debts, be divided among my heirs as follows;
FIRST, I bequeath and give to my beloved wife. Anna Mary Catherine Lyerly, first, her right of domicile in the room; second, the bed; third, the chest with all the linen and the clothes that I brought along from Germany; fourth, one cow, and then comes her third part of the movables. The management of her affairs, as long as she remains a widow, I entrust to men chosen by her and my son, Jacob Lyerly, himself, as he comes of age.
SECOND, to my eldest son, Zacharias Lyerly, because he reached his majority, received a mare, a cow and calf, but shamefully lost them gambling and drinking and entered upon a life of godlessness and even cursed his father and laid hands on him and threw him to the ground. I leave him one shilling, and exclude him from everything else.
THIRD, my son Peter Lyerly, because he left his father for a considerable time and also leads a dissolute life; notwithstanding, if he marries a wife of German Nationality, he shall have a house and fifty acres of land on both sides of the creek east and west. Should he marry, however, against my will and into another nationality, then he shall not have any land, but the young horse and nothing more. If he should receive land, however, he will get no horse or cow ahead of the others. But will enter into an equal division with his brothers and sisters.
FOURTH, to the one who goes under my name, as, John Christopher Lyerly, because he left me in his sixteenth year of his life, and is a natural son of his mother and has also received his sixty pounds, I bequeath, for the sake of his deceased mother, one shilling sterling in addition.
FIFTH, to my youngest son, Jacob Lyerly, I bequeath my plantation, farm house, and whatever belongs with it on which he can take possession in 1787, then also whatever he shall have spent for the care of his stepmother, who is given into his charge; until then everything shall remain together. If, however, his brother, Peter, shall legally marry against his father's will, then he, Jacob, alone shall have all such land as is designated in this Will, but
he Jacob Lyerly, shall be obligated to pay thirty pounds to each of his three sisters in five years time, when he shall come of age.
SIXTH, my three daughters, Margaret, Barbara and Catherine, shall share the movable goods equally.
As executor of this my last Will and Testament I hereby appoint and authorize Conrad Fredrich, and there shall be no official sale held earlier than In August, 1787, when Jacob shall have reached his age of majority.
And this is my last Will and Testament, written with my own hand, according to my conscience, as truly as if I am living, shall die, and desire to look upon the face of God, in whose name I have begun, this 12th day of October, 1784.
This is a true copy of my last Will and Testament, certified by my own hand.
/s/ J. Lyerly.2 He died in 1786 at Rowan County, North Carolina.3 He He landed at Philadelphia on Sep 30, 1754. By 1763 he was in Culpepper County, VA and by 1771 was in Rowan County where he became a member of Organ Church. . . . The story of the journey of Johan Christoph Lyerly and Christopher Rendleman to Germany on behalf of the church has been recounted (See Part ONe, p. 8).[Konrad Dillow], Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow: A History of the North Carolina Dillow Line [n.p; n.d.]. --Invalid Dates Burial: will dated 12 Oct 1784.3

Family 1

Elizabeth Christina Holtzhauser b. c 1730, d. c 1770
Children

Family 2

Anna Maria Catherina ? b. c 1715, d. bt 1787 - 1790

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, brown (braun) and stirewelt and ungers trees north carolina.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
  3. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  4. [S596] Linda Lamonte Knopke, July 2004; uploaded May 2004, sources available upon email request e-mail address.
  5. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.
  6. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi

Anna Maria Catherina ?1

F, b. circa 1715, d. between 1787 and 1790
     Anna Maria Catherina ? was born circa 1715 at Germany; 'of Germany.1' Her married name was Lyerly.1 She married Christopher Lyerly circa 1775 at North Carolina.2 Christopher Lyerly mentioned Anna Maria Catherina Lyerly in a will on 12 October 1784 at Rowan County, North Carolina; Last Will and Testament of Johann Christoph Lyerly October 12, 1784
IN THE NAME OF THE HOLY TRINITY, AMEN.
I, John Christopher Lyerly, a planter in Rowan County, in St Luke's Parish, and State of North Carolina, have been ill now for a considerable time with a malignant disease, but, thank God, in good and right mind. And, because my death is quite certain, the hour, however, uncertain, it is necessary that after my death no contention may arise among my heirs, but that everything shall be negotiated according to this, my Last Will and Testament; therefore, I commend at this time, first, my soul to God, the father, who gave it; to Jesus, who redeemed it; to the Holy Ghost, who consecrated it in Holy Baptism; my body to the earth and to my friends a Christian burial.
My own estate shall, after payment of lawful debts, be divided among my heirs as follows;
FIRST, I bequeath and give to my beloved wife. Anna Mary Catherine Lyerly, first, her right of domicile in the room; second, the bed; third, the chest with all the linen and the clothes that I brought along from Germany; fourth, one cow, and then comes her third part of the movables. The management of her affairs, as long as she remains a widow, I entrust to men chosen by her and my son, Jacob Lyerly, himself, as he comes of age.
SECOND, to my eldest son, Zacharias Lyerly, because he reached his majority, received a mare, a cow and calf, but shamefully lost them gambling and drinking and entered upon a life of godlessness and even cursed his father and laid hands on him and threw him to the ground. I leave him one shilling, and exclude him from everything else.
THIRD, my son Peter Lyerly, because he left his father for a considerable time and also leads a dissolute life; notwithstanding, if he marries a wife of German Nationality, he shall have a house and fifty acres of land on both sides of the creek east and west. Should he marry, however, against my will and into another nationality, then he shall not have any land, but the young horse and nothing more. If he should receive land, however, he will get no horse or cow ahead of the others. But will enter into an equal division with his brothers and sisters.
FOURTH, to the one who goes under my name, as, John Christopher Lyerly, because he left me in his sixteenth year of his life, and is a natural son of his mother and has also received his sixty pounds, I bequeath, for the sake of his deceased mother, one shilling sterling in addition.
FIFTH, to my youngest son, Jacob Lyerly, I bequeath my plantation, farm house, and whatever belongs with it on which he can take possession in 1787, then also whatever he shall have spent for the care of his stepmother, who is given into his charge; until then everything shall remain together. If, however, his brother, Peter, shall legally marry against his father's will, then he, Jacob, alone shall have all such land as is designated in this Will, but
he Jacob Lyerly, shall be obligated to pay thirty pounds to each of his three sisters in five years time, when he shall come of age.
SIXTH, my three daughters, Margaret, Barbara and Catherine, shall share the movable goods equally.
As executor of this my last Will and Testament I hereby appoint and authorize Conrad Fredrich, and there shall be no official sale held earlier than In August, 1787, when Jacob shall have reached his age of majority.
And this is my last Will and Testament, written with my own hand, according to my conscience, as truly as if I am living, shall die, and desire to look upon the face of God, in whose name I have begun, this 12th day of October, 1784.
This is a true copy of my last Will and Testament, certified by my own hand.
/s/ J. Lyerly.2 She died between 1787 and 1790 at Rowan County, North Carolina.

Family

Christopher Lyerly b. 1710, d. 1786

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi

Elizabeth Christina Holtzhauser1

F, b. circa 1730, d. circa 1770
     Elizabeth Christina Holtzhauser was born circa 1730 at Virginia.1 She married Christopher Lyerly in 1755 at Culpepper County, Virginia.1 Her married name was Lyerly.1 Elizabeth Christina Holtzhauser died circa 1770 at North Carolina; based on Christoph's apparent second marriage.2

Family

Christopher Lyerly b. 1710, d. 1786
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
  2. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.
  3. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi