Richard Alcorn1

M, b. 1837, d. 17 May 1907
FatherIsham F Alcorn1 b. 1793, d. 27 Feb 1846
MotherPermelia Seagraves1 b. 1805, d. 16 Dec 1852
     Richard Alcorn was born in 1837 at Tennessee; born Tennessee 1880 census.1 Israel, William, Joseph, Richard, George, Phedora, James and John was listed as a household member living with Permelia Seagraves on the 1850 Census at Randolph County, Arkansas; 451 451 Permelia Alcorn 45 female unknown; Israel P. 19 male farmer AR; William M. 17 male farmer AR; Joseph W. 15 male farmer AR attending school; Richard M 13 male AR attending school; George C. 10 male AR attending school; Phineas P 8 female AR; James L. 4 male AR; John J. 2 male AR. Later on same page, in family of Abraham Looney, was John Alcorn 24 male farmer TN.1 He married Malinda O Neal at Lyon County, Nevada, in 1875.2 Richard was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 110, Richland Township, Ozark County, Missouri. 200 206 Allcorn Richard white male 43 married farmer TN TN TN; Sarah H white female 40 wife married keeping house cannot read write MO NC TN; [next page] 203 206 -- Elizabeth E white female 18 daughter single MO TN MO; William P white male 14 son single attending school cannot write MO TN MO; Thomas M white male 7 son single MO TN MO; James M white male 5 son single MO TN MO; Mary C white female 3 daughter single MO TN MO; Julia white female 10/12 Jul daughter MO TN MO.3 He died on 17 May 1907 at Pendleton, Umatilla County, Oregon; listed in 1900 census; wife is listed as 'widow' in 1910 census.4,5

Family

Malinda O Neal b. 2 Feb 1839, d. 22 Aug 1910

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Alcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Not Stated, Randolph, Arkansas Page: 31 Roll: M432_30.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Robert Elder.
  3. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about Richard Allcorn
    Name:      Richard Allcorn
    Home in 1880:      Richland, Ozark, Missouri
    Age:      43
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1837
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Relation to head-of-household:      Self (Head)
    Spouse's name:      Sarah H.
    Father's birthplace:      Tennessee
    Mother's birthplace:      Tennessee
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Occupation:      Farmer
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Richard Allcorn      43
    Sarah H. Allcorn      40
    Elizabeth E. Allcorn      18
    William P. Allcorn      14
    Thomas M. Allcorn      7
    James M. Allcorn      5
    Mary C. Allcorn      3
    Julia Allcorn      10M.
  4. [S55] 1910 census on Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census
    about Sarah H Alcom
    Name:      Sarah H Alcom
    [Sarah H Alcorn]
    Age in 1910:      69
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1841
    Birthplace:      Missouri
    Relation to Head of House:      Mother
    Father's Birth Place:      North Carolina
    Mother's Birth Place:      Tennessee
    Home in 1910:      Pine Creek, Ozark, Missouri
    Marital Status:      Widowed
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Female
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Jasper G Alcom      27
    Lucreta m Alcom      26
    Mamie M Alcom      2
    Sarah H Alcom      69.
  5. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Richard M alcorn.

George Alcorn1

M, b. 1840, d. between 1851 and 1860
FatherIsham F Alcorn1 b. 1793, d. 27 Feb 1846
MotherPermelia Seagraves1 b. 1805, d. 16 Dec 1852
     George Alcorn was born in 1840 at Randolph County, Arkansas.1 Israel, William, Joseph, Richard, George, Phedora, James and John was listed as a household member living with Permelia Seagraves on the 1850 Census at Randolph County, Arkansas; 451 451 Permelia Alcorn 45 female unknown; Israel P. 19 male farmer AR; William M. 17 male farmer AR; Joseph W. 15 male farmer AR attending school; Richard M 13 male AR attending school; George C. 10 male AR attending school; Phineas P 8 female AR; James L. 4 male AR; John J. 2 male AR. Later on same page, in family of Abraham Looney, was John Alcorn 24 male farmer TN.1 George Alcorn died between 1851 and 1860 at Randolph County, Arkansas; could not find on 1860 census (Gary Rolph Oct 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Alcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Not Stated, Randolph, Arkansas Page: 31 Roll: M432_30.

Phedora P Alcorn1

F, b. 1842, d. between 1861 and 1900
FatherIsham F Alcorn2 b. 1793, d. 27 Feb 1846
MotherPermelia Seagraves2 b. 1805, d. 16 Dec 1852
     Phedora P Alcorn was also known as Phineas Alcorn.2 She was born in 1842 at Randolph County, Arkansas.2 Israel, William, Joseph, Richard, George, Phedora, James and John was listed as a household member living with Permelia Seagraves on the 1850 Census at Randolph County, Arkansas; 451 451 Permelia Alcorn 45 female unknown; Israel P. 19 male farmer AR; William M. 17 male farmer AR; Joseph W. 15 male farmer AR attending school; Richard M 13 male AR attending school; George C. 10 male AR attending school; Phineas P 8 female AR; James L. 4 male AR; John J. 2 male AR. Later on same page, in family of Abraham Looney, was John Alcorn 24 male farmer TN.2 As of 1860, Phedora P Alcorn was also known as Fedora Alcorn.3 Margaret and Phedora was listed as a household member living with Hamlet F Alcorn in the 1860 Census at Davidson, Randolph County, Arkansas; 379 379 Hamler [sic] T Alcorn 30 male farmer 750 1185 AR; Margaret 27 female AR; William L 10 male AR; Malissa D 7 female AR; Margaret A 5 female AR; Joseph W 4 male AR; Louis V 1 female AR; Fadora 16 female AR.4 Phedora P Alcorn died between 1861 and 1900 at Arkansas; no further information in Ancestry.com (Gary Rolph Dec 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Alcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Not Stated, Randolph, Arkansas Page: 31 Roll: M432_30.
  3. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com.
  4. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Hamler h Alcorn
    Name:      Hamler h Alcorn
    Age in 1860:      30
    Birth Year:      abt 1830
    Birthplace:      Arkansas
    Home in 1860:      Davidson, Randolph, Arkansas
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Blacks Ferry
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Hamler h Alcorn      30
    Margaret Alcorn      27
    William L Alcorn      10
    Malissa D Alcorn      7
    Margaret A Alcorn      5
    Joseph W Alcorn      4
    Louis V Alcorn      1
    Fadora Alcorn      16.

James Alcorn1

M, b. 1846, d. 27 February 1909
FatherIsham F Alcorn1 b. 1793, d. 27 Feb 1846
MotherPermelia Seagraves1 b. 1805, d. 16 Dec 1852
     James Alcorn was born in 1846 at Randolph County, Arkansas.1 Israel, William, Joseph, Richard, George, Phedora, James and John was listed as a household member living with Permelia Seagraves on the 1850 Census at Randolph County, Arkansas; 451 451 Permelia Alcorn 45 female unknown; Israel P. 19 male farmer AR; William M. 17 male farmer AR; Joseph W. 15 male farmer AR attending school; Richard M 13 male AR attending school; George C. 10 male AR attending school; Phineas P 8 female AR; James L. 4 male AR; John J. 2 male AR. Later on same page, in family of Abraham Looney, was John Alcorn 24 male farmer TN.1 James was listed as a lodger living with an unknown person 's household on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 7, Seattle, King County, Washington; Alcorn James white male 34 single laborer AR KY KY.2 He died on 27 February 1909 at Seattle, King County, Washington; could not find in 1900 census (Gary Rolph Oct 2007.)3

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Alcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Not Stated, Randolph, Arkansas Page: 31 Roll: M432_30.
  2. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about James Alcorn
    Name:      James Alcorn
    Home in 1880:      Seattle, King, Washington
    Age:      34
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Arkansas
    Relation to head-of-household:      Something other than a direct relationship (Other)
    Father's birthplace:      Kentucky
    Mother's birthplace:      Kentucky
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Occupation:      Laborer
    Marital Status:      Single
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Wm. Green      50
    Otis Abbott      30
    P.A. Dale      50
    James J. Connor      31
    Wm. Brackett      26
    Geo Brackett      32
    Wm K. Brawley      28
    James Finney      35
    John Finney      40
    Wm. E. Squires      39
    Jacob Livingston      38
    Henry Livingston      30
    James Alcorn      34
    Robert H. Turnbull      59
    Louis Alton      25
    Jack Johnson      23
    Tho's Waklen      20
    John Iseman      19
    James Storf      19.
  3. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Jame L Alcorn.

John J. Alcorn1

M, b. 1848, d. between 1851 and 1860
FatherIsham F Alcorn1 b. 1793, d. 27 Feb 1846
MotherPermelia Seagraves1 b. 1805, d. 16 Dec 1852
     John J. Alcorn probably a grandson, as Permelia's husband died in 1846.2 He was born in 1848 at Arkansas.1 Israel, William, Joseph, Richard, George, Phedora, James and John was listed as a household member living with Permelia Seagraves on the 1850 Census at Randolph County, Arkansas; 451 451 Permelia Alcorn 45 female unknown; Israel P. 19 male farmer AR; William M. 17 male farmer AR; Joseph W. 15 male farmer AR attending school; Richard M 13 male AR attending school; George C. 10 male AR attending school; Phineas P 8 female AR; James L. 4 male AR; John J. 2 male AR. Later on same page, in family of Abraham Looney, was John Alcorn 24 male farmer TN.1 John J. Alcorn died between 1851 and 1860 at Arkansas; could not find in 1860 census (Gary Rolph Oct 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Alcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Not Stated, Randolph, Arkansas Page: 31 Roll: M432_30.
  2. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.

Margaret Alcorn1

F, b. 1837, d. between 1851 and 1860
FatherGeorge Alcorn Jr1 b. 10 Mar 1810, d. 15 Feb 1894
MotherElizabeth Rice1 b. bt 1814 - 1820, d. bt 1861 - 1880
     Margaret Alcorn was born in 1837 at Greene County, Indiana.1 Elizabeth, Margaret, Thomas, Johnson, Benjamin and William was listed as a household member living with George Allcorn on the 1850 Census at Buck Creek Township, District No. 40, Greene County, Indiana; 827 827 George Allcorn [sic] 40 male farmer 400 KY cannot read write; Elizabeth 36 female KY; [next page] Margaret Allcorn 13 female IN; Thomas 11 male IN; Johnson 7 male IN; Clifford 4 male IN; William 1 male IN.1 Margaret Alcorn died between 1851 and 1860 at Greene County, Indiana; could not find on 1860 census (Gary Rolph Nov 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: George Allcorn Age: 40 Estimated birth year: abt 1810 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 40, Greene, Indiana Page: 338 Roll: M432_148.

Thomas Alcorn1

M, b. 1839, d. between 1861 and 1880
FatherGeorge Alcorn Jr1 b. 10 Mar 1810, d. 15 Feb 1894
MotherElizabeth Rice1 b. bt 1814 - 1820, d. bt 1861 - 1880
     Thomas Alcorn was born in 1839 at Indiana.1 Elizabeth, Margaret, Thomas, Johnson, Benjamin and William was listed as a household member living with George Allcorn on the 1850 Census at Buck Creek Township, District No. 40, Greene County, Indiana; 827 827 George Allcorn [sic] 40 male farmer 400 KY cannot read write; Elizabeth 36 female KY; [next page] Margaret Allcorn 13 female IN; Thomas 11 male IN; Johnson 7 male IN; Clifford 4 male IN; William 1 male IN.1 Elizabeth, Thomas, Benjamin, William and Sarah was listed as a household member living with George Alcorn Jr in the 1860 Census at Beech Creek, Greene County, Indiana; 386 386 George Allcorn 50 male farmer 0 800 KY cannot read write; Elizabeth 40 female KY cannot read write; Thomas 20 male farm laborer IN cannot read write; Benjamin T 13 male IN; William B 9 male IN; Sarah 8 female IN.2 Thomas Alcorn died between 1861 and 1880 at Greene County, Indiana; no further information found (GR Jan 2008.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: George Allcorn Age: 40 Estimated birth year: abt 1810 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 40, Greene, Indiana Page: 338 Roll: M432_148.
  2. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about George Allcorn
    Name:      George Allcorn
    Age in 1860:      50
    Birth Year:      abt 1810
    Birthplace:      Kentucky
    Home in 1860:      Beech Creek, Greene, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Solsberry
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    George Allcorn      50
    Elizabeth Allcorn      40
    Thomas Allcorn      20
    Benjamin T Allcorn      13
    William B Allcorn      9
    Sarah Allcorn      8.

Johnson Alcorn1

M, b. 1843, d. between 1851 and 1860
FatherGeorge Alcorn Jr1 b. 10 Mar 1810, d. 15 Feb 1894
MotherElizabeth Rice1 b. bt 1814 - 1820, d. bt 1861 - 1880
     Johnson Alcorn was born in 1843 at Indiana.1 Elizabeth, Margaret, Thomas, Johnson, Benjamin and William was listed as a household member living with George Allcorn on the 1850 Census at Buck Creek Township, District No. 40, Greene County, Indiana; 827 827 George Allcorn [sic] 40 male farmer 400 KY cannot read write; Elizabeth 36 female KY; [next page] Margaret Allcorn 13 female IN; Thomas 11 male IN; Johnson 7 male IN; Clifford 4 male IN; William 1 male IN.1 Johnson Alcorn died between 1851 and 1860 at Greene County, Indiana; could not find on 1860 census (Gary Rolph Nov 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: George Allcorn Age: 40 Estimated birth year: abt 1810 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 40, Greene, Indiana Page: 338 Roll: M432_148.

William Alcorn1

M, b. 1849, d. circa 1851
FatherGeorge Alcorn Jr1 b. 10 Mar 1810, d. 15 Feb 1894
MotherElizabeth Rice1 b. bt 1814 - 1820, d. bt 1861 - 1880
     William Alcorn was born in 1849 at Indiana.1 Elizabeth, Margaret, Thomas, Johnson, Benjamin and William was listed as a household member living with George Allcorn on the 1850 Census at Buck Creek Township, District No. 40, Greene County, Indiana; 827 827 George Allcorn [sic] 40 male farmer 400 KY cannot read write; Elizabeth 36 female KY; [next page] Margaret Allcorn 13 female IN; Thomas 11 male IN; Johnson 7 male IN; Clifford 4 male IN; William 1 male IN.1 William Alcorn died circa 1851 at Greene County, Indiana; if the William Alcorn age 9 1860 census is a "different" William Alcorn.

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: George Allcorn Age: 40 Estimated birth year: abt 1810 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 40, Greene, Indiana Page: 338 Roll: M432_148.

Leana Rogers1,2

F, b. October 1822, d. 16 September 1898
     Leana Rogers was born in October 1822 at Estill County, Kentucky.3,2 She married Joshua Alcorn, son of James W. Alcorn and Anna Quick, on 7 April 1845 at Madison County, Kentucky; Family Data Collection - Individual Records
about Joshua Alcorn
Name:      Joshua Alcorn
Spouse:      Leanna Rogers
Parents:      James W Alcorn , Anna Quick
Birth Place:      Madison CO, KY
Birth Date:      1825
Marriage Place:      Madison CO, KY
Marriage Date:      7 Apr 1845
Death Date:      1861.3,1 As of 7 April 1845,her married name was Alcorn.3 As of 1850, Leana Rogers was also known as Amanda Alcorn.3 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Jennings Township, Scott County, Indiana; 40 40 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 24 male farmer KY cannot read write; Amanda 27 female KY cannot read write; William D. 4 male KY; James M. 3 male KY; Mary E. 1 female KY.3 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn in the 1860 Census at Spring Valley, Shannon County, Missouri; 402 389 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 35 male farmer 0 200 IL cannot read write; Leannah Alcorn 37 female mistress of house MO cannot read write; W D Alcorn 14 male KY; James Allcorn 12 male KY; Mary Allcorn 10 female KY; Catherine Allcorn 7 female KY; John Allcorn 2 male MO.4 Leana and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn on the 1870 Census at Union Township, Fulton County, Arkansas; 3 7 Alcorn Joshua 44 male white farmer 150 125 KY cannot read write male over 21; Leaner 46 female white keeper of house KY cannot read write; Mary 20 female white domestic house keeper KY cannot read write; Catherine 17 female white domestic house keeper KY attending school; John 12 male white farmer IN attending school; Sarah 8 female IN attending school; Susan 6 female white IN attending school.5 Leana Rogers died on 16 September 1898 at Burnett, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, at age 75.2

Family

Joshua Alcorn b. 1826, d. bt 1901 - 1910
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Family Data Collection - Individual Records
    about Joshua Alcorn
    Name:      Joshua Alcorn
    Spouse:      Leanna Rogers
    Parents:      James W Alcorn , Anna Quick
    Birth Place:      Madison CO, KY
    Birth Date:      1825
    Marriage Place:      Madison CO, KY
    Marriage Date:      7 Apr 1845
    Death Date:      1861.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Rogers, Adkins, Layne, Reed.
  3. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Joshua Allcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Jennings, Scott, Indiana Page: 193 Roll: M432_171.
  4. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Joshua Allcorn
    Name:      Joshua Allcorn
    Age in 1860:      35
    Birth Year:      abt 1825
    Birthplace:      Illinois
    Home in 1860:      Spring Valley, Shannon, Missouri
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Pine Hill
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Joshua Allcorn      35
    Leannah Allcorn      37
    W D Allcorn      14
    James Allcorn      12
    Mary Allcorn      10
    Catharine Allcorn      7
    John Allcorn      3.
  5. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Joshua Alcorn
    Name:      Joshua Alcorn
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1826
    Age in 1870:      44
    Birthplace:      Kentucky
    Home in 1870:      Union, Fulton, Arkansas
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Post Office:      Pilot Hill.

William D. Alcorn1

M, b. 1846, d. between 1861 and 1870
FatherJoshua Alcorn1 b. 1826, d. bt 1901 - 1910
MotherLeana Rogers1 b. Oct 1822, d. 16 Sep 1898
     William D. Alcorn was born in 1846 at Kentucky.1 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Jennings Township, Scott County, Indiana; 40 40 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 24 male farmer KY cannot read write; Amanda 27 female KY cannot read write; William D. 4 male KY; James M. 3 male KY; Mary E. 1 female KY.1 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn in the 1860 Census at Spring Valley, Shannon County, Missouri; 402 389 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 35 male farmer 0 200 IL cannot read write; Leannah Alcorn 37 female mistress of house MO cannot read write; W D Alcorn 14 male KY; James Allcorn 12 male KY; Mary Allcorn 10 female KY; Catherine Allcorn 7 female KY; John Allcorn 2 male MO.2 William D. Alcorn died between 1861 and 1870 at Indiana; could not find in 1870 census (Gary Rolph NOv 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Joshua Allcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Jennings, Scott, Indiana Page: 193 Roll: M432_171.
  2. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Joshua Allcorn
    Name:      Joshua Allcorn
    Age in 1860:      35
    Birth Year:      abt 1825
    Birthplace:      Illinois
    Home in 1860:      Spring Valley, Shannon, Missouri
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Pine Hill
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Joshua Allcorn      35
    Leannah Allcorn      37
    W D Allcorn      14
    James Allcorn      12
    Mary Allcorn      10
    Catharine Allcorn      7
    John Allcorn      3.

James M. Alcorn1

M, b. 1847, d. between 1921 and 1930
FatherJoshua Alcorn1 b. 1826, d. bt 1901 - 1910
MotherLeana Rogers1 b. Oct 1822, d. 16 Sep 1898
     James M. Alcorn was born in 1847 at Kentucky.1 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Jennings Township, Scott County, Indiana; 40 40 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 24 male farmer KY cannot read write; Amanda 27 female KY cannot read write; William D. 4 male KY; James M. 3 male KY; Mary E. 1 female KY.1 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn in the 1860 Census at Spring Valley, Shannon County, Missouri; 402 389 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 35 male farmer 0 200 IL cannot read write; Leannah Alcorn 37 female mistress of house MO cannot read write; W D Alcorn 14 male KY; James Allcorn 12 male KY; Mary Allcorn 10 female KY; Catherine Allcorn 7 female KY; John Allcorn 2 male MO.2 James M. Alcorn married Sarah Ellen Tinder on 17 February 1870 at Hendricks County, Indiana; Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941
about James K Alcorn
Name:      James K Alcorn
Spouse Name:      Sarah Ellen Tinder
Marriage Date:      17 Feb 1870
Marriage County:      Hendricks
Source Title 1:      Hendricks County, Indiana
Source Title 2:      Index to Marriage Record 1823-1920 Inclusive Volum
Source Title 3:      W. P. A. Original Record Located County Clerk's Of
Book:      7
OS Page:      242.3,4 James and Sarah was listed as a household member living with an unknown person on the 1870 Census at Marion Township, Hendricks County, Indiana.3 James was listed as the head of a family on the 1920 Census at Enumeration District 32, Clay, Hendricks County, Indiana.5 He died between 1921 and 1930 at Hendricks County, Indiana; mother listed as widow in 1930 census.6

Family

Sarah Ellen Tinder b. 1855, d. bt 1930 - 1940

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Joshua Allcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Jennings, Scott, Indiana Page: 193 Roll: M432_171.
  2. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Joshua Allcorn
    Name:      Joshua Allcorn
    Age in 1860:      35
    Birth Year:      abt 1825
    Birthplace:      Illinois
    Home in 1860:      Spring Valley, Shannon, Missouri
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Pine Hill
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Joshua Allcorn      35
    Leannah Allcorn      37
    W D Allcorn      14
    James Allcorn      12
    Mary Allcorn      10
    Catharine Allcorn      7
    John Allcorn      3.
  3. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about James Alcorn
    Name:      James Alcorn
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1848
    Age in 1870:      22
    Birthplace:      Kentucky
    Home in 1870:      Marion, Hendricks, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Post Office:      New Winchester.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Indiana Marriage Collection 1800-1941.
  5. [S52] 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc 2010, January 1920 Internet Resources Available on line.
  6. [S53] 1930 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census
    about Florrie Alcorn
    Name:      Florrie Alcorn
    Home in 1930:      Coatesville, Hendricks, Indiana
    Age:      40
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1890
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relation to Head of House:      Head
    Race:      White
    Occupation:

    Education:

    Military Service:

    Rent/home value:

    Age at first marriage:

    Parents' birthplace:
         
    View image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Florrie Alcorn      40
    Alcorn      75.

Mary E. Alcorn1

F, b. 1849, d. between 1871 and 1910
FatherJoshua Alcorn1 b. 1826, d. bt 1901 - 1910
MotherLeana Rogers1 b. Oct 1822, d. 16 Sep 1898
     Mary E. Alcorn was born in 1849 at Kentucky.1 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Jennings Township, Scott County, Indiana; 40 40 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 24 male farmer KY cannot read write; Amanda 27 female KY cannot read write; William D. 4 male KY; James M. 3 male KY; Mary E. 1 female KY.1 Leana, William, James and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn in the 1860 Census at Spring Valley, Shannon County, Missouri; 402 389 Joshua Allcorn [sic] 35 male farmer 0 200 IL cannot read write; Leannah Alcorn 37 female mistress of house MO cannot read write; W D Alcorn 14 male KY; James Allcorn 12 male KY; Mary Allcorn 10 female KY; Catherine Allcorn 7 female KY; John Allcorn 2 male MO.2 Leana and Mary was listed as a household member living with Joshua Alcorn on the 1870 Census at Union Township, Fulton County, Arkansas; 3 7 Alcorn Joshua 44 male white farmer 150 125 KY cannot read write male over 21; Leaner 46 female white keeper of house KY cannot read write; Mary 20 female white domestic house keeper KY cannot read write; Catherine 17 female white domestic house keeper KY attending school; John 12 male white farmer IN attending school; Sarah 8 female IN attending school; Susan 6 female white IN attending school.3 Mary E. Alcorn died between 1871 and 1910 at Arkansas; could not find on 1880 census (Gary Rolph Nov 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Joshua Allcorn Age: 24 Estimated birth year: abt 1826 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Jennings, Scott, Indiana Page: 193 Roll: M432_171.
  2. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Joshua Allcorn
    Name:      Joshua Allcorn
    Age in 1860:      35
    Birth Year:      abt 1825
    Birthplace:      Illinois
    Home in 1860:      Spring Valley, Shannon, Missouri
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Pine Hill
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Joshua Allcorn      35
    Leannah Allcorn      37
    W D Allcorn      14
    James Allcorn      12
    Mary Allcorn      10
    Catharine Allcorn      7
    John Allcorn      3.
  3. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Joshua Alcorn
    Name:      Joshua Alcorn
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1826
    Age in 1870:      44
    Birthplace:      Kentucky
    Home in 1870:      Union, Fulton, Arkansas
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Post Office:      Pilot Hill.

Sallie Love1

F, b. 1825, d. between 1881 and 1900
     Sallie Love was also known as Sarah ?2 She was born in 1825 at Tennessee.2 As of circa 1847,her married name was Alcorn.2 She married John S Alcorn, son of Robert Joseph Alcorn and Angelina Lucinda Russell, circa 1847 at Tennessee.2 Sallie, William and James was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Civil District No 8, DeKalb County, Tennessee; not sure if this is the correct John Alcorn. 755 755 John Allcorn [sic] 26 male blacksmith TN cannot read write; Sarah 25 female TN; William R 2 male TN; James H. 5/12 male TN.2 As of 1860, Sallie Love was also known as Sallie Alcorn.3 Sallie, James and Thomas was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn in the 1860 Census at District No 13, Putnam County, Tennessee; 970 970 John S Alcorn 38 male blacksmith 180 600 TN cannot read write; Sallie 38 female TN cannot read write; James K P 10 male TN; Thos 7 male TN; Aaron 6 male TN; Rebecca 3 female TN; George W 1 male TN.3 Sallie, Thomas and James was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn on the 1870 Census at 20th Civil District, Williamson County, Tennessee; 16 15 Alcorn John 50 male white blacksmith -- [prob refers above to TN] cannot read write male over 21; Sarah 50 female white keeping house --; TH 18 male white -- cannot read write; Aaron 12 male white -- cannot read write; Rebecca 11 female white --; [next page] Alcorn GW 9 male white TN; Bettie 7 female white --; Sarah 5 female white --.4 Sallie was listed as John S Alcorn's wife on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 198, 12 Civil District, Rutherford County, Tennessee; 151 152 Alcorn John white male 60 married farmer cannot read write TN TN TN; Sarah white female 54 wife married keeping house cannot read write TN -- --; Rebecca white female 20 daughter single at home cannot read write TN TN TN; George W white male 18 son single works on farm cannot read write TN TN TN; Elizabeth white female 16 daughter single at home cannot read write TN TN TN; Sarah white female 13 daughter single cannot read write TN TN TN; Thomas Alcorn neighbor.5 Sallie Love died between 1881 and 1900 at Rutherford County, Tennessee; not in 1900 census where husband listed as widower.6

Family

John S Alcorn b. Sep 1821, d. bt 1901 - 1910
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree -- Alcorn's (Owner: magicianleo).
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Allcorn Age: 26 Estimated birth year: abt 1824 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 8, DeKalb, Tennessee Page: 53 Roll: M432_876.
  3. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about John S Alcorn
    Name:      John S Alcorn
    Age in 1860:      38
    Birth Year:      abt 1822
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Home in 1860:      District 13, Putnam, Tennessee
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Laurel Hill
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    John S Alcorn      38
    Sallie Alcorn      38
    James K P Alcorn      10
    Thos Alcorn      7
    Aaron Alcorn      6
    Rebecca Alcorn      3
    George W Alcorn      1.
  4. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Thomas Alcorn
    Name:      Thomas Alcorn
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1854
    Age in 1870:      16
    Home in 1870:      District 20, Williamson, Tennessee
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Post Office:      Jordans Store.
  5. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about James C. Alcorn
    Name:      James C. Alcorn
    Home in 1880:      District 12, Rutherford, Tennessee
    Age:      28
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1852
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Relation to head-of-household:      Self (Head)
    Spouse's name:      Nancy E.
    Father's birthplace:      Tennessee
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    James C. Alcorn      28
    Nancy E. Alcorn      24
    Augustus Alcorn      5
    George W. Alcorn      3
    John R. Alcorn      9M.
  6. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about James K Allcorn
    Name:      James K Allcorn
    Home in 1900:      Civil District 8, Rutherford, Tennessee
    Age:      52
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1848
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Relationship to head-of-house:      Head
    Spouse's name:      Nancy
    Father's name:      John
    Race:      White
    Occupation:      View image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    James K Allcorn      52
    Nancy Allcorn      44
    John R Allcorn      20
    James K Allcorn      18
    Mary J Allcorn      15
    Charley D Allcorn      12
    Sallie K Allcorn      10
    Beckey a Allcorn      8
    Viola Allcorn      4
    Minnie P Allcorn      2
    Willie E Allcorn      4.12
    John Allcorn      78.

William R. Alcorn1

M, b. 1848, d. between 1851 and 1860
FatherJohn S Alcorn1 b. Sep 1821, d. bt 1901 - 1910
MotherSallie Love1 b. 1825, d. bt 1881 - 1900
     William R. Alcorn was born in 1848 at Tennessee.1 Sallie, William and James was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Civil District No 8, DeKalb County, Tennessee; not sure if this is the correct John Alcorn. 755 755 John Allcorn [sic] 26 male blacksmith TN cannot read write; Sarah 25 female TN; William R 2 male TN; James H. 5/12 male TN.1 William R. Alcorn died between 1851 and 1860 at Putnam County, Tennessee; not found in 1860 census (Gary Rolph Oct 2007.)

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Allcorn Age: 26 Estimated birth year: abt 1824 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 8, DeKalb, Tennessee Page: 53 Roll: M432_876.

James H. Alcorn1

M, b. June 1848, d. between 1911 and 1920
FatherJohn S Alcorn1 b. Sep 1821, d. bt 1901 - 1910
MotherSallie Love1 b. 1825, d. bt 1881 - 1900
     James H. Alcorn was born in June 1848 at DeKalb County, Tennessee; 18 1870 census; JUn 1848 TN 1900 census.1,2,3 Sallie, William and James was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Civil District No 8, DeKalb County, Tennessee; not sure if this is the correct John Alcorn. 755 755 John Allcorn [sic] 26 male blacksmith TN cannot read write; Sarah 25 female TN; William R 2 male TN; James H. 5/12 male TN.1 As of 1860, James H. Alcorn was also known as James K P Alcorn.4 Sallie, James and Thomas was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn in the 1860 Census at District No 13, Putnam County, Tennessee; 970 970 John S Alcorn 38 male blacksmith 180 600 TN cannot read write; Sallie 38 female TN cannot read write; James K P 10 male TN; Thos 7 male TN; Aaron 6 male TN; Rebecca 3 female TN; George W 1 male TN.4 Sallie, Thomas and James was listed as a household member living with John S Alcorn on the 1870 Census at 20th Civil District, Williamson County, Tennessee; 16 15 Alcorn John 50 male white blacksmith -- [prob refers above to TN] cannot read write male over 21; Sarah 50 female white keeping house --; TH 18 male white -- cannot read write; Aaron 12 male white -- cannot read write; Rebecca 11 female white --; [next page] Alcorn GW 9 male white TN; Bettie 7 female white --; Sarah 5 female white --.2 James H. Alcorn married Nancy E ? in 1873 at Tennessee; married 27 years 1900 census.5,3 James was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 198, 12 Civil District, Rutherford County, Tennessee. [this could be him; not sure] 150 151 Alcorn James C white male 28 married [occupation not listed] TN TN --; Nancy E white female 24 wife married cannot read write TN TN VA; Augustus white male 5 son single TN TN TN; 150 151 Alcorn George W white male 3 son single TN TN TN; John R white male 9/12 Sep son single TN TN TN; Alcorn John neighbor.5 James was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Enumeration District 107, Civil District No 8, Rutherford County, Tennessee. 242 242 Alcorn James K head white male Jun 1848 52 married 27 years TN TN TN farmer 2 months not employed can read write speak English rents farm; [next page] Alcorn Nancy wife white female Nov 1855 44 married 27 yrs 11 children 10 living TN TN TN can read write speak English; John R son white male Sep 1879 20 single TN TN TN farm laborer 0 months not employed can read write speak English; James K son white male May 1882 18 single TN TN TN farm laborer 0 months unemployed can read write speak English; Mary J daughter white female Apr 1885 15 single TN TN TN at school 4 months can read write speak English; Charley I son white male Nov 1887 12 single TN TN TN at school 4 months can read write speak English; Sallie K daughter white female Jul 1890 10 single TN TN TN at school 4 months can read write speak English; Becky A daughter female white Jun 1892 8 single TN TN TN cannot read write can speak Englsih; Viola daughter female white Mar 1896 4 single TN TN TN cannot read write can speak Englsih; Minnie P daughter white female Nov 1897 2 single TN TN TN cannot read write speak English; Willie E son white male Jan 1900 4/12 single TN TN TN cannot read write speak Englsih; John father white male Sep 1821 78 widowed TN TN TN blacksmith 2 months unemployed cannot read write speaks English.3 James was listed as the head of a family on the 1910 Census at Enumeration District 118, Civil District No 8, Rutherford County, Tennessee. 82 82 Allcorn Jack K head male white 60 widowed TN TN TN English farmer general farm employer cannot read write rents farm.6 He died between 1911 and 1920 at Rutherford County, Tennessee; could not find in 1920 census (Gary Rolph Nov 2007.)

Family

Nancy E ? b. Nov 1855, d. bt 1921 - 1930

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Allcorn Age: 26 Estimated birth year: abt 1824 Birth place: Tennessee Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 8, DeKalb, Tennessee Page: 53 Roll: M432_876.
  2. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Thomas Alcorn
    Name:      Thomas Alcorn
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1854
    Age in 1870:      16
    Home in 1870:      District 20, Williamson, Tennessee
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Post Office:      Jordans Store.
  3. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about James K Allcorn
    Name:      James K Allcorn
    Home in 1900:      Civil District 8, Rutherford, Tennessee
    Age:      52
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1848
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Relationship to head-of-house:      Head
    Spouse's name:      Nancy
    Father's name:      John
    Race:      White
    Occupation:      View image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    James K Allcorn      52
    Nancy Allcorn      44
    John R Allcorn      20
    James K Allcorn      18
    Mary J Allcorn      15
    Charley D Allcorn      12
    Sallie K Allcorn      10
    Beckey a Allcorn      8
    Viola Allcorn      4
    Minnie P Allcorn      2
    Willie E Allcorn      4.12
    John Allcorn      78.
  4. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about John S Alcorn
    Name:      John S Alcorn
    Age in 1860:      38
    Birth Year:      abt 1822
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Home in 1860:      District 13, Putnam, Tennessee
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Laurel Hill
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    John S Alcorn      38
    Sallie Alcorn      38
    James K P Alcorn      10
    Thos Alcorn      7
    Aaron Alcorn      6
    Rebecca Alcorn      3
    George W Alcorn      1.
  5. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about James C. Alcorn
    Name:      James C. Alcorn
    Home in 1880:      District 12, Rutherford, Tennessee
    Age:      28
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1852
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Relation to head-of-household:      Self (Head)
    Spouse's name:      Nancy E.
    Father's birthplace:      Tennessee
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    James C. Alcorn      28
    Nancy E. Alcorn      24
    Augustus Alcorn      5
    George W. Alcorn      3
    John R. Alcorn      9M.
  6. [S55] 1910 census on Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census
    about Jack K Allcorn
    Name:      Jack K Allcorn
    [Jack K Allconn]
    Age in 1910:      60
    Estimated birth year:      abt 1850
    Birthplace:      Tennessee
    Relation to Head of House:      Head
    Father's Birth Place:      Tennessee
    Mother's Birth Place:      Tennessee
    Home in 1910:      Civil District 8, Rutherford, Tennessee
    Marital Status:      Widowed
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Jack K Allcorn      60.

Margaret Stubblefield1,2

F, b. 1831, d. circa 1866
     Margaret Stubblefield was born in 1831 at Arkansas.1 She married Hamlet F Alcorn, son of Isham F Alcorn and Permelia Seagraves, on 10 December 1848 at Arkansas.1,2 As of 10 December 1848,her married name was Alcorn.1 Margaret was listed as a household member living with Hamlet F Alcorn on the 1850 Census at Randolph County, Arkansas; 241 241 Hamlet T. Alcorn 25 male farmer 51 AR; Margaret 19 female AR; William L. 5/12 male AR.1 Margaret and Phedora was listed as a household member living with Hamlet F Alcorn in the 1860 Census at Davidson, Randolph County, Arkansas; 379 379 Hamler [sic] T Alcorn 30 male farmer 750 1185 AR; Margaret 27 female AR; William L 10 male AR; Malissa D 7 female AR; Margaret A 5 female AR; Joseph W 4 male AR; Louis V 1 female AR; Fadora 16 female AR.3 Margaret Stubblefield died circa 1866 at Randolph County, Arkansas.4

Family

Hamlet F Alcorn b. 1825, d. 1871

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Hamlet T Alcorn Age: 25 Estimated birth year: abt 1825 Birth place: Arkansas Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): Not Stated, Randolph, Arkansas Page: 17 Roll: M432_30.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  3. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Hamler h Alcorn
    Name:      Hamler h Alcorn
    Age in 1860:      30
    Birth Year:      abt 1830
    Birthplace:      Arkansas
    Home in 1860:      Davidson, Randolph, Arkansas
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Blacks Ferry
    Value of real estate:      View image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Hamler h Alcorn      30
    Margaret Alcorn      27
    William L Alcorn      10
    Malissa D Alcorn      7
    Margaret A Alcorn      5
    Joseph W Alcorn      4
    Louis V Alcorn      1
    Fadora Alcorn      16.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Owen Windrow My Exgtended Family.

Sarah J. Allen1

F, b. 4 December 1838, d. between 1901 and 1910
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     Sarah J. Allen was born in 1830 at Indiana; 30 IN 1860 census.2 She was born on 4 December 1838 at Boone County, Indiana; 12 1850 census.1,3 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 As of 28 February 1860,her married name was Griffin.3 Sarah J. Allen married Francis Marion Griffin on 28 February 1860 at Boone County, Indiana.3 Sarah was listed as a household member living with Francis Marion Griffin in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 225 215 Francis M Griffin 26 male farmer 0 300 KY married within yr; Sarah J 30 female IN married within yr; Mary C Cook 15 female domestic IL.2 She witnessed Francis Marion Griffin's death at Indiana between 1865 and 1870. Not on 1870 census; last child is 5 yrs old in 1870 census.4 Sarah was listed as a neighbor of Robert B. Allen on the 1870 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 331 344 Allen Robert B 59 male white farmer 2700 500 KY male over 21; Angelina 60 female white keeps house do; William P 28 male white common labor IN male over 21; Samuel 23 male white do do male over 21; Ella M 21 female white do; Eliza E 19 female white do; Nancy E 18 female white do; Martha E 15 female white do; Isaac 13 male white do attending school; Charles 11 male white do attending school.5 Sarah was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana. 331 345 Griffin Sarah J 30 female white keeps house 0 100 IN; Joseph A 9 male white do attending school; Nancy A 8 female white do attending school; John J 6 male white IN; Mary H 5 female white do.4 As of circa 1875,her married name was Newkirk.6 She married Isaac Newkirk circa 1875 at Indiana.6 Sarah was listed as Isaac Newkirk's wife on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 112, Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana; 129 134 Newkirk Isaac white male 57 married farmer IN KY VA; Sarah J white female 40 wife married keeping house IN KY KY; Beverly Otis white male 23 son single laborer IN IN IN; Jacob white male 2 son single IN IN IN; Griffin Joseph white male 19 step son single laborer cannot read write IN IN IN; Nancy white female 18 step daughter single housekeeper IN IN IN; John white male step son single laborer IN IN IN; Mary white female stepdaughter single housekeeper IN IN IN.6 She witnessed Isaac Newkirk's death at Boone County, Indiana, between 1881 and 1900. Not in 1900 census, wife head.7 Sarah was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Enumeration District 8, Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana. 228 223 Newkirk Sarah J head white female Nov 1838 61 widowed 5 children living IN KY KY can read write speak English rents house; Jacob son white male Jan 1878 22 single IN IN KY painter 3 months unemployed can read write speak English; Griffin John F son white male Aug 1864 35 single IN KY KY vetinary can read write speak English.7 She died between 1901 and 1910 at Boone County, Indiana; could not find in 1910 census (Gary Rolph Feb 2008.)

Family 1

Francis Marion Griffin b. 1834, d. bt 1865 - 1870

Family 2

Isaac Newkirk b. 1823, d. bt 1881 - 1900

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Sarah J Griffin
    Name:      Sarah J Griffin
    Age in 1860:      30
    Birth Year:      abt 1830
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Female
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Francis M Griffin      26
    Sarah J Griffin      30
    Mary F Cook      15.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  4. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Sarah J Griffin
    Name:      Sarah J Griffin
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1840
    Age in 1870:      30
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1870:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Female
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Post Office:      Lebanon.
  5. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1847
    Age in 1870:      23
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1870:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Post Office:      Lebanon.
  6. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about John Griffin
    Name:      John Griffin
    Home in 1880:      Clinton, Boone, Indiana
    Age:      16
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1864
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relation to Head of Household:      Stepson
    Father's birthplace:      Indiana
    Mother's Name:      Sarah J.
    Mother's birthplace:      Indiana
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Occupation:      Laborer
    Marital Status:      Single
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Isaac Newkirk      57
    Sarah J. Newkirk      40
    Beverly Otis Newkirk      23
    Jacob Newkirk      2
    Joseph Griffin      19
    Nancy Griffin      18
    John Griffin      16
    Mary Griffin      15.
  7. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about Sarah J Newkirk
    Name:      Sarah J Newkirk
    Home in 1900:      Clinton, Boone, Indiana
    Age:      66
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1834
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relationship to head-of-house:      Head
    Race:      White
    Occupation:      View Image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Sarah J Newkirk      66
    Jacob A Newkirk      22
    John F Griffin      35.

John Allen1

M, b. circa 1840, d. 9 January 1889
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     John Allen was born circa 1840 at Boone County, Indiana; "John Allen was born ca 1840 in Boone County Indiana."1,2 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 He married Eliza Jane Powell at Boone County, Indiana, on 29 November 1859.3,2 John Allen died on 9 January 1889 at Indiana.3

Family

Eliza Jane Powell b. 12 Apr 1842, d. 21 Aug 1903

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S256] Gordon W. Paul, John Boyd of Berkely County, West Virginia, p 47.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.

William P Allen1

M, b. 1841, d. between 1911 and 1920
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     William P Allen was born in 1841 at Boone County, Indiana.1 He was born in July 1844 at Indiana; Jul 1844 55 IN 1900 census.2 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 Angelina, William, Robert, Margaret, Samuel, Milly, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 218 208 Robert B Allen 50 male farmer 1600 300 KY; Angeline 50 female KY; William P 18 male farm labor IN; Robert S 16 male farm labor IN attending school; Margaret A 15 female IN; Samuel 14 male IN attending school; Milly M 11 female IN attending school; Elza E 10 female IN attending school; Nancy E 8 female IN; Monete E 7 female IN; Isaac J 5 male IN; Charles M 2 male IN.3 Angelina, William, Samuel, Marena, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1870 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 331 344 Allen Robert B 59 male white farmer 2700 500 KY male over 21; Angelina 60 female white keeps house do; William P 28 male white common labor IN male over 21; Samuel 23 male white do do male over 21; Ella M 21 female white do; Eliza E 19 female white do; Nancy E 18 female white do; Martha E 15 female white do; Isaac 13 male white do attending school; Charles 11 male white do attending school.4 He married Mahala J Brough at Boone County, Indiana, on 10 January 1871.5 William was listed as the head of a family on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 12, Center Township, Boone County, Indiana. 49 49 Allen William P white male 39 married farmer cannot read write IN KY KY; Mahala J white female 40 wife married keeping house cannot read write IN -- --; Robert G white male 7 son single IN KY --; Marion white male 5 son single IN IN; John B white male 3 son single IN IN: George S white male 1 son single IN IN.6 He witnessed an unknown person 's death at Boone County, Indiana, between 1883 and 1900. If the "William Allen" born Jul 1844 with sons John and George of correct age is 'our' Wiliam Allen -- he is listed as widowed..7 William was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Enumeration District 47, Jackson, Clinton County, Indiana. If this is 'our' William Allen; 180 181 Allen William head white male Jul 1844 55 widowed IN IN IN farmer 5 months unemployed can read write speak English own mortgaged farm; John son white male Dec 1876 23 single IN IN IN farmer 2 months unemployed can read write speak English; George S son white male Mar 1879 21 single IN IN IN farm labor 4 months unemployed can read write speak Englsh; Eva daughter white female Jul 1882 17 single IN IN IN can read wrie speak English.2 William was listed as a lodger living with an unknown person 's household on the 1910 Census at Enumeration District 52, Frankfort Ward 3, Clinton County, Indiana; No evidence to show this is 'our' William P Allen, in household of Saran Bristow (age 40) -- Allen William roomer male white 65 single IN IN IN English none can read write




Daniel Bristow
20


John Bristow
20.8 He died between 1911 and 1920 at Clinton County, Indiana; could not find on 1920 census.

Family

Mahala J Brough b. 1840, d. bt 1883 - 1900

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about William Allen
    Name:
    William Allen

    Home in 1900:
    Jackson, Clinton, Indiana

    Age:
    55

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1845

    Birthplace:
    Indiana

    Relationship to head-of-house:
    Head

    Race:
    White

    Occupation:
    View Image

    Neighbors:
    View others on page

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    William Allen
    55


    John Allen
    23


    George S Allen
    21


    Eva Allen
    17.
  3. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Age in 1860:      14
    Birth Year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robert B Allen      50
    Angeline Allen      50
    William P Allen      18
    Robert S Allen      16
    Margaret A Allen      15
    Samuel Allen      14
    Miller M Allen      11
    Elza E Allen      10
    Nancy E Allen      8
    Martha E Allen      7
    Isaac J Allen      5
    Charles M Allen      2.
  4. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1847
    Age in 1870:      23
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1870:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Post Office:      Lebanon.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  6. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about William P. Allen
    Name:
    William P. Allen

    Home in 1880:
    Center, Boone, Indiana

    Age:
    39

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1841

    Birthplace:
    Indiana

    Relation to Head of Household:
    Self (Head)

    Spouse's Name:
    Mahala J.

    Father's birthplace:
    Kentucky

    Mother's birthplace:
    Kentucky

    Neighbors:
    View others on page

    Occupation:
    Farmer

    Marital Status:
    Married

    Race:
    White

    Gender:
    Male

    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    
    View Image

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    William P. Allen
    39


    Mahala J. Allen
    40


    Robert F. Allen
    7


    Marion Allen
    5


    John L. Allen
    3


    George S. Allen
    1.

  7. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about William Allen
    Name:
    William Allen

    Home in 1900:
    Jackson, Clinton, Indiana

    Age:
    55

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1845

    Birthplace:
    Indiana

    Relationship to head-of-house:
    Head

    Race:
    White

    Occupation:
    View Image

    Neighbors:
    View others on page

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    William Allen
    55


    John Allen
    23


    George S Allen
    21


    Eva Allen
    17.

  8. [S55] 1910 census on Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census
    about William Allen
    Name:
    William Allen

    Age in 1910:
    65

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1845

    Birthplace:
    Indiana

    Relation to Head of House:
    Roomer

    Father's Birth Place:
    Indiana

    Mother's Birth Place:
    Kentucky

    Home in 1910:
    Frankfort Ward 3, Clinton, Indiana

    Marital Status:
    Single

    Race:
    White

    Gender:
    Male

    Neighbors:
    View others on page

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    Saran Bristow
    40


    Daniel Bristow
    20


    John Bristow
    20


    Gladys Bristow
    14


    Saver l Bristow
    11


    Azorah Bristow
    6


    Jacob Hallock
    71


    Daniel Cameron
    62


    William Pates
    42


    William Allen
    65


    Pat Rogers
    47.

Simeon Allen1

M, b. 24 January 1844, d. 20 July 1931
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     Simeon Allen was also known as Robert Simeon Allen.2 He was born on 24 January 1844 at Boone County, Indiana.1,3 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 Angelina, William, Robert, Margaret, Samuel, Milly, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 218 208 Robert B Allen 50 male farmer 1600 300 KY; Angeline 50 female KY; William P 18 male farm labor IN; Robert S 16 male farm labor IN attending school; Margaret A 15 female IN; Samuel 14 male IN attending school; Milly M 11 female IN attending school; Elza E 10 female IN attending school; Nancy E 8 female IN; Monete E 7 female IN; Isaac J 5 male IN; Charles M 2 male IN.4 He married Mary F Cook at Boone County, Indiana, on 30 May 1865.2,5 Robert was listed as the head of a family on the 1900 Census at Enumeration District 30, Tolono Village, Champaign County, Illinois. 175 176 Allen Robert S head white male Jan 1844 56 married 35 yrs IN KY KY carpenter 0 months unemployed can read write speak English own free house; Mary F wife female white NOv 1844 55 married 35 yrs 2 children 2 living IL OH KY can read write speak English; Annette D daughter female white Aug 1881 18 single IL IN IL at school 8 months can read write speak English; [next page] Ohme Maud daughter white female Sep 1883 16 single IL IN IL at school 8 months can read write speak English.6 He witnessed Mary F Cook's death at Tolono Village, Boone County, Illinois, between 1901 and 1910. "Sem Allen" head and widower 1910 census.7 Simeon Allen died on 20 July 1931 at Tolono, Champaign County, Illinois, at age 87.3

Family

Mary F Cook b. Nov 1844, d. bt 1901 - 1910

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Shire Family TRee.
  4. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Age in 1860:      14
    Birth Year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robert B Allen      50
    Angeline Allen      50
    William P Allen      18
    Robert S Allen      16
    Margaret A Allen      15
    Samuel Allen      14
    Miller M Allen      11
    Elza E Allen      10
    Nancy E Allen      8
    Martha E Allen      7
    Isaac J Allen      5
    Charles M Allen      2.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, INdiana Marriage Collection 1800-1941.
  6. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about Robt S Allen
    Name:      Robt S Allen
    Home in 1900:      Tolono, Champaign, Illinois
    Age:      56
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1844
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relationship to head-of-house:      Head
    Spouse's Name:      Mary F
    Race:      White
    Occupation:      View Image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robt S Allen      56
    Mary F Allen      55
    Annett P Allen      18
    Ahme Maud Allen      16.
  7. [S55] 1910 census on Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census
    about Sem Allen
    Name:      Sem Allen
    [Sam Allen]
    Age in 1910:      68
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1842
    Birthplace:      Illinois
    Relation to Head of House:      Head
    Father's Birth Place:      Illinois
    Mother's Birth Place:      Illinois
    Home in 1910:      Tolono, Champaign, Illinois
    Marital Status:      Widowed
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Sem Allen      68
    Maud Allen      29
    Blanche Allen      27.

Margaret Ann Allen1

F, b. 1 June 1845, d. 16 November 1880
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     Margaret Ann Allen was born on 1 June 1845 at Boone County, Indiana; "Margaret Ann Allen was born 31 May or 1 June 1845 in Boone County, IN, and like her older brother, married a first cousin."1,2,3 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 Angelina, William, Robert, Margaret, Samuel, Milly, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 218 208 Robert B Allen 50 male farmer 1600 300 KY; Angeline 50 female KY; William P 18 male farm labor IN; Robert S 16 male farm labor IN attending school; Margaret A 15 female IN; Samuel 14 male IN attending school; Milly M 11 female IN attending school; Elza E 10 female IN attending school; Nancy E 8 female IN; Monete E 7 female IN; Isaac J 5 male IN; Charles M 2 male IN.4 As of 8 February 1866,her married name was Powell.2 She married Milton Powell at Boone County, Indiana, on 8 February 1866.2,5 Margaret died on 16 November 1880 at Indian Grove, Chariton County, Missouri, at age 35. "They. . .later moved near Indian Grove MO where Margaret died 16 Nov 1880 at age 35 of typhoid fever.".2,6

Family

Milton Powell b. 9 Sep 1847, d. 30 Jan 1920

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  3. [S256] Gordon W. Paul, John Boyd of Berkely County, West Virginia, p 47.
  4. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Age in 1860:      14
    Birth Year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robert B Allen      50
    Angeline Allen      50
    William P Allen      18
    Robert S Allen      16
    Margaret A Allen      15
    Samuel Allen      14
    Miller M Allen      11
    Elza E Allen      10
    Nancy E Allen      8
    Martha E Allen      7
    Isaac J Allen      5
    Charles M Allen      2.
  5. [S256] Gordon W. Paul, John Boyd of Berkely County, West Virginia, p 47-48.
  6. [S256] Gordon W. Paul, John Boyd of Berkely County, West Virginia, p 48.

Samuel Allen1

M, b. 1846, d. between 1881 and 1900
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     Samuel Allen was born in 1846 at Indiana.1 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 Angelina, William, Robert, Margaret, Samuel, Milly, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 218 208 Robert B Allen 50 male farmer 1600 300 KY; Angeline 50 female KY; William P 18 male farm labor IN; Robert S 16 male farm labor IN attending school; Margaret A 15 female IN; Samuel 14 male IN attending school; Milly M 11 female IN attending school; Elza E 10 female IN attending school; Nancy E 8 female IN; Monete E 7 female IN; Isaac J 5 male IN; Charles M 2 male IN.2 Angelina, William, Samuel, Marena, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1870 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 331 344 Allen Robert B 59 male white farmer 2700 500 KY male over 21; Angelina 60 female white keeps house do; William P 28 male white common labor IN male over 21; Samuel 23 male white do do male over 21; Ella M 21 female white do; Eliza E 19 female white do; Nancy E 18 female white do; Martha E 15 female white do; Isaac 13 male white do attending school; Charles 11 male white do attending school.3 Samuel was listed as a son in Albert Allen's household on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 118, Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 16 16 Allen Albert white male 69 married farmer KY KY KY; [next page] 16 16 Allen Angeline white female 70 wife married keeping house KY KY KY; Samuel white male 30 son single farmer IN KY KY; Nancy white female 28 daugter single at school IN KY KY.4 Samuel Allen died between 1881 and 1900 at Boone County, Indiana; not in 1900 census. He married Ocie O Good at Boone County, Indiana, on 10 July 1901.5

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Age in 1860:      14
    Birth Year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robert B Allen      50
    Angeline Allen      50
    William P Allen      18
    Robert S Allen      16
    Margaret A Allen      15
    Samuel Allen      14
    Miller M Allen      11
    Elza E Allen      10
    Nancy E Allen      8
    Martha E Allen      7
    Isaac J Allen      5
    Charles M Allen      2.
  3. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1847
    Age in 1870:      23
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1870:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Post Office:      Lebanon.
  4. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Home in 1880:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Age:      30
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1850
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relation to Head of Household:      Son
    Father's Name:      Albert
    Father's birthplace:      Kentucky
    Mother's Name:      Angelina
    Mother's birthplace:      Kentucky
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Occupation:      Farmer
    Marital Status:      Single
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Albert Allen      69
    Angelina Allen      70
    Samuel Allen      30
    Nancy Allen      28.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.

Marena Allen1

F, b. 1848, d. between 1921 and 1930
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     Marena Allen was also known as Milly Marena Allen.2 She was born in 1848 at Indiana.1 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 Angelina, William, Robert, Margaret, Samuel, Milly, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 218 208 Robert B Allen 50 male farmer 1600 300 KY; Angeline 50 female KY; William P 18 male farm labor IN; Robert S 16 male farm labor IN attending school; Margaret A 15 female IN; Samuel 14 male IN attending school; Milly M 11 female IN attending school; Elza E 10 female IN attending school; Nancy E 8 female IN; Monete E 7 female IN; Isaac J 5 male IN; Charles M 2 male IN.3 As of 1870, Marena Allen was also known as Ella M Allen.4 Angelina, William, Samuel, Marena, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1870 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 331 344 Allen Robert B 59 male white farmer 2700 500 KY male over 21; Angelina 60 female white keeps house do; William P 28 male white common labor IN male over 21; Samuel 23 male white do do male over 21; Ella M 21 female white do; Eliza E 19 female white do; Nancy E 18 female white do; Martha E 15 female white do; Isaac 13 male white do attending school; Charles 11 male white do attending school.4 As of 1871, Marena Allen was also known as Amelia M Allen.5 As of 3 August 1871,her married name was Bates.2 She married William E Bates at Boone County, Indiana, on 3 August 1871.2 As of 1880, Marena Allen was also known as Milla M Bates.6 Milla was listed as William E Bates's wife on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 112, Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana; 222 229 Bates William E white male 35 married farmer OH OH PA; Milla M white female 30 wife married keeping house IN KY KY; Bernetta white female 8 daughter single IN OH IN; Minta H white female 6 daughter single IN OH IN; Stella white female 4 daughter single IN OH IN; John M white male 2 son single IN OH IN; Robert O white male 3/12 Mar son single IN OH IN.6 Milla was listed as William E Bates's wife on the 1900 Census at Enumeration District 8, Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana; 298 299 Bates William E white male Sep 1844 55 married 28 years OH OH PA farmer can read write speak English own free farm; Millie M wife white female Apr 1848 52 married 28 yrs 6 children 6 living IN KY KY can read write speak English; Robert O son male white Mar 1880 20 single IN OH IN farm laborer 3 months unemployed can read write speak English; Kinnie daughter white female Feb 1883 17 single IN OH IN can read write speak English; Hardesty Isaac son in law white male May 1870 30 married 7 yrs IL unknown unknown farm laborer 6 months unemployed can read write speak English; Bernetta daughter white female May 1872 28 married 7 yrs 1 child 1 living IN OH IN can read write speak English; Bertha B granddaughter white female Jun 1893 6 IN IL IN.7 Milla was listed as William E Bates's wife on the 1910 Census at Enumeration District 8, Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana; 79 79 Bates William E head male white 65 married twice 39 yrs present marriage OH OH PA English own income can read write own free farm; Millie M wife female white 62 married once 39 yrs 6 children 6 living IN KY KY English house-keeper own home can read write; Robert O son male white 29 single IN OH IN English farmer general farm own account can read write speak English; Hardesty Bernettie daughter female white 37 widowed 1 child 1 living IN OH IN English assistant housekeeper own home can read write; Bertah B granddaughter female white 16 single IN IL IN English assistant housekeeper own home can read write.8 Milla was listed as William E Bates's wife on the 1920 Census at Enumeration District 8, Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana; 24 24 Bates William E head own free male white 75 married can read cannot write OH OH PA speaks English none; Millie M wife female white 71 married can read write IN KY KY speaks English none; Hardesty Nettie daughter female white 47 widowed can read write IN OH IN speaks English none.9 Marena Allen died between 1921 and 1930 at Clinton Township, Boone County, Indiana; not found on 1930 census.

Family

William E Bates b. 1845, d. bt 1921 - 1930

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  3. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Age in 1860:      14
    Birth Year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robert B Allen      50
    Angeline Allen      50
    William P Allen      18
    Robert S Allen      16
    Margaret A Allen      15
    Samuel Allen      14
    Miller M Allen      11
    Elza E Allen      10
    Nancy E Allen      8
    Martha E Allen      7
    Isaac J Allen      5
    Charles M Allen      2.
  4. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1847
    Age in 1870:      23
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1870:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Post Office:      Lebanon.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941
    about William E Bates
    Name:      William E Bates
    Spouse Name:      Amelia M Allen
    Marriage Date:      3 Aug 1871
    Marriage County:      Boone
    Source Title 1:      Boone County, Indiana
    Source Title 2:      Index to Marriage Records 1844 - 1920 Inclusive Vo
    Source Title 3:      W. P. A. Original Record Located: County Clerk's O
    Book:      C-5
    OS Page:      563.
  6. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about William E. Bates
    Name:      William E. Bates
    Home in 1880:      Clinton, Boone, Indiana
    Age:      35
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1845
    Birthplace:      Ohio
    Relation to Head of Household:      Self (Head)
    Spouse's Name:      Milla M.
    Father's birthplace:      Ohio
    Mother's birthplace:      Pennsylvania
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Occupation:      Farmer
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    William E. Bates      35
    Milla M. Bates      30
    Bernetta Bates      8
    Minta H. Bates      6
    Stella      4
    John M.      2
    Robert O.      3M
         
    View
    Original
    Record

    View original image.
  7. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about William E Bates
    Name:      William E Bates
    Home in 1900:      Clinton, Boone, Indiana
    Age:      55
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1845
    Birthplace:      Ohio
    Relationship to head-of-house:      Head
    Spouse's Name:      Millie M
    Race:      White
    Occupation:      View Image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    William E Bates      55
    Millie M Bates      52
    Robert O Bates      20
    Kinnie Bates      17
    Isaac Hardesty      30
    Bernetta Hardesty      28
    Bertha B Hardesty      6.
  8. [S55] 1910 census on Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census
    about William E Bates
    Name:      William E Bates
    Age in 1910:      65
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1845
    Birthplace:      Ohio
    Relation to Head of House:      Head
    Father's Birth Place:      Ohio
    Mother's Birth Place:      Pennsylvania
    Spouse's Name:      Millie M
    Home in 1910:      Clinton, Boone, Indiana
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    William E Bates      65
    Millie M Bates      62
    Robert O Bates      29
    Burnettie Hardesty      37
    Bertha B Hardesty      16.
  9. [S52] 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc 2010, January 1920 Internet Resources Available on line.

Eliza E. Allen1

F, b. January 1850, d. between 1921 and 1930
FatherRobert B. Allen1 b. 1812, d. 8 May 1882
MotherAngelina Powell1 b. 10 Sep 1812, d. 8 May 1881
     Eliza E. Allen was born in January 1850 at Indiana; Jan 1850 IN 1900 census.1,2 Angelina, Sarah, John, William, Simeon, Margaret, Samuel, Marena and Eliza was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1850 Census at District No 7, Boone County, Indiana; 683 694 Robert B Allen 38 male farmer KY; Angelina 38 female KY; Sarah J. 12 female IN attending school; John 10 male IN attending school; William 9 male IN; Simeon 7 male IN; Margaret Ann 6 female IN; Samuel 4 male IN; Marena 2 female IN; Eliza A. 3/12 female IN.1 Angelina, William, Robert, Margaret, Samuel, Milly, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen in the 1860 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 218 208 Robert B Allen 50 male farmer 1600 300 KY; Angeline 50 female KY; William P 18 male farm labor IN; Robert S 16 male farm labor IN attending school; Margaret A 15 female IN; Samuel 14 male IN attending school; Milly M 11 female IN attending school; Elza E 10 female IN attending school; Nancy E 8 female IN; Monete E 7 female IN; Isaac J 5 male IN; Charles M 2 male IN.3 Angelina, William, Samuel, Marena, Eliza, Nancy, Martha, Isaac and Charles was listed as a household member living with Robert B. Allen on the 1870 Census at Center Township, Boone County, Indiana; 331 344 Allen Robert B 59 male white farmer 2700 500 KY male over 21; Angelina 60 female white keeps house do; William P 28 male white common labor IN male over 21; Samuel 23 male white do do male over 21; Ella M 21 female white do; Eliza E 19 female white do; Nancy E 18 female white do; Martha E 15 female white do; Isaac 13 male white do attending school; Charles 11 male white do attending school.4 As of 2 September 1875,her married name was Hamilton.5 Eliza E. Allen married Benjamin Hamilton on 2 September 1875 at Boone County, Indiana.5 Eliza was listed as Benjamin Hamilton's wife on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 115, Sugar Creek Township, Boone County, Indiana; 147 152 Hamilton B F white male 30 married farming IN OH OH; Eliza white female 28 wife married keeping house IN KY KY; Oliver P white male 1 son single IN IN IN; Allen Isaac white male 23 boarder married working on farm IN IN IN; Clarissa white female 17 wife married keeping house IN IN IN; Ella white female 3/12 Feb dau single MO IN IN.6 Eliza was listed as Benjamin Hamilton's wife on the 1900 Census at Enumeration District 105, Lauramie Township, Tippecanoe County, Indiana; 70 71 Hamilton Benjamin head white male Feb 1848 52 married 22 yrs IN OH OH farmer own account can read cannot write can speak English own mortgaged farm; Eliza E wife white female Jan 1850 50 married 22 yrs 5 children 3 living IN KY KY can read write speak English; Eber son white male Dec 1881 18 single IN IN IN farm laborer can read write speak English; Agnes daughter female white Jun 1884 15 single IN IN IN at school 7 months can read write speak English; Effie daughter female white Jan 1890 10 single IN IN IN at school 7 months can read write speak English.2 Eliza was listed as Benjamin Hamilton's wife on the 1910 Census at Enumeration District 106, Jefferson Township, Putnam County, Indiana; 183 184 Hamilton Benj F head male white 62 married once 33 yrs IN OH OH English farmer own account can read canno write own mortaged farm; Eliza E wife female white 60 married once 33 yrs 5 children 3 living IN KY KY English none can read write; Ettis M granddaughter female white 5 single IN IN IN none not in school.7 Eliza was listed as the head of a family on the 1920 Census at Enumeration District 185, Lauramie Township, Tippecanoe County, Indiana. 149 150 Hamilton Eliza widow own free female white 69 widowed can read write IN KY KY speaks English none; Ester daughter [sic] female white 15 single attending school can read write IN IN IN speaks English none.8 She died between 1921 and 1930 at Tippecanoe County, Indiana; not found on 1930 census (Gary Rolph Feb 2008.)

Family

Benjamin Hamilton b. Feb 1848, d. bt 1911 - 1919

Citations

  1. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Angelina Allen Age: 38 Estimated birth year: abt 1812 Birth place: Kentucky Gender: Female Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 7, Boone, Indiana Page: 109 Roll: M432_136.
  2. [S148] 1900 United States Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census
    about Eliza E Hamilton
    Name:      Eliza E Hamilton
    Home in 1900:      Lauramie, Tippecanoe, Indiana
    Age:      50
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1850
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relationship to head-of-house:      Wife
    Spouse's Name:      Benjamin
    Race:      White
    Occupation:      View Image
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Benjamin Hamilton      52
    Eliza E Hamilton      50
    Eber Hamilton      18
    Agnes Hamilton      15
    Effie Hamilton      10.
  3. [S66] 1860 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Age in 1860:      14
    Birth Year:      abt 1846
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1860:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Gender:      Male
    Post Office:      Lebanon
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Robert B Allen      50
    Angeline Allen      50
    William P Allen      18
    Robert S Allen      16
    Margaret A Allen      15
    Samuel Allen      14
    Miller M Allen      11
    Elza E Allen      10
    Nancy E Allen      8
    Martha E Allen      7
    Isaac J Allen      5
    Charles M Allen      2.
  4. [S69] 1870 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census
    about Samuel Allen
    Name:      Samuel Allen
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1847
    Age in 1870:      23
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Home in 1870:      Center, Boone, Indiana
    Family and neighbors:      View Results
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Male
    Value of real estate:      View Image
    Post Office:      Lebanon.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World Tree.
  6. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about Eliza Hamilton
    Name:      Eliza Hamilton
    Home in 1880:      Sugar Creek, Boone, Indiana
    Age:      28
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1852
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relation to Head of Household:      Wife
    Spouse's Name:      B. F.
    Father's birthplace:      Kentucky
    Mother's birthplace:      Kentucky
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Occupation:      Keeping House
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Female
    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
         
    View Image
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    B. F. Hamilton      30
    Eliza Hamilton      28
    Oliver P. Hamilton      1.
  7. [S55] 1910 census on Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census
    about Eliza E Hamilton
    Name:      Eliza E Hamilton
    Age in 1910:      60
    Estimated Birth Year:      abt 1850
    Birthplace:      Indiana
    Relation to Head of House:      Wife
    Father's Birth Place:      Kentucky
    Mother's Birth Place:      Kentucky
    Spouse's Name:      Benj F
    Home in 1910:      Jefferson, Putnam, Indiana
    Marital Status:      Married
    Race:      White
    Gender:      Female
    Neighbors:      View others on page
    Household Members:      
    Name      Age
    Benj F Hamilton      62
    Eliza E Hamilton      60
    Ester M Hamilton      5.
  8. [S52] 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc 2010, January 1920 Internet Resources Available on line.

Phoebe Irene Cook1

F, b. 19 January 1852, d. 18 April 1913
     Phoebe Irene Cook was also known as Phebe Irene Wolcott.2 She was born on 19 January 1852 at Manti, Sanpete County, Utah.1,2 She married Byron Harvey Allred at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, on 5 October 1867.1,2 As of circa 1869,her married name was Allred.1 Phoebe and Alta was listed as Byron Harvey Allred's wife on the 1880 Census at Enumeration District 39, Garden City Village, Rich County, Utah; 2 2 Allred B H white male 33 married merchant IA TN NY; PI white female 28 wife married keeping house UT CT CT; B H white male 10 son single at school attending school ID IA UT; Myra I white female 8 daughter single attending school ID IA UT; 2 3 Alta M white female 24 wife married keeping house IL IA IL; O A white male 2 son single ID IA IL; MC white male 7/12 Oct son single UT IA IL.3 Phoebe Irene Cook died on 18 April 1913 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, at age 61.1,2

Family

Byron Harvey Allred b. 29 May 1847, d. 6 Aug 1912

Citations

  1. [S738] Allred Family Roster, online http://www.allredroster.com/scripts/foxweb.exe/allred/eni2
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  3. [S56] 1880 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1880 United States Federal Census
    about B. H. Allred
    Name:
    B. H. Allred

    Home in 1880:
    Garden City Village, Rich, Utah

    Age:
    33

    Estimated Birth Year:
    abt 1847

    Birthplace:
    Iowa

    Relation to Head of Household:
    Self (Head)

    Spouse's Name:
    P. I.

    Father's birthplace:
    Tennessee

    Mother's birthplace:
    New York

    Neighbors:
    View others on page

    Occupation:
    Merchant

    Marital Status:
    Married

    Race:
    White

    Gender:
    Male

    Cannot read/write:

    Blind:

    Deaf and dumb:

    Otherwise disabled:

    Idiotic or insane:
    
    View Image

    Household Members:
    Name
    Age


    B. H. Allred
    33


    P. I. Allred
    28


    B. H. Allred
    10


    Myra I. Allred
    8


    Alta M. Allred
    24


    O. A. Allred
    2


    M. C. Allred
    7M.

Mary Eliza Tracy1

F, b. 3 March 1873, d. 30 September 1949
     Davis Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies (1977), pg.6
"Mary Eliza Tracy Allred." Dictated to Emily Black, 1937. Born in Ogden, Utah,
1874. Daughter of Helon Henry Tracy. Father in penitentiary, c. 1885. Eliza R.
Snow and Joseph Smith's watch. Was sickly child due to overwork. Father took other wives to Wyoming to avoid being arrested again. Lived in Star Valley. As plural wife married Byron Harvey Allred, member of bishopric, c. 1892. Settled at Colonia Dublan, Mexico. Barren country. Moses Thatcher begged people to
stay in Mexico. President of YLMIA. Moved to Pacheco, c. 1894. Indian scares.
Moved back to Dublan, then to Colonia Garcia, 1895. Murder of Mrs. McDonald.
("I was so nervous there, I was afraid to be alone. Neither were we doing so
well. We left the mountains.") Settled at Guadalupe, seven miles from Dublan.
Mexican Revolution. Mexican raids. ("A terrible atmosphere—for so long.")
Exodus to El Paso, July 1912. Lived in lumber yard. Husband died week later.
Went to live with relatives in Ogden. Nursing work.2 Mary Eliza Tracy was born on 3 March 1873 at Utah.1 She married Byron Harvey Allred at Utah circa 1894.1 As of circa 1894,her married name was Allred.1 Mary Eliza Tracy died on 30 September 1949 at Weber County, Utah, at age 76.1

Family

Byron Harvey Allred b. 29 May 1847, d. 6 Aug 1912

Citations

  1. [S738] Allred Family Roster, online http://www.allredroster.com/scripts/foxweb.exe/allred/eni2
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree;.

William Moore Allred1

M, b. 24 December 1819, d. 8 June 1901
     Allred Progenitors: (Isaac, William, Thomas) Born: 12/24/1819 Bedford Co., TN Died: 06/08/1901
Submitted by: Delia Thompson 05/25/1999

William Moore Allred - A Biographical Sketch
Submitted by Delia Thompson

A short autobiographical sketch of the life and travels of William Moore Allred, son of Isaac and Mary Calvert Allred--

As I did not keep a diary, I write this from memory, commenced in St Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, June 22nd, 1885, after I was sixty-five years old.

I was born on the 24th of December, 1819, in Bedford County, Tennessee, fifty miles south of the City of Nashville. My parents were very religious. I believe they belonged to the Presbyterian Church. I never had much chance for an education, and it was very old fashioned at that. I remember of going to sabbath school a few times where I was born and a few times to the camp meetings, but yet I was too young to understand much about doctrine. When I was about ten or eleven years old, my parents moved to Missouri, about five hundred miles north, and settled in Monroe County on the state road in 3 miles of one of the three forks of Salt River. We found this to be quite a different country. Where I was born, I do not remember of ever seeing the snow over six inches deep. Perhaps it would go off [the] next day, and then it would be mud. The first year we lived in Missouri, I think the snow fell in November about two feet deep and stayed on the ground all winter. Towards spring there came a thaw, and then froze a crust on the snow so we could walk on it. As there were plenty of deer in that country (it being new country), we could go out and find the deer, and when they would jump they would break through. The dogs could run on top of the snow, so we could catch them. While living at this place, I killed the first deer I ever killed. I was about twelve or thirteen years old. I remember the first winter I frosted my feet some and could not be out much for a long while. My two younger brothers, Reddin A. and Reddick N. (twins), had no shoes, and my oldest brother John E. would bring in wood for us. We would spell and read, and that was the way the twins commenced to learn to read. If I remember right, I was the first school teacher they ever had, and that was the first school I ever taught, and the only one; only two scholars.

I think in the fall of 1831 I first heard of the people called Mormons (Latter Day Saints). Hyrum Smith and John Murdock being the first I heard preach. While living at this place, Father went out one day and killed two deer before breakfast. When he came home, there was a man with his family there just moving into the country by the name of Bell. When he saw the two deer, he said with an oath "Allred and Bell shall never go to hell."

In 1832, George M. Hinkle, Daniel Cathcart, and James Johnson came along and raised up a branch of the [Latter-Day Saint] church called the Salt River Branch. I was baptized in Salt River on the 10th of September 1832. There were 19 baptized that day, including my parents and one or two of my sisters. The gathering place for the Saints was in Jackson County, about two hundred miles west of here.

In 1833, the church was driven from Jackson County. My father had sold his farm to move up there, but when he heard they were driven out, he rented the farm that the man had that bought his. He changed houses and stayed there one year. While living here, I first saw Joseph Smith, the Prophet (in 1834), as he was going up in what was called Zion's Camp. (While living here, my Brother Harvy, when he would laugh his mouth would draw around to one side. Father sent for the Elders and he was healed immediately).

We then moved to Clay County, I think in 1835, where the Saints had settled after being driven from Jackson County. I think we lived there one year, in 1835, and the people became so hostile we had to move to Caldwell, an adjoining county; a still more thinly settled country (1836). Many of them, I presume, were out laws that had fled from other parts. We lived there about two years and was getting a pretty good start; broke ground in Far West for temple in 1837.

My father had quite a large family, in all nine boys and four girls. The oldest girl died before I was born. We suffered considerably from persecution and exposure. Persecution still increased, and finally Governor Boggs ordered out the militia of the state against us. I was in pretty much all the campaigns and troubles. In 1838, I went with a company to assist a settlement that was besieged by the mob in the town of Dewit on the Missouri River in Carroll County. We arrived there in the night, and it was decided to go and attack the mob that night.1 History Detail William Moore ALLRED (01020505) Allred Progenitors: (Isaac, William, Thomas)
Born: 12/24/1819
Died: 06/08/1901
Submitted by: Lloyd Thayne 05/08/2000

BIOGRAPHY AND JOURNAL
of
WILLIAM MOORE ALLRED

(The following was typed by great-granddaughter, Dorthy Thayne Bodily and great-great-granddaughter, Janice Bodily Young, from William Moore Allred’s Journal and Biography with the attempt to correct grammar, capitalization or spelling only where obvious or necessary to retain intent. All information in italics and foot notes are inserted by the typist and are not found in the original journal. Church History and Information notes are taken from "The Restored Church, A Brief History of the Growth and Doctrines of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints” by William E. Berrett. Information about the settlement of Bear Lake is taken from various sources. The page numbers are inserted in parenthesis at the point in which the page break occurs in the original journal, so that reference can be made back to the original manuscript.)


William Moore Allred was the son of Isaac and Mary Calvert Allred. His brothers and Sisters, along with their birth dates and places, marriage dates, spouses and death dates are as follows:

SIBLING Birth Date Birth Place Death Date
Spouse(s)
Elizabeth Martin Allred 6 Jan 1812 Farmington, Marshall, Tennessee 11 Oct 1819
John Calvert Allred 5 Oct 1813 Farmington, Marshall, Tennessee 10 Jan 1893
md Elizabeth Bates
Nancy Weakley Allred 9 Nov 1815 Farmington, Marshall, Tennessee
md Asa C. Earl
Sarah Louisa Allred 14 Nov 1817 Farmington, Marshall, Tennessee 11 Mar 1879
md Allen Taylor
Reddick Newton Allred 21 Feb 1822 Nashville, Bedford, Tennessee 10 Oct 1905
md Lucy Hoyt
Reddin A. Allred 21 Feb 1822 Nashville, Bedford, Tennessee 3 Aug 1889
md Julia Ann Bates
Mary Caroline Allred 9 Dec 1824 Nashville, Bedford, Tennessee 24 Apr 1880
md Joseph Egbert
James Riley Allred 28 Jan 1827 Nashville, Bedford, Tennessee 14 Apr 1871
Paulinus Harvey Allred 21 Jan 1829 Farmington, Marshall, Tennessee 29 Nov 1890
md (1) Malissa Isabel Norton, (2) Frances E. Kell
Joseph Anderson Allred 26 Apr 1831 Salt River, Monroe, Missouri 30 Sep 1891
md (1) Rhoda Ann Palmer, (2) Naomi Brandham, (3) Georganna Lambert
Isaac Morley Allred 22 Jan 1835 Salt River, Monroe, Missouri 27 May 1916
md (1) Charlet Henderson, (2) Angeline Watson Cole
Sidney Rigdon Allred 22 Oct 1837 Caldwell County, Missouri 22 Nov 1911
md (1) Lucy Ann Allred, (2) Matilda Robinson


William Moore Allred's children with his first wife, Orissa Angelia Bates, along with their birth dates and places, marriage dates, spouses and death dates are as follows:

CHILD Birth Date Birth Place Death Date
Spouse(s)
William Lansing Allred 18 Oct 1842 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 28 Jan 1915
md Sarah Ann Wilkes
Mary Adaline Allred 20 Dec 1844 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois 23 Feb 1914
md Mosiah Works Booth
Byron Harvey Allred 29 May 1847 Kanesville, Pottowattamie, Iowa 6 Aug 1912
md (1) Phoebe Irene Cook, (2) Alta Matilda Rolph, (3) Mary Tracy
Marvin Adelbert Allred 13 Aug 1849 Kanesville, Pottowattamie, Iowa 30 Apr 1916
md (1) Amanda Jane Bird, (2) Caroline Jensen
Amelia Lorianda Allred 30 Jul 1851 Loop Fork, Howard, Nebraska (Stillborn)
Melvin Helbert Allred 19 Oct 1852 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 16 Dec 1854
Medwin Newton Allred 20 Feb 1855 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 29 Jul 1895
md Maria Josphene Stock
Orissa Angelia Allred 16 Jun 1857 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 14 May 1922
md Christian William Wilhelmson
Lydia Lavette Allred 23 Sep 1859 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 24 Apr 1917
md Christopher Amos Merkley
Seymour LeGrand Allred 15 Apr 1862 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 20 Apr 1923
md Claudia Ellen Stock
Nelson Calvert Allred 5 Oct 1865 St. Charles, Bear Lake, Idaho 2 Mar 1929
md Sarah Marinda Nelson
Orson Pratt Allred 29 Nov 1867 St. Charles, Bear Lake, Idaho 19 Mar 1910
md Sarah Jane Rich

His children with his second wife, Martha Jane Martindale, along with their birth dates, and places, marriage dates spouses and death dates are as follows:

Edgar Martindale Allred 27 Feb 1858 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah 5 Dec 1925
md Nancy Henrietta Hunt
Martha Jane Allred Nov 1860 Grantsville, Tooele, Utah Nov 1860

JOURNAL
(1)
1885
A Biography sketch of the life and written by William Moore Allred, son of Isaac and Mary Calvert Allred. As I did not keep a diary I write this from memory. Commenced in St. Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho, June 22, 1885, after I was 65 years old.

1819
I was born on the 24th of December 1819 in Bedford County, fifty miles south of the City of Nashville, (Tennessee). My parents were very religious. I believe they belonged to the Presbyterian Church. I never had much chance for an education, and it was very old fashioned (education) at that. I remember of going to Sabbath School a few times where I was born and went a few times to the camp meetings, but yet I was too young to understand much about doctrine.

When I was about ten or eleven years old my parents moved to Missouri, about five hundred miles north, and settled in Monroe County, on the state road, (with)in three miles of one of the three forks of Salt River. We found that to be quite a different (from the) country where I was born, I do not remember seeing snow over six inches deep, and perhaps it would be off next day, and then it would be mud. But the first winter we lived in Missouri, the snow fell in November about two feet deep and that stayed on the ground all winter. Towards spring there came a thaw and then froze a crust on this snow so we could walk on it and as there was plenty of deer in that country. It being a new county we could go out and find the deer and when they would jump they would break though and the dogs could run on top the snow, so we could catch them while staying at this place. I killed the first deer I ever killed. I was about twelve or thirteen years old.

(2)
I remember the first winter I frosted my feet and could not be out much for a long while, and my two younger brothers, Reddin A. and Reddick N. (twins), had no shoes, and my oldest brother, John, would bring in wood for us, and we would spell and read, and that was the way the twins commenced to learn to read, if I remember right I was the first school teacher they ever had, and that was the first school I ever taught and the only one, (only two brothers).

1831
I think in the fall of 1831, I first heard of the people called Mormons (or Latter-Day Saints). Hyrum Smith and John Murdock, being the first I heard preach.
While living at this place, Father went out one day and killed two deer before breakfast and when he came home there was a man with his family there just moving into the country by the name of Bell, when he saw the two deer he said with an oath "Allred and Bell will never go to Hell."

1832
In 1832 George M. Hinkle, Daniel Cathcart, and James Johnson came along, and raised up a branch of the church called the Salt River Branch. I was baptized in Salt River on the 10 of Sept. 1832, there were 19 baptized that day including my parents and one or two of my sisters. The gathering place for the Saints was in Jackson County, about two hundred miles west of here.

1833
In 1833 the church was driven from Jackson County. My Father had sold his farm to move up there, but when he heard they were driven out he rented a farm from the man that had bought his, he changed houses and stayed there one year.

1834
While living here I first saw Joseph Smith, the prophet, (in 1834) as he was going up to what was called Zion’s Camp. While living here my brother, Harvey, sent for the Elders, (because when he would laugh his mouth would draw around to one side) and he was healed immediately.

1835
We then moved to Clay County (I think it was 1835), where the (3) Saints had settled after being driven from Jackson County. I think we lived there one year, and in 1835 the people became so hostile we had to move to Caldwell, an adjoining County. A still more thinly settled Country. Many of them, I presume, were outlaws that had fled from other parts.

1836
We lived there about 2 years and was getting a pretty good start. Broke ground in Far West for a Temple in 1837. My father had quite a large family, in all nine boys and four girls, the oldest girl died before I was born, and we suffered considerable from persecution, and exposure, persecution still increased, and finally Governor Boggs ordered out the militia of the state against us. I was in pretty much all the campaign troubles in 1835. I went with a company to assist a settlement that was besieged by the mob, in the Town of DeWitt, on the Missouri River in Carroll County. We arrived there in the night, and it was decided to go and attack the mob that night. They were camped only a little way from the town, but when we came to their picket guard, he fired on us and that raised the camp. They commenced shooting towards us, but the bullets went over our heads, but I could hear the bullets striking the limbs of the trees over our heads (it being a timbered country). But there were none of us hit. George M. Hinkle was our commander (the man that Baptized me). He said he found there was a gully between us and their camp and only a narrow bridge to cross, so he ordered us to retreat, which we did in good order. Finally we made a treaty with them, and agreed to leave the place.

Next day after we started a “Brother” died, and we split out what we called Pruncheons out of a big tree, and laid one in the bottom of the grave, one each side and one on top which made (4) a rude coffin, rolled him in some sheets or something of this kind, and laid him in his last resting place.

1838
I then went to Paris County to assist them there, when I awoke in the morning, as I lay out on the ground there was about 6 inches of snow on me. While at this place I saw the Altar that Joseph (Smith) said was where Adam offered sacrifices. The saints had to gather into Far West (the county seat or headquarters) and then the whole army came against us. I was out with a company of about 50 as a scouting party or picket guard under this same Col. Hinkle. The army came on another road, and got near the city almost between us and the city. We had to come around, and come in on another road. As we came in, we came in single file. Just as the army was marching up to our rude breast works of old wagons, house logs, and anything we could get. Some of the army said when they saw us (50 men) come in they thought there was a thousand of us. When we came in we tied our horses, I laid my hat down by my horse, and tied a handkerchief on my head, and went down to the breastworks. Just at that time, Captain Killion came along and said, "Boy, the watch word is ‘God and Liberty’.” The troops came marching up slowly to within about gun shot, then wheeled about, and marched back to the creek about a mile from town. When they were marching up so close to us, I thought every minute, the word would be to fire. I think the next day I was on guard right on the road when Apostle C. C. Rich (Charles C.) and others went out to meet the officers of the army. Bro. Rich carrying a white flag. I stood in plain view and watched (5) them until they met the officers and talked a few moments. When Bro. Rich started back, and got three or four rods away, Bogart shot at him. Then this same Col. Hinkle made a treaty with the mob (as we called them) and agreed to deliver up Joseph, and Hyrum (Smith), and some others, and to deliver up our armies and leave the State on the seventh of September.

Church history note: "Colonel George M. Hinkle, as the highest militia officer in Caldwell Country, was in command of the defending forces. On the 31st day of October he received an interview with General Lucas, in command of the general forces of state militia, seeking a compromise. General Lucas proposed the following terms to the Saints:
1. "To give up their leaders to be tried and punished.

2. "To make a appropriation of their property, all who had taken up arms, to the payment of their debts, and indemnity for damage done be them.

3. "That the balance should leave the state, and be protested out be the militia, but to be permitted to remain under protection until further orders were received from the commander-in-chief.

4. "To give up arms of every description to be receipted for."
For some unknown reason Colonel Hinkle agreed to those absurd terms. Hinkle returned to Far West and reported to Joseph Smith that General Lucas desired a conference with him, together with Sidney Rigdon and others they consented to the interview. But on reaching the camp of Lucas, Hinkle said " General, these are the prisoners I agreed to deliver up." That night they lay in chains subject to a cold drenching rain and the abuse of the guards. On the following morning the militia marched out of Far West with Colonel Hinkle and their arms delivered to General Lucas. The Mobs the ransacked the city, destroying property, beating defenseless men and ravishing their women. On the night of November 1st a court-martial was held and the prisoners were to be shot at sunrise.

Previous to this Joseph (Smith) was put on trial in Davis Co. (Daviess County) and we heard that a mob was collecting to take him, so a company of us went out to lay in ambush near the court, in case we were needed. I lived eight miles from Far West, but I was in town when the company was made up, so I volunteered to go. As I passed a door I asked a lady if she would give me a piece of bread to take with me, and she gave me a small piece. When we got out there we found there were a great many in the same fix, or worse, than I was and the commander sent a sack around and got all there was in camp, and then we all fared alike and had enough. We lay in ambush till night, and Joseph (Smith) was discharged and we returned home.

I never shall forget the night that Joseph and Hyrum (Smith) went into the camp of the mob. Such yelling and screaming and swearing I never heard, we could hear them up to town. They held a court Martial, and condemned Joseph and Hyrum to death. But General Doniphan, a noble gentleman, interfered and opposed it. He said he would march his brigade away. “I'll have no hand in such Cold Blooded Murder,” as he called it.

Church History note: General Doniphan to whom General Lucas sent the execution order made a curt refusal:
"It is cold-blooded murder. I will not obey your order. My brigade shall march for Liberty tomorrow morning at 8:00 O'clock; and if you execute these men, I will hold you responsible before an earthly tribunal, so help me God." - A. Doniphan, Brigadier General.
Upon receiving that message, General Lucas was afraid to carry out the order and the matter was dropped.

Then on the 1st of Nov., the troops marched up in to the edge of town, formed a hollow square, I should think about ten or fifteen deep of the footmen, and then the horsemen on the outside. (6) Then opened a place for us to march in, then close up the place and ordered us to march to the center of the square and lay down our arms. I remember Captain McKay (now a bishop in Salt Lake City). He felt so indignant and spunky about it, when he marched up to the place, he brought his sword over handed and sent it into the ground as far as he could send it. And in fact it was a great trial for all of us. We then were marched to the public square, and compelled to sign away our property to pay the expenses of the war. Then permitted to return to our farms, after about 80 others had been taken prisoners with the understanding that we were to leave the state in the spring. But before we were discharged General Lucas (or General Clark) advised us to go to our farms, and not gather together and not organize with Bishops and Presidents any more but live in a scattered condition like other people. If we would do so we might stay, otherwise we must go, and as for our leaders, we need not think for a moment, that they would be released, for said he, "Their die is cast their Doom is Sealed."

Then the people went home to their farms to find their crops destroyed; their animals stolen or shot down, and left lying on the ground; feather beds torn to pieces; and other household goods destroyed. When we got home (I think my Father had only one, or perhaps two teams, most of us had to walk through the snow), my older sister’s clothes were wet and frozen up to her knees. It was a trying time. But before the troubles commenced so hard, my oldest brother, John, had gone to visit his wife's people living on the Mississippi opposite Quincy City in Illinois, as the mob were still hunting for those that had taken an active part in the campaign. It was thought best for me to leave for awhile. (7) I went down to where my bother was and stayed a month or two until the excitement died away a little. I then returned home. Then went with my two younger brothers and some others to chop a cord wood on the Missouri River opposite Jackson County. It was very cold weather, we camped out in the woods and suffered considerable.

1839
So in the Spring of 1839, we left Missouri and rented a farm in Adams County, Illinois, below Quincy, a few miles. While living here I had a long spell of sickness. Came near dying. Probably brought on by exposure in Missouri. After I got up so I could be around, it was more than a year before I could do a good days work. I was in the habit of talking in my sleep, and some time would get up out of my bed. While I was sick or at least when I got a little better, my two younger brothers were sleeping overhead which we had loose boards for a floor, I got up one night in my sleep, and moved the boards over my bed, and climbed up and got into bed with them before I awoke.

1840
I think we lived here near two years, then my Father moved to the city of Nauvoo, Hancock Co. Ill., where the Saints had commenced to gather. It proved to be a sickly place and I had a great deal of sickness, or fever and ague, a thing I was not a stranger to, for I had the ague in me.

1841
In 1841 the Temple in Nauvoo was commenced. Same year the Nauvoo Legion was organized, and I had a commission from Gov. Carlin as Captain of the 2nd Co. 2nd Battalion, 2nd Regiment, 2nd Cohort of the Nauvoo Legion. We drew U.S. Rifles, but when the Nauvoo City Charter was taken from us, we had to give up the arms.
I started with the first load of stone that was hauled for (8) the Temple but as I had a oxen team, Lorenzo Brown got to the temple first, as he had a horse team. I worked a few days on the horn work, I thought I would learn that trade, but after that I commenced work at carpenter and joiner work to learn the trade under a builder by the name of Reuben Hadlock. But he soon broke down, and then I kept on working with good workmen that I had got acquainted with, and had worked with, and they were very kind in showing me how to work. I worked more or less on the Temple until it was nearly done.
There was a saloon put up right by the Temple, and the City Council declared it a nuisance. I was ordered out with my company (with others) as a guard, while the order was executed. They took a team, and dragged it away to a steep gully and tipped it over down the hill, bottles and all. I was also present when the Nauvoo Expositor was destroyed.

(Information Note Church History) To protect his people the Prophet called out the entire force of the Nauvoo Legion and proclaimed martial law in Nauvoo, June 18. In a last address to his soldiers and people he said: "I call God and Angles to witness that I have unsheathed my sword with a firm and unalterable determination, that this people shall have their legal rights and be protected from mob violence, or my blood shall be spilt upon the ground like water, and my body be consigned to the silent tomb. While I live I will never tamely submit to the dominion of cursed mobocracy."

I was present when Joseph (Smith) preached the first sermon on baptism for the dead. I was also present when the first person was baptized in the Mississippi River for the dead, before the baptismal font was finished in the Temple.

1841
In the spring or summer of 1841 I first became acquainted with Orissa Angelia Bates. I was introduced to her at a singing practice, by a friend of mine, and of hers, (Stephen Goddard). It seemed almost providential, for I had seen her, and inquired of someone who she was, and she had seen me, and inquired who I was. So at this singing practice, I told this friend I would like to have an introduction. He asked her if she was willing to have an introduction to a friend of his (giving her my name) she said she was, so I waited on her home that night. She was living with her sister, Elder Orson Pratt's wife.

1842
So I continued to visit upon her until the ninth day of (9) January 1842, when we were married by Doctor John C. Bennett in the house of the apostle, Orson Pratt. The Prophet Joseph (Smith) and his wife were present.
We lived at my Father's house for a while, and then we lived in the house with Orson Pratt. And while living there our first son, William Lansing (Allred), was born on the 18th day October 1842, when I was so very sick I couldn't get up. The child came near dying. They said he would lay for 15 minutes like he was dead. My wife wasn't very smart and not realizing the consequences she done her washing when the child was one week old, she took cold, and it settled in her breast. Father came and wanted us to go to his house to live, so we went, and she had that worse broken breast I ever saw. I have heard Father tell people about it, and he said it was as big as an iron teakettle, and nearly as black. Oh! it run terrible.
We lived there until I built a small brick house not far from the Temple. I paid $150.00 for a small lot, and built a small brick house on it, and then only got $35.00 for it when we had to leave Nauvoo. We had a very hard time to get along with so much mobbing and persecution, as to the persecution of the Church, "see Church History." I remember once I had bought some Kentucky Jeans to make a coat, and I had to sell it to get some bread.
After the temple was finished sufficiently to give endowments, and before we left Nauvoo, we got our endowments. We was sealed over the alter by H. C. Kimball, but not till after we had two children.

1843
Nothing particular transpired in 1843 that I remember of just now so far as I was concerned, only hard work and hard living and persecution. I was present one time when Joseph (Smith) was preaching, and he said if he should tell all the Lord had revealed to him, some would seek his life, says he, even as good a man as old as Father Cole here (Pointing down to him on (10) the stands) but there were but few I suppose that knew what he meant. I have played ball with him many times, but it was quite a stumbling block to some, after some had found fault about it. He was preaching one day, and he told a story about a certain prophet that was setting under the shade of a tree, amusing himself in some way, and a hunter came along and reproved him, and he asked the hunter if he always kept his bow strung up: “Oh, no,” said he. “Why not?” “Because it would loose its elasticity.” “Well then,” said the Prophet, “it is just so with my mind. I do not want it strung up all the time.” Well, I might keep on quoting his sayings that would be interesting, and many prophecies that I have heard him deliver, and have seen many fulfilled (see top of these 2 pages).

Information written on the top of page 10 and 11 of William Moore Allred’s History is inserted here.
I was present in the Nauvoo Legion when it was called up in front of the Mansion, where the Prophet made his last speech, as he stood on the little frame opposite the Mansion on the 18th of June 1843. He called on the Legion to stand by him and drawing his sword and presenting it to Hyrum (Smith) said, “I call God and angels to witness that I have unsheathed my sword, that this people shall be free or my blood shall be spilt upon the ground like water.”
I was present in a crowd when Joseph (Smith) started to Carthage to give himself up, he said "Boys, if I do not come back take care of yourselves for I go as a Lamb to the slaughter." Those were the last words I heard him speak, and the last time I saw him alive.

1844
On the 27th of June 1844, Joseph and Hyrum (Smith) were killed in Carthage jail by a mob with blackened faces. On the 28th, the bodies were brought to Nauvoo. And on the 29th they were viewed by ten thousand people. Quite a number were so enraged at the mob that they wanted to go out and slay them, but Dr. Richards said, "Brethren Think, Think, and Think again before you act." Sidney Rigdon, one of Joseph's Counselors, had moved to Pittsburgh, and when he heard of Joseph's death he came to (11) Nauvoo claiming his right to lead the church, at least he said the church was 14 years old and had the right to choose a guardian, but Brigham Young, the President of the twelve apostles, and others of the twelve (that had been on Missions) just got home as the meeting (which) was called for Rigdon to preach, and after he got through Brigham got up and spoke with such power that it convinced nearly all that were present, that the Mantle of Joseph had fallen on him. I was perfectly satisfied.
On the 20th of December 1844, our oldest daughter was born, (Mary Adaline [Allred]). When Adaline was from six to ten months old she had such long black hair her Mother kept a net on her head. Then her hair would curl up at the edge of the net. I have heard people speak of it as they would pass the house as we lived on Main street only 2 or 3 blocks east of the Temple, and when she was ten months old, the Mother took cold and the same breast that had broken the other time, gathered and broke again.

1845
At the spring Conference I think it was, that quite a number of Seventies were called. At least men were called to be ordained Seventies. I should think perhaps one hundred. And I was among them. I was ordained May 20th 1845 under the hands of Levi W. Hancock.

1846
Then persecution increased and in the spring of 1846 we had to leave Nauvoo. However, Pres. Young and others started in February, and crossed the Mississippi on the ice. We had very hard times. I had no wagon or team so we started with Father, but when we overtook Orson Pratt, we went with him to Winter (12) Quarters on the west side of the Missouri River. But just before we crossed the river, the Government sent for five hundred of our most able bodied men we had in camp, to go and help to fight the battles of Mexico and two of my brothers went, Reddick N. and James R. They had a very hard time of it. This was called the Mormon Battalion. At that place was the first time I saw Col. Thomas L. Kane. He had come as a Mediator between us and the Government. He was a vary small man but he was a noble man with a big heart. We stayed in Winter Quarters one winter, then we moved back to the east side of the river to where my Father lived.

1847
On the 29th of May 1847, our second son, Byron Harvey (Allred), was born. I had to go off to Missouri to work, and one time when I started, Byron was such a sickly, puny little thing. But when I came back he was so large and fat I did not know him and it was a long time before he looked natural.

In 1847 the pioneers went to Salt Lake Valley. And back on Dec. 19th my brother, Reddick, got back from the Battalion. He had a very hard time of it. He had to eat raw-hide, and mule meat and mules brains.

1848
In this year, my Father and the most of his family got ready. And in the spring of 1849 they all crossed the plains, all but Reddin and I. Father sold his place to me.

1849
While I lived at this place, Oliver Cowdery came back to the church, and I was present when he spoke in the conference, but he went back to Missouri and died before he had the opportunity (13) to come to Salt Lake.

1850
I think it was in this year that Orson Pratt came from England on a visit, as part of his family were here and part in England (as he was there on a Mission). He was there at the April Conference, and it was so very dry, the people began to have great fears about their crops. When he was called upon to open the Conference with prayer, he prayed for rain. As it was as clear as it could be, not a cloud to be seen, and just as the Conference was dismissed, it commenced to sprinkle rain (the meeting was in a grove) and he and I started to walk to my house (8 miles), and when we got home we were as wet as though we had been in a river. I am a little ahead of my story.
Marvin Adelbert (Allred) was born at this place on the 13th of August 1849.
While living at this place I worked with Samuel Wood at wagon work. And after I left the shop, I made the first wagon I ever owned from bottom to top (excepting the iron work) and painted it. I made my yoke and bows. I raised a yoke of steers, and broke them to be quite handy. Then I got a yoke of oxen off Orson Pratt. And then I had two cows I yoked up, and that completed my team.
While living here, on the 20th of December 1850, the day Adaline was 6 years old, she finished piecing and joining a quilt, and going to school at the same time. It was too much for her eyes and a film commenced to grow over her eyes and we had to keep her in a darkened room. And I got two or three of the best doctors I could get, but nothing seemed to do much good. When we crossed the plains, I lined my wagon cover with green calico to make (14) it as dark as possible. In the spring of 1851 we started out and we crossed the plains arriving in Salt Lake City on the 7th day of October, after a toilsome journey.

1851
On the 30th of July, my wife had a little girl, stillborn, on the loop fork (second Daughter). Elder Pratt told us to name her, so we called her Amelia Lorianda (Allred). My wife was quite poorly the rest of the way.
I had a very hard time on the road although I had a gentle team, and I did not have to work ten minutes on my wagon all the way. I did not even break a bow key, but someone that unyoked my cattle lost one, but I had some extra ones in a little side box so that did not hinder. Many times I would have to drop my whip when we drove into camp, and go to work on a wagon or something else, and let someone else unyoke my team. I had charge of all of Elder Pratt’s teams and they were mostly wild cattle that never was yoked till he started. He had only enough of broken cattle for leaders, and the teamsters were about as bad. When I would get across a bad place, I would give my whip to Lansing, (he was not quite nine years old) and he would drive my team, and I would help all the others across and then run till I overtook my team again.
When we got into the city (Salt Lake City), I heard Bro. J. W. Cummins (captain of a hundred) tell Bro. J. W. Wells that he would not go through what I did crossing the plains for five hundred dollars.

For fear some might think that Elder Pratt put too much on me, I will say he has always done well by me.
Soon after we passed Fort Bridge we met Bro. Coaley, who informed me of the death of my mother. Which was quite a heavy blow to me, for I was looking forward to the time, and only a few (15) days at that, till I would see my parents and brothers and sisters and friends that had gone ahead.
Soon after I arrived in the city we went to where my Father lived on Big Cottonwood Creek, about eight miles south of the city. Stayed there a few days, and then rented a house in the city belonging to my brother, Warren. Lived there the first winter, then I rented a house of Ephraim Green near the Temple Block.
Worked at carpenter work part of the time on the public works.
Soon after I arrived in the city I was elected captain of a company, that my brother, Reddick, had. But he had either been promoted to a higher office or had left the city so the place was vacant.
When I came to meet with my quorum in the city. I was set apart as one of the Council of the 7th quorum.
I brought a small lot of Bro. Green, and built a good little adobe house on it, still having charge of Orson Pratt's affairs, as he had to go to the city of Washington on a Mission.

1852
On the 19th of Oct. 1852, Melvin Helbert (Allred) was born, and died Dec 16th, 1854. He was a bright boy (turn to

1854).
When we got to the city, Adaline’s eyes were very bad. I tried one or two doctors again but to no effect. Of course I had called in the Elders, but did not seem to do much. So one day I met Elder (Orson) Pratt, and asked him what more I could do. He thought for a moment, and then said for me to give him her name in full, and he would take it to the Prayer Circle where the Twelve Apostles and Presidency met, and for me to take her to Uncle John Smith, the Patriarch, Joseph's uncle, and have him administer to her, as he lived on the same block. I took her and told him what I wanted, he told his wife to anointed her eyes, which she did and then he laid his hands on her head, and prayed for, and blessed her, and when we started home, I was (16) leading her by the hand, and she looked up in my face and said, "Father, my eyes are nearly well.” and I now bear my testimony that her eyes were well in a few days (and we did not have to keep her in a dark room anymore). Soon after this, on her birthday Dec. 20, 1852, I cut a hole in the ice in City Creek, when it was 8 or 10 inches thick, and baptized her.
(One or two incidents I forgot to mention as we crossed the plains.)

I had a door in the side of my wagon, and Byron was about 4 years old, he fell out of the wagon at this side door, right in front of the hind wheels, but he landed on his feet, and sprang forward just in time to save himself as the wagon was going slow in the sand.

Another thing: I used to be in the habit of talking in my sleep, some times when I was very tired. One night while crossing the plains, I was very tired, and almost worn out, I thought I was getting into a very bad place with a team and I begun to bellow, making a terrible ado, and called for help. I raised up in the bed, and got hold of my wife, thinking it was an ox I was holding, and she could not get up, she tried to wake me, and it frightened the children and we all made such a noise the men on guard came running to what was up, she told them I was having a tantrum as we call it, and she said if I did not do better she would have me staked out with the cattle, but I was not quite so bad after that, but if I did commence she would always raise up in the bed so I could not get the start of her.

1853
In this year Orson Pratt published a paper in the city of Washington, or rather a pamphlet called the “Seer,” and sent it to me to sell.
Feb 14th of this year, I was present at the time the ground was broken for the foundation of the temple. The Temple Block was also dedicated at the same time.
On the 6th of April, same year, the corner stones of the (17) Temple were laid.

Information note, Church History: At the General Conference, October 1853, a number of men were called to gather families and strengthen the various settlements. Of those, Lyman Stevens and Reuben W. Allred took fifty families to each of the settlements in San Pete county. (This was William Moore Allred’s brother.)

1854
On the 16th of December, Melvin Hilbert (Allred) died, a little over two years old, he was a very intelligent child, he had the Mountain fever it ran very high indeed, it settled on his liver, and caused an abscess between two of his ribs, and ran so it wore him out.

1855
On the 20th of Feb, Medwin Newton (Allred) was born, and in the spring of this year I moved to Tooele Valley, and stopped awhile at *Benson and Rowberry's sawmill. Then I built a small adobe house, at what was called Bates’ Ranch (my brother-in-law’s). We stayed there one year and while we lived at this place, the grasshoppers ate the crops, and we suffered for bread, but we had plenty of milk so we lived through it by eating greens, and rabbits, and Dutch cheese (cottage cheese), and drinking milk. I bought a few pounds of graham flour, and had to pay ten cents per pound. About this time I commenced keeping a diary, which would have been a great help to me in making out this journal. but the book got misplaced some way, and then I ceased to keep one.

*In 1850 LDS Church Apostle, Ezra Taft Benson was authorized by President Brigham Young to develop a mill site at Twin Springs Creed to serve Mormon Communities in Tooele County. In 1851 a sawmill commenced operating and in 1854 the Lee Brothers, skilled pioneer artisans, were hired to build the mill. The mills large mortised timbers were hauled by team and wagon from the nearby Oquirrh Mountains. In 1855 the mill site community became known as “Richville” and served as the county seat until 1861, when Tooele City was designated.

In 1860 the “E. T. Benson Flour Mill” had one male employee and one run of millstones which produced 1,200 barrels of flour, 7,200 pounds of bran and 5,600 pounds of corn meal, together valued at $17,000. In the same year, Brigham Young acquired the mill, when E. T. Benson moved to Cache Valley.
By 1862, the Mill was referred to as “Young and Rowberry’s.”
Bishop John Rowberry being an early resident of the milltown
(Richville) area. The mill that year reportedly processed 200 bushels of wheat per day under t 250 horsepower capacity.

In 1922, J. Reuben Clark, Jr. (A United States Ambassador to Mexico and later an apostle in the Mormon Church) purchased the Mill. Earlier its original wooden waterwheel and millstones had been replaced by a metal turbine and imported free-standing “grain breakers.” After finally ceasing flour-milling operations in 1938, the mill was used several years for grinding animal feed.
A volunteer committee was organized in 1983 to acquire and restore the historic mill, which was donated by Terracor Corp. to Tooele County.
The mill site was listed on the National Register in 1972.
— The history of the mill was taken from the book “History of Tooele County.”

The following was taken from the journal of Byron Harvey Allred where he tells of his father living at Benson’s Mill:
“I moved to Salt Lake City, Utah with my father’s family in the year 1851 in the fifth year of my age. My father lived at this place until the spring of 1855 when he moved to a place known as Benson’s Mill in Tooele Co, Utah. In the summer of 1856 to a place three miles from there then known as Bates’ Ranch where he lived until the summer of 1858 when he moved to Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah.”

1856
In the fall of 1856 I moved to Grantsville on the west side of Tooele Valley. I sold my house, and lot in Salt Lake City and bought a lot, and some land in Grantsville soon after I went there. I was chosen second Councilor to Bishop Thomas H. Clark and about that time what was called "The Great Reformation" commenced. I and Brother Whittle (the first Councilor) re-baptized pretty much all of the members of that ward. This same fall or first part of winter (about this time I worked [at] (18) Benson's Mill).

1857
I married Martha Jane Martindale for a second wife in Jan or Feb 1857 (6th Feb. I think). We lived in what was called the Old Fort this winter. Was called to lead the singing in Grantsville.

This spring I build a log house on my lot and moved out of the Fort. On the 16th of June 1857, Orissa Angelia (Allred) was born, our third Daughter. In this year the Government sent troops to Utah, against us, under command of Col. Johnson, and there was a call for 30 men from our place to go out to Echo Canyon to hinder the troops from coming in, and I volunteered to go, and on the 10th of Sept., we started and went out to Echo. I was Sergeant of the guard part of the time, while we were there. A young man by the name of Drake was tried by a court martial and was condemned to death for bestiality, but I think he was not executed. We stayed till the first of December, and started home, as the army had went into winter quarters on Ham's Fork, and did not come in that winter.
I got home on the 4th of December, and found all well, although I was not very well myself. I had good health while I was camped out in the snow but when we got to the city we all slept in the Council House and I took about as bad a cold as I ever had. We were discharged (but were) to be ready at an hour’s notice.

1858
On the 27th of Feb 1858, my second wife had a son, we called his name Edgar Martindale (Allred). In the spring of 1858 we left our homes and went as far south as Spring Lake Valley with (19) the intention of setting fire to our dwellings and leaving the country desolated, that is if our enemies should attempt to take possession of the country. But finally there was a treaty or a pardon from the Government, and the troops came in, and settled at Camp Floyd, and we then returned to our homes. This same Col. Kane came again as a Mediator for our people. He was a Noble man. The next winter we hauled hay to Camp Floyd, and got a good price for it, and some of their mules were brought to Grantsville to feed and we had the chance of selling our straw for a pretty good price, so in the sense it was a great help to us. While those mules were being fed on J. H. Coolley's farm we could hear them chewing about a quarter of a mile (away), there being so many together.

1859
On the 23rd of Sept 1859, my first wife had her fourth daughter Lydia Lavette (Allred).
And on the 31st of Dec 1859, our first Daughter Mary Adaline was married to Mosiah Booth.

1860
In the fall, I think in November 1860, my second wife (Martha Jane Martindale) had a daughter, named her Martha Jane (also), but she only lived 3 or 4 hours, and then in a few days the mother died also, (I have lost the exact date) leaving Edgar not quite three years old. She (Martha) told my first wife, Orissa, to take him and raise him as one of her own, and I think she came very near it, for many people thought he was her own child.

1861
On the 18th of Feb 1861, our oldest daughter, Adaline, had her first son, and our first grandson. They called him Mosiah Herman (Booth).

1862
On the 15th of April 1862, Seymour LeGrand (Allred), our 6th son was born.

1863
In 1863, I worked on Molasses Mill for A. C. Brower and A. L. Hales as I did not have much farming land in (20) Grantsville. Before we left Grantsville Lancing went to help immigrants, he also went back on the road with Mr. Lemon. Had a hard time.

1864
I sold out and moved to Bear Lake arriving in St Charles, Rich Co., Utah, on the 26th of May 1864. We were then in Utah, but when they run another line it brought us in Idaho and the county was then called Bear Lake Co. I think I built about the first house in St. Charles. Apostle Charles C. Rich was sent to preside, and settled the valley the year before I came. It is rather a cold country with deep snow, yet I think it is a healthy country. I think we have the best water I ever drank. We suffered some for bread. We had to go to Cache Valley for wheat and flour until we could raise it, and then the frost hurt it sometimes. We had plenty of fish, generally in the spring of the year for a few years, and then we could not get many.

BEAR LAKE VALLEY - This valley is located at an elevation of 6,000 feet and the climate is cold. Spring comes late to this valley, and autumn sometime doesn’t exist. Summers are short and the long winters are not only harsh but often almost unlivable. Why Brigham Young chose a spot like this for some of his people to settle, seems to be almost beyond reason; however, the pioneers that listened to their prophet were rewarded in many ways. Their families grew closer together through the hardest of times and they were loyal not only to their own, but also to anybody else that they knew. They were honest and trustworthy. They were charitable to their neighbors, friends, and relatives. Since this country was so harsh, each had to depend upon everyone else in order to survive, and they could not have accomplished the things they did without depending upon each other and their God.
In 1862, the Homestead Act was passed by congress. Brigham Young knew this would be an opportunity to colonize new places. By living on a tract of land and “proving up” on it, the saints could get a quarter section of land (160 acres). “Proving Up” meant to live on this land, make certain improvements every year and spend a specific number of years on that land before they could receive a title and therefore be able to sell any or all of it. If they did not do all that their contract specified, the land would not be deeded to them. These settlers could usually make a living without too much of an initial investment.
Many of these saints had given away; sold for almost nothing; or had stolen from them; property which they had owned in the states of Missouri, Illinois and Ohio. Their crops and cattle had been destroyed and at times even their loved ones were murdered as they were driven from those places. By getting this land was, at least in a small way, retribution for their previous losses.
Although this valley was harsh, it was also beautiful. And Bear Lake was one of the most appealing aspects. The lake was full of fish and the valley was full of game and Indians. Indians? Yes! The Indians used this valley as a rendezvous with other tribes for trading their robes, furs and horses. They used it to dress their buffalo hides, dance, play, and gamble. These were important rendezvous for the Indians. The Shoshones and the Bannocks claimed Bear Lake Valley as their own.
Brigham Young had always had fair dealings with Washakie, the Chief of the Shoshones, and when he sent Charles C. Rich into this valley, it was with the understanding that this practice would continue. President Rich negotiated with Chief Washakie, and it was determined that the settlers would reserve the lower area around the lake for the exclusive use of the Indians.

President Rich also promised the Chief, that when the farmers began raising crops, they would share with the Indians. He asked the chief if he could keep his tribe from stealing animals from the white man and molesting them. As he put it, “Control your Indians.” The Chief replied, “They are like white man, some bad, some good. If they steal your stock from you and if I find out about it, I will sent them back.”

President Rich reported to Brigham Young that he thought the Bear Lake Valley would indeed be a good place to settle. If he had been negotiating in this valley in January, he may have told President Young an entirely different story.

The land was not surveyed for almost ten years after the saints had settled in that valley (1871-1872). What they thought was part of Utah Territory was, in fact, Idaho. But things moved quite fast after President Rich reported to President Young.

Brigham Young knew and trusted Charles C. Rich and he needed a man who could handle difficult situations. For President Rich and all that went with him, it was a test of faith. They moved their families into yet another new frontier. But most never faltered, because if it was a call from Brigham Young, it was a call from the Lord.
President Rich had blazed trails before in Mississippi and Missouri. This new frontier required these same skills and he took a skeleton crew ahead with him to blaze the trail which the saints would follow into their new homelands. They virtually moved mountains, as they chopped down trees, moved boulders and eliminated many of the difficulties and dangers which would have faced the saints had it not been for C. C. Rich and the men with him. They made the path for the families to follow.

This trail led north past the Cache Valley, through the new settlements between Logan and the Idaho border and into Idaho’s Emigration Canyon with its beautiful mountain streams and the forests of fir and aspen. They reached the top of the divide and the lovely valley of the Bear Lake lay below them. The scouts first entered the valley on the 26th of September 1863. They set up their headquarters in what is now known as Paris, Idaho. They had made it, now it was time to bring families into this valley. Permanent settlers arrived during the next several weeks. Forty-eight men, forty women, and about thirty children were the first to stay in the valley. They only had log cabins with dirt roofs to shelter them through the coming winter, and the Lord blessed them with the mild winter of 1863-1864.
Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball visited them as soon as the snow melted the next spring. They found the new settlement with people busy plowing, fencing and planting. President Rich’s son, Joseph, has written, “What a country. Streams full of fish; the most beautiful lake on earth; wild game; grass up to a horse’s belly; timber in the mountains; fine location for town sites; everything!”

Brigham Young counseled the new settlers, “We cannot live without law. Be sure to say your prayers night and morning. If you stop praying you will forget God. Don't go alone to the canyon for timber. Build your cabins close together so you can defend yourselves. Keep your guns and ammunition dry and close at hand. Feed and clothe these Indian neighbors as freely as you can. Never turn them away hungry. Teach them to plow and plant and harvest. Be patient with them. They are children. If they steal, don't think you have to use your guns. Be just and quiet, firm and mild, generous and watchful. Learn to speak their language. Live the Golden Rule. What if you had been born with dark skin yourself?"

William Moore Allred had been acquainted with C. C. Rich from the Missouri and Illinois days, and it is not surprising that he included Brother Allred in his list of faithful followers. William sold his property in the Tooele Valley and moved to the Bear Lake Valley. He arrived in St. Charles, Utah (now Idaho) on the 26th of May 1864 along with his wife, Orissa Bates Allred, six sons, three daughters, and a son-in-law (two more sons would be born in this valley). He built what is believed to be the first house in St. Charles.

More than seven hundred people came to Bear Lake Valley in 1864, along with the Allreds. They did not have doctors, courts, saloons, or jails. They shared their lives with each other. They kept what little money they had to themselves as there were no banks. They sent for medicines into Salt Lake and Logan and often went without. They bartered almost everything. Wood, poles, lumber, fence posts, shingles, wheat, oats, potatoes and seed. They shared everything they had, even their meals, whether the neighbor was just passing through or living close by. They paid their tithing with the produce, animals and what little money they gained. They were an industrial people and the workmanship in their homes was as good as any in the larger cities. This is evident by the fact that many of the homes built in the 1860's are still standing and many being lived in today in the 1990's.
Children and schools always went together. They paid their school teacher with produce. The school lasted only a couple of months in the winter; however, some very well educated students came from their school and when applying to higher education facilities away from that valley they were readily accepted. A book, slate, and spelling book took care of the learning needs and most of the time the only available supplies. These, too, they shared.

They built corrals for their cattle; fences to keep the cattle from their fields and canals to bring water into those fields for irrigation. They planted early because the season was short, and often had to plant again when frost took what had started to grow. They used coffee mills in their homes to grind their wheat until a grist mill could be built. Many times flour was made from frozen wheat. It was dark and sticky and so was the bread they made from it, but they ate it. Peas always grew well. They withstood the frost and because the climate was cool, they produced longer than in the lower valleys. Heat in the lower valleys would dry them too fast. However, even when they dried, they would still use them. Potatoes came along in time to be mixed with the peas, and the taste of this fine dish made the residents of this valley believing they were Kings in their own kingdom.

They planted fruit and berry bushes of any kind that would survive the cold winters. They not only harvested the produce but they harvested the seed for another year. This was true of all of the vegetables and grains. The hay and grains were also used to feed their horses, cows, pigs, chickens and any other animals on their lands. Sometimes it was shared with the wild animals, and the settlers used these animals for meat also.
Snow was a problem, from October until June. It came early and stayed late, confining the valley residents to their small towns and homes. Bobsleds at once became the way to travel and were used as much as wagons. Everyone had to have snow shoes. Sometimes it was impossible to go anywhere without them. When the snow melted or it rained, there was mud, thick, heavy, impassible mud.

The Allreds were a very talented people and they provided entertainment not only for themselves but for their community. They would write their own plays and act in them. They played musical instruments and they loved to sing. They purchased an organ and recitals were performed by the family.

Everybody loved to dance. The entire population of the town and sometimes neighboring towns were included in these dances. Usually the younger ones danced in the afternoon and the Adults danced in the evenings.
Baseball was the entertainment for the entire community in the summers. The ones not playing would enjoy watching. It seems that each community had their own ball clubs and they would challenge each other. So when the hard work was complete, they relaxed and enjoyed what recreation they could furnish for themselves.
Fewer families came to settle the valley than were called. Fear weeded out many. Some had already endured many hardships and felt that they could endure no more. Many came and after a short time, left. President Young and Brother Rich called new families at conference time with names announced from the pulpit. When people got discouraged and told President Rich they wanted to leave, he’d smiled and wished them good luck, but he said he had been called by a Prophet of God and was staying. William Allred and his family stayed with him. Many of their descendants are still living in the valley.

With the persecution of the men who had taken a second or third wife, many of the Allred family were forced to flee from that valley rather than desert their families. First they went into Star Valley, Wyoming Territory, but after the manifesto in 1890, some of them went into Canada and Mexico. They were not unfaithful to their prophets voice, because once again he advised his people where to go and what to do. And they followed.

1865
On the 5th of October 1865, Nelson Calvert (Allred) was born (7th son).

1866
In 1866 I worked with Brother N. C. Davis building a saw mill for Wm. G. Young and N. C. Davis (Wm. G. Young being the Bishop of St. Charles). In this year David Taylor commenced to build a grist mill, and I worked on that most of the time till it was done. I think it was finished in 1867.

1867
On the 23rd of Jan. 1867, our oldest son, William Lansing, was married to Sarah Ann Wilkes, and on the 5th of Oct the same year our second son, Byron Harvey, was married to Phoebe Irene Cook, and on the 29th of November the same year, our eighth and last son was born, and we called his name, Orson Pratt (Allred).
About this time I acted as Justice of the Peace for a while, and then as county clerk and county recorder and then as pound-keeper.

1868
I think it was in 1868 Marvin (19 years old) went to help (21) bring in the immigrations from the states (United States).

1869
Done more work for P. Taylor also Rich & Duffin.

1870
On the 24th of Aug 1870 Adaline's little girl Luella Viola died, about one year old, and on Dec 28th same year, Angelia Lorissa died about 5 years old.
Not far from this time I was appointed Superintendent of Sunday School in St. Charles, (or perhaps a little before.)

1871
My brother, James, died Apr. 14th, 1871. (Found at the top of the page.) In 1871 the grasshoppers ate up our grain and I had to go to Soda Springs to work to get my bread stuff.
And on the 17th of July, Marvin was married to Amanda Jane Bird of Paris.

1872 and 1873
In the winter of 1872 and 1873 I worked on grist mill for C. C. Rich. I think in 1872 or 1873 while Joseph F. Smith was here, he prophesied that the grasshoppers would leave us if we would do right, and we have had none since, although I presume we have not done everything right. When I was in San Pete I learned the date of my Father's death. Father (Isaac Allred) died Nov. 13th 1870 in San Pete. (Date written on side of page.)

1874
In 1874 nothing particular. Only we had tolerable good crops, and I was acting as agent for the Desert News, and the Juvenile Instructor but I think not far from this time my father died in San Pete. I have forgotten the date. I had forgotten to say that after my mother died, my father married a widow woman by the name of Matilda Park, and she had a daughter, and called her Matilda.

1875
On the 27th of Jan 1875, Marvin lost a little boy (Marvin Delbert) a little over one year old and on the 31st of May 1875, Medwin was married to Mariah Stock. And on the same day, Orissa was married to William C. Wilhelmsen, in Salt Lake City (Utah).

1876
In the spring of 1876, my wife and I went to Logan to their Conference, and that was the last time I heard Brigham Young preach.
On the 24th of May 1876, Lydia Lavette was married to (22) Christopher A. Merkley, soon after we came from Logan.
(Note: the statement ‘Homesteaded 1/4 section of land’ was written within the sentence on the top of page 22.)

1877
In 1877 I was appointed Stake Superintendent of Sunday Schools in the Bear Lake Stake of Zion.
On the 29th of August 1877, President Brigham Young died. But Church history will tell such thing, better than I can.
I have overlooked the death of Lansing's little boy, John Wilkes (Allred), died March 14th 1874, nine months old.

1878
On the 24th of January 1878, Adaline lost another little girl, Alice Loretta, not quite one year old. When she was laid out she was limber and someone said that another one would go soon.
Now comes the most sorrowful time of all my life, after all of our troubles of persecution, sickness, poverty, and death, just as we were getting in circumstances to live more comfortable, our children that were married (7 in number) all living near us, my wife was taken sick very suddenly on the 27th of January 1878 and died on the 29th. She was taken sick about 12 O'clock just as Sunday School was dismissed. Some of the Sunday School children said they thought she was more cheerful, and sang better that day than common, she always delighted in being with the children, as she had taught school a great deal, and the Sunday School children thought everything of her. She was a great help in the Sunday School. As I had been appointed Stake Superintendent, I started that morning to visit another School and when I started in the morning I said "Good Morning" to her, not thinking for a moment, that would be the last time in this life that I could speak to her, as she was unconscious when I got home, and (23) she was not able to speak to me, she was a very kind and affectionate wife, and mother. She left me with four boys at home, and no girls. And it was quite hard to get along, but Edgar, my second wife's son, and being the oldest (age 20) boy at home, and being very handy about the house, he took hold of the work, as handy as a great many girls could do. But when it began to come spring I found it would be very bad for him to come in from work and cook the dinner, but he done very well indeed.

I continued my labors (in the church work) for awhile, but the Stake Presidency thought I could not fill both places. That I would have to neglect one or the other, and gave me my choice to resign one or the other. And I told them I was so attached to the St. Charles School, I would rather keep that place. So I resigned the Stake Superintendency.
On the 13th of March, Adaline lost her baby, Angel Edna, about nine months old.
After we had kept house in this way for awhile I got a women to keep house that had lost her husband, and all of her children, by the name of Mary E. Perkins (Osborn) that I had been acquainted with before she was married. She had a girl that was given to her when she was about four years old. Her name was Elizabeth Hampton. I had always been conditioned to think it something terrible and not showing due respect to a deceased wife to marry again so soon, but under the circumstances it was thought best by some of my friends to take her into the family as a wife. (Thought it would be better for me and for her, too.) She came here to keep house the 27th of March and we were married on the 28th of May, and she proved to be a very good housekeeper. She was about twelve years younger than I was (he was 66 years old).

This same spring Byron moved to Garden City in Utah about 12 (24) miles from here, and either that season or the next, Medwin and Orissa moved up there, and in a year or two, Orissa moved back again.
I had been for several years very subject to indigestion and biliousness, and my health failed very fast and some thought I would not live long. And in fact I began to think so, too. I had a very bad cough and I thought my liver was affected, but Dr. Benedict said it was Bronchitis, and sent me some medicine that helped my wonderfully. So that I got to be 50 percent better. I think there was three springs (of the years) right along that I was not able to go to the farm while the boys sowed the grain. I think in 1881 and 1882, we had a pretty good time hauling lumber for the Oregon short line railroad, that was being built down Bear River.

1882
On the 3rd of September 1882, as Medwin was coming down the canyon from Cache Valley into Garden City, (he) had his family in the wagon, his little girl fell out of the wagon, and it ran over her. This was in the afternoon, and she only lived till the next morning, and died on the 4th (September 1882). Her name was Edith Mariah. I think she was about four years old. We went up to the funeral.

1883
In February 1883, I received a Diary Book for one year from the (Deseret) News office with day of week, and day of the year, so I commenced from that time to keep a short daily record, or Journal, which I will now copy, and I may think of some incidents that will be worth relating.
February 1883

Friday February 4th I Received the Diary (1883). Saturday 10th I went to Conference at Paris and stayed all night. Sunday 11th at Conference had a very good meeting but I took a little cold. Mon. 12 at home not very well. Br. D. Osborn & wife were here, wrote a letter to Laron Pratt. Byron sent word that Matilda's baby was dead & for me to come up as the funeral would be that day but I did not feel well enough to go.
Tues. 13th went to funeral of A. B. Clack's baby. Wed. 14th went to Paris on business with Br. L. Laker. Moroni Davis & wife came on visit & to mill. Th. 15th visiting at A. J. Birds with Br. Davis & wife. Orissa's baby was not very well. Fri. 16th at home reading the News. Orissa baby better. Sat. 17th pretty cold weather. I wrote to Byron and L. Pratt and a Card to the Juvenile Instructor Office. Sun. 18th at Sunday School & meeting concluded to have a Dance on Friday the 23rd. Mo. 19th at home. Seymour & Orson went for hay. My health was not very good. Tues. 20th About home not very well. Arnbrozine & Kate Laker here at funeral of Br. Hemerts baby. Nice weather. Wed. 21st At home, rather feeble. Wrote a letter to Bishop Benion for Marvin. Mr. Cleveland's baby died. Th. 22nd attended Conjoined meeting at night. Neils Mortensen's baby died. Fri. 23rd expected to have a dance for the Sunday school but had two funerals instead. Marvin came up from the Ranch as he was taking care of the Church Cattle and Ranch. Got a letter from Byron. Sat. 24th about home. Marvin's folks went back to Ranch. Layette's baby was not very well. Boys cleaning out the well. Sunday 25th at Sunday School & meeting. Took dinner at T. A. Furniss. Mon. 26 about home. Sister Hale & Br. Hales sister Olive were here. Tues. 27 about home, not very well. Wed. 28th I was feeling a little better. I went to see how Layette's baby was. Nice weather. Got a letter from Byron, he wanted me to go up there to a Theater.

March 1883

Th. lst March, at Fast meeting. Layette's baby was quite sick. I went to see her. I was not feeling so well. Medwin came down from Garden City. There was considerable sickness among the small children in the settlement. Fri. 2nd attended the Primary dance. Layette's baby very sick. Sat. 3rd went to Paris to Priesthood meeting. Medwin's wife Mariah had a son. Very nice weather. Sun. 4th attended Sunday school and meeting. Layette's baby is better. I got a Card from Byron. Mon. 5th about home. Wrote a letter to Juvenile Office. Tues. 6th I felt a little better, worked out doors a little. Layette's baby was a little better.
Wed. 7 felt pretty well, worked some, attended High Priests meeting at night. Thur. 8th splitting wood. Adaline was here. Layette's baby was better. Attended Conjoined Meeting at night. Fri. 9th killed 2 pigs. Read letter for Marvin from Bp. Benion. Sat. 10th grinding meat. Singing Practice at night. Lavette went home to the Ranch. Sun. 11th attended Sunday school & meeting, had a good School and made arrangements for a dance. Mon. 12th Splitting wood. Had a good dance at night. Marvin's folks came up from the Ranch. Tues. 13th went to Marvin's on a visit. Julian Wilcox gave me a picture--the declaration of Independence. Wed. 14th went to Montpelier on a visit. Stayed at Br. Moroni Davis. Th. 15th visiting at David Osborn and then went to Bennington and stayed at Br. Vanorman's. Fri. 16 went to Ed Merritt's to see old sister Dustin and came back to Geo. Lindsey's & stayed all night. Sat. 17th attended High Priest meeting at Bennington and then went to Montpelier. Sun. 18 attended meeting at Montpelier, and then went to Marvin's and stayed all night. Mo. 19th came to C. A. Merkley's and got dinner and then came home.
Tues. 2Oth Br. Furniss baby died. Wrote a Card to Laron and one to Marvin. Wed. 21 attended the funeral. Byron and Irene came down from Garden City. Had S. S. singing Practice. Th. 22nd Br. Furniss & wife were here. Had Conjoined meeting at night. Had very nice weather. Fri. 23. Read letter from Mr. Lowell. I think in regard to a Threshing Machine that we had bought. Attended a big dance for the last day of school that had been taught by David J. Ross Jr. Sat. 24th worked at the wood. Wrote to the News and Juvenile Office. Had some rain. Sun. 25th attended Sunday school & meeting. Had some rain. The snow is going off very fast. Mo. 26th I was fixing the chicken Coop, commenced Sifting wheat for seed to sow, wrote to News Office. Tues. 27 about home. Paid some wheat in boot in horse trade. Medwin came down from Garden City. Wed. 28 I went to Paris to a Council Meeting. Adaline had a Son born. (Ansel, Edna)
Th. 29 1 sent $151.00 to Mr. Lowell for Machine. Fri. 30 went to Byron's expecting the would be a Theater, but there was none. Went to meeting at night. Quite stormy weather. Sat. 31 went to Medwin's and Br. Deans, and then came home. Quite bad weather.

April 1883

Sun. lst April attended Sunday school and meeting. The Relief society held a meeting to send some one to Salt Lake to learn Obstetricks. Mon. 2nd expected to start to Salt Lake City to Conference but did not start. Splitting wood. Tues. 3rd. Started to conference and got to Marvin's at the Church Ranch and stayed all night. Wed. 4th went to the Depot and started 1/2 past nine. I will here say that this was the second time I ever rode on the Cars and I think it was about the 1872 or 73 that I first saw the Cars. Th. 5th Got to Salt Lake City at 12 0 Clock, noon. Went to meeting after noon and found my Br. Reddick who I had not seen for many years. He did not know me. I saw many more friends. Friday, April 6th attended Conference, had a good time. I forgot to say the night after I got to the City I attended a Childrens Concert where there were about two hundred Children singing, lead by Br. E. Stevens, and it was the grandest affair I ever saw in my life, anything of that kind. Sat. 7th attended Conference, had a splendid time. I saw many friends at Priesthood meeting at night. Sun 8 attended meeting, enjoyed myself splendid. I stayed with Laron Pratts folks. They were very kind indeed. I went to see Dr. Benedict. Mo. 9th started for home. I brought a lot of Sunday school Books as Prizes for the S. S. Children and they were very much pleased with them.
Tues. 10th Got to Montpelier in the morning and met Edgar there with a team; we got home that night. I found Aunt Mary sick. Wed. 11 about home conversing with friends about my visit and the Conference. It was very stormy weather, about two feet of snow on the ground in some places, but things looked quite green in the City. Th. 12 Br. Furnis and his wife were here. The snow was going off and made it very muddy. I wrot a Card to Laron Pratt, as I had promised. Fri 13 at home reading Sc. Very cold stormy weather.
Sat. 14 a little warmer. Medwin came down. I wrote a letter to Dr. Nelson Bates. Marvin & family came.
Sun.15 attended Sunday school and meeting. I was called upon to speak and give an account of the Conference, and some others gave an account of Confer. Mo. 16 spliting wood. A little better weather. Marvin and family went back to Church Ranch. Tues. 17 began to work in the garden. Seymour got in his wheat at Br. Wests, about the first Sowed. Wed. 18 planting Peas in garden. The boys put in ten acres of wheat. Adaline and sister Clark were here. Th. 19 triming Curant Bushes. Boys put in more grain. Fri. 20th I finished triming bushes. Br. David Osborn and his wife came over on a visit. Sat. 21. Garden City folks came down and had a theater at night. It was very cold windy weather. Sun. 22 attended Sunday school and meeting. It was very cold. Byron, Marvin, and Medwin were here. We took dinner at Br. A. L. Hales. Mo. 23. Marion Perkins and his Mother were here. We sent some Cattle to the Ranch for Marvin to herd. Tues. 24, cold and windy weather, the boys were plowing. Marion and his Mother went home. I got some Money from Marvin. Wed. 25, Snow about 3 inches deep, but a little milder. We went to Br. Wilkes to a birthday party. I wrote a letter to Dr. Seymour B. Young about the Small Pox as we heard it was in Montpelier. Th. 26, worked some at fence. The boys pulled Seymours Mares tongue out one side of her mouth to give her some Medicine, and she bit off her tongue. She could scarcely eat but she made out to live till fall and then she died with the Texas mange. Fri 27, worked at fence. Vetriold some wheat to sow. Sat 28 The boys finished sowing wheat. We had some rain. I helped to fix the Curtain to have a theater. Sun 29 attended Sunday school and meeting and delt out our Prizes. Attended Teachers meeting and Conjoined Meeting of the young men & Ladies. Mo 30. I was cuting potatoes to plant. Seymour was with Marvin attending to Cattle. He came home to see his mare, she was getting better.

May 1883

Tues May lst, planting potatoes. Rather cold and (?). Wed 2nd quite cold, some snow. Seting out onions. Edgar furrowed out the wheat. Th. 3rd, more mild, but snowed about 5 inches deep, but went off fast. (Fast day. ) Got some vaccine from Doctor S. B. Young to vaccinate the family, but it did not work on all. it made Orson very sick indeed. Fri 4th worked some on the fence, vaccinated 5 of the family, as the small pox was in Montpelier. Sat. 5 went to Paris to Priesthood meeting but there was none. Nelson helped Lansing plow. Sun 6 attended S. S. and meeting, had a good meeting. Elders M. Booth and L. Laker Spoke also the
Bishop, (John A. Hunt.) Mo 7 cuting potatoes to plant, the boys planting Peas. Tues 8 work at fence, quite cold wind. Amanda and the Children came from the Ranch on a visit. Wed 9 it rained in the morning. I wrote a letter to Laron Pratt and one to A. H. Cannon. Marvin came up from Church Ranch on visit (also Seymour). Th. 10 planting Beets, Carrots, Turnips & c. Marvins folks went home to the Ranch. Fri 11 making door and window frames for Edgar. The Lake is not entirely broken up Sat 12 planting corn, did not feel quite so well. The Lake broke up. Byron and Irene came down to have a tooth drawn for Irene, drawn by A. B. Clark but she fainted and fell with fear before the tooth was drawn, but she mustered courage and had it drawn. Sun 13 attended Sunday school and meeting, did not feel very well, took dinner at Adalines, got a letter a from Doctor N. Bates, my Bro.-in-Law. Mo 14 worked in the garden. Medwin and his family took dinner with us. I filled out a Blank for Sunday school that had been sent to me from David C. Cook of Chicago. Tues 15 worked some in the gardin did not feel very well. Nelson went yester day to help Marvin move. Wed 16 worked on fence. Quite cold at night. Th 17 worked at the fence, it was pretty cold, we had some rain. Took dinner at Br. Furnisses. Nelson came home from helping Marvin move from the Church Island to the summer Ranch. Fri 18 hauling Manure, quite cold wind. Sat 19 planting beans. the boys started with 2 loads of Shingles to Montpelier but could not get there for the mud at the out let. Sun 20 attended Sunday school and meeting, also Elder's meeting and Conjoined meeting took dinner at Br. Furness. Mo 21 fixing up pasture fence. boys worked on water ditch. Tues 22 went to Paris after some lime for Edgar, planted some Radish seed. Wed 23 Surveying water ditch on the Island for some snow for the hay land, but it would not work well, that is we could not get the water that way. Th 24 worked on Edgars frames. Ole Petersen helped me, it was quite cold, some snow. Fri 25 helped raise Edgars house, cold wind. Sat 26 got Edgars house up to the square. Sun 27 attended Sunday school and meeting. At 3 o'clock attended funeral of Ola Hansons child that was drowned in the mill race up in the Canion. Mo 28 worked water ditch at spring Creek, worked some in the Garden, set out some Cabage plants. Tues 29 worked water ditch in the Pasture, some rain, and snow, some Frost. Wed 30 work at water ditch, set out more cabage and sent Money to the News and Instructor Office. Th 31 finished water ditch. Nelson was rolling the wheat. I was hoeing Peas in Garden.

June 1883

Fri 1st June. I watered Garden and went to a quilting at Br. Wests. I got a card from Laron, some rain. Sat 2 attended Priesthood meeting at Paris, heard the small Pox was worse in Montpelier. Marvins folks came up from the Church Ranch. Sun 3 at S. S. & meeting Brs Hardy & Valentine Preached, took dinner at Br. Cheens. Mon 4th I was watering the Garden. Marvins folks went home. Tues 5 repairing an old wagon & Edgar and Seymour were hauling lumber. Nelson after horses. Wed 6 worked at an old wagon and fixing fence at the little Pasture. Th 7 finished the wagon and went to Fast meeting watering Lucern etc. The Crab apple tree in the Garden was begining to blow out quite fast. Fri 8 I made a dinner box, the boys took two load of grain to the Rail Road for the store. Miss Ladicy Griffith, Aunt Marys great Neice from Richmond came to see us. She had got acquainted with Luanna when she was going to school at Logan, quite a nice girl. Sat 9 seting out strawberry plants, the boys got back. Sun 10 attended Sunday School and meeting, attended high priests meeting in the after noon. Mo 11th fixing water ditch in the field, watering timothy. Tues 12 fixing little pasture fence, worked some on Edgars house. I got a Card from Laron Pratt. Wed 13 worked on Edgars house. Set strawbery plants. Th 14 had a nice rain. Byron & Matilda came down. Fri 15 some more rain. Orson came from C. A. Merkly, his arm was very bad, where he was vaccinated. Marvin came up from the Church Ranch. Sat 16 at work in the garden. Marvin went back. Attended song practice at night for the - Choir. Sun 17 attended s. s. and meeting. Took dinner at N. Merkleys. Seymour started to the City to get married. Mo 18 fixing pasture fence. Worked some in garden. Edgar was sick. My old sow had 12 pigs and saved them all. Tues 19 hoeing peas in the field, worked some in the garden and some in the shop. Medwin came down. Wed 20 lining the house on the farm, hoeing and watering garden. Sister Hale was here. Th 21 Seymour was Married to Claudy Stock. I think a very good Girl. Quite warm weather. Fri 22 Took a grist to mill. Worked on Edgars wagon wheels. it was quite warm weather. Sat 23 commenced watering wheat, we had Nephi Virgin to help us. I finished Edgars wagon wheels. Sun 24 attended S. S. & meeting, also Conjoined meeting. We had a Lecture at night from a Bible agent. Mo 25 the Boys were still watering wheat. I worked in the Garden and done other Chores. Tues 26 the Boys finished watering wheat. Orson watered the Peas in the field, I hoeing Carrots etc. Wed 27 hoing Carrots, the Boys hauling lumber for A. Wilcox. Th 28 plowing potatoes in the lower lot. Seymour got home from the City, and I went with him to Paris to get his Furniture and out fit for keeping house and was pretty well fixed. He went to the house on the farm. Fri 29 hoing potatoes, it was quite warm weather. Nelson was still hauling Lumber. Sat 30 plowing and hoing potatoes in the field. Br. N. C. Davis came from Ashley on business.

July 1883

Sun 1st of July. Attended Sunday School and meeting. Lansing & Sarah were here. Zina was sick. Mon 2nd the boys finished the potatoes in the field. I was hoing potatoes in the lower lot. Tues 3rd watering the garden, it was quite warm. Zina was some better. Wed 4th not much going on. Br. Furniss & wife took dinner here. Marvins folks came up from Ranch. Th 5 fixing a bridge, not very well, hoing some in the garden. Marvin went back. Edgar went with him. Fri 6th hoing in Garden, took dinner at Br. Furniss. I had a very bad cold. Seymour went to Marvins. Sat 7 quite sick, doctoring for my cold, some better at night. Sun 8 attended Sunday School and meeting. Medwin and his folks came down. Sister Holmgren died suddenly. Mo 9, not very well. Attended the funeral. Tues 10 went to Paris on business. The District Court was in session. I was chosen on the Grand Jury. I saw Marvin there. Wed 11th still on the Jury, but came home. Saw Marvin again, he came up here. Th 12 went back again, finished up the business and was discharged, and came home before night. Fri 13 not very well, turned the water off the hay land at spring creek. Took dinner at Andrew Birds. Sat 14, watering the garden. Sun 15 attended Sunday school and meeting. I was one of a committee to make arrangements to Celebrate 24th in honor of the Pioneers entering Salt Lake vally, as that was the custom. Mo 16 worked some in the garden, my health not good. Tues 17 not very well, the boys helped Mosiah haul hay. Wed 18 felt a little better, went to Paris, took 2 pigs to Julian Wilcox. Turned the water of the hay land. Th 19 the boys were watering, oats, Peas, and potatoes. I found the wild oats were geting bad in the wheat. Fri 20 work in garden. Nelson helping Mosiah haul hay. Sat 21 attended Relief Society Conference held here. Sun 22 attended the Conference, no Sunday School. Mo 23 Not very well. Not doing much. Tues 24 attended Celebration of the 24th, was Chaplain of the day, had a dance at night, had a good time. Wed 25 work in garden, the boys went for wood. the water was still runing on hay land. Marvins folks went home to Church Ranch. Th 26 work in garden. David Osborns folks took dinner here. The Hyrum Brass band came and had a dance. They had quite a Band. Fri 27 work some in garden. Wil Grayhams wife, and her Mother took dinner here. Sat 28 some rain fell, not able to work any, in bed part of the day. Su 29 attended Sunday School and meeting, also Conjoined meeting, some Baptising done at the Lake. Mo 30 worked some in garden, some rain. Edgar went to Br. Stocks mill to work. Tues 31 fixing pasture ditch, had some rain.

August 1883

Wed 1st. commenced cuting hay at spring Creek, some rain. Edgar came back. Th 2 went to fast meeting, the boys cuting hay, it was bad weather for haying, so much rain. Fri 3 went to haul hay, but it was too wet. Sat 4 went to Priesthood meeting. Marvin came up from Ranch yesterday and went back to day. Sun 5 attended sunday school and meeting. I was called upon to speak. Attended Relief society meting. Lizzie M. Rich was appointed President. Mo 6 hauled what hay we had cut. Tues 7 work some in the field. Some of the boys started to cut our hay at the Church Ranch, as I had bought some in with Marvin on Church Island. Wed 8 at work in the field, Edgar started to haul hay at the Church Island. not able to work much. Harvey came down. Th 9 made a spout to the well, Very warm weather. Fri 10 watering potatoes in the field. it was very warm, and I was almost tired out. Sat 11 had quite a good rain, finished watering potatoes. Marvin came up and Edgar came back. Sun 12 at S. S. & Meeting. Br. Sutton Preached. Marvin went back. Mo 13 Br. David Hunter was here from Bennington. 'I worked some in the garden. Charley Pearcy folks came. Tues 14, about home not doing much. Wed 15 the boys came back from haying at Ranch. Byron & his folks came down and went to Cooks Ranch to put up hay for Lon Cook (or Lakers Ranch). Th 16 about home. President Taylor and Company came. Hermon cut hay for me at Spring Creek. Fri 17 Pres. Taylor and party held meeting here in the fore noon, had a splendid time. Sat 18 attended our quarterly Conference at Paris, had a good time. Jack Frost hurt potatoes some. Sun 19 went to Conference, had a good time. Some frost. Zina Williams held meeting here at night. Mo 20 fixing the Harvester and commenced cuting grain. Milando Pratt came from City. Tues 21 went to Paris with lumber, the boys were cuting grain. Wed 22 Shocking grain. I worked too hard for my strength. Isaac Hill helped us harvest. Th 23 still cuting grain. Mosiah cut the Lucern. Fri 24 went to Paris to get some lumber plained. The boys finished cuting what grain was ripe. Sat 25 I was helping Edgar shingle his house. Sun 26 at S. S. & meeting. Went to Br. Stewarts to dinner. Mo 27 watering garden, the boys cuting Seymours grain. Edgar went to Paris to work. Tues 28 fixing Harvestor, boys finished Seymours grain. Wed 29 work some in garden, boys cut Edgars oats. Th 30 made a coffin for Osterholdts child that fell into a pail of hot Beer, and got scolded so it died, and attended the funeral. Fri 31 had some rain, cuting Peas, shifting the grain to the upper Bins to make room for threshing and sent a grist to the mill, some rain.

September 1883

Sat 1st Sept. went to Priesthood meeting and brought home some lumber and Edgar came home. Sun 2 at S. S. & meeting, had a sermon on the Reserection. Medwins folks were here from Garden City. Mo 3 shocking Edgars grain, the boys cuting grain, but the Harvestor gave out and did not finish. the Harvestor had served 8 or 9 years. Tues 4 finished cuting grain in the after noon. I helped Edgar finish shingling his house. Wed 5 helped Edgar lay his floor. Marvins folks came. Th 6 worked on Edgars house. Sister Vanorman came to young ladies fair. Fri 7 attended Young Ladies Fair, dance at night. Sat 8 I went to Paris, found Edgars mare. Sun 9 attend S. S. & meeting. Pres. Budge and Br. Sutton preached, had good instructions. Mo 10 put partition in the house on the farm. Tues 11 dressing up casings for Edgars doors & windows. Wed 12 puting up casings and fixing threshing machine. Th 13 commenced threshing, run well. Marvin came up. Fri 14 finished thrashing my grain, had 590 bus grain. Sat 15 helped Lansing haul his wheat, almost tired out. Sun 16 at. S. S. & meeting, conjoined meeting at night, good time. Mo 17 helped Lansing finish stacking grain. Tues 18 helped Mosiah thrash, worked too hard. Wed 19 finished Mosiahs grain. Thrashed timothy. Marvin came. Th 20 fixing my wheat bins, and straightning up. Fri 21 went down big creek to see hay land, had a cold. Sat 22 in bed part of the time. I was quite unwell. Sun 23 went to Paris to the reorganization of the seventies andwas set apart as the senior President of the 6th quorum, (Transfered to this district) by President William W. Taylor. Mo 24 threshing timothy. I was not very well. Francis was here in the evening. I went to see Theressa Merkley and her baby. (Orson sowed timothy. Tues 25 worked on wagon wheel for A. Wilcox. Wed 26 not very well. Moroni Daviss folks here. Orson Started with Marvin to drive Beef cattle to City. Th 27 felt a little better, worked on wagon wheel. Heard that Bishop Robinson of Montpelier was dead, while on his Mission to the States, which was a severe blow to Montpelier. Fri 28 Hermon and Frances started to the City to get Maried (my oldest Grand son. ) Sat 29 finished wagon wheel, heard sister Lindsey was very low, not expected to live. Sun 30 attended S. S. & meeting, had quite a rain at night, heard sister Lindsey was better.

October 1883

Mon 1st Oct., fixing cellar and dug some potatoes. Tues 2 sent Aroit Hale to the Ranch after some horses. I dug some more potatoes. Wed 3 dug some potatoes, doing other chores, quite rainy. Lavette and children were here. Th 4 quit wet weather. Br. South was here at night. It was fast day but did not go, it rained so. Fri 5 the boys started to Newton Austins over the Lake to Thresh his wheat. I was doing a few chores around and diging potatoes. Sat 6 diging potatoes. Orson got back, did not go further than Ogden. Amanda and Children came up from the Ranch and Edgar and Nelson got back from threshing over the Lake. Sun 7 raining, no Sunday school. I went to meeting. Marvins folks started back to the Ranch. Mo 8 quite cold and disagreeable, finished diging potatoes in the garden. heard sister Lindsey was better. Tues 9 raining again. Wrote a letter Br. N. Bates in Ioway. Wed 10 some snow, quite cold, not doing much. Th 11 not very well, diging turnips, better weather. Fri 12 taking up Beets and cabage. Sat 13 diging carrots. Herman and Frances got home from City. Sun 14 attended S. S. & meeting, conjoined meeting at night. Mo 15 rained and snowed nearly all day. We were making out our Machine account. Tues 16 more rain, boys hauled straw for T. A. Furniss. Wed 17 snowed nearly all day, helping put down Carpet. Th 18 more snow, put lock on Edgars door, Nelson plowing. Fri 19 cuting up some cabage for Br. A. Wilcox. Sat 20 finished cabage, made Box to send butter to Laron Pratt, to apply on Deseret News acct. Sun 21 at S. S. & meeting. Went to Elders meeting in the after noon, stoped at Br. Furniss. Mo 22 made some Sour Crout, it snowed very hard. Seymour came home, had been helping Mr. Hunter drive some cattle. Tues 23 Nelson and I went to Nounan Valley where Marvin was at Church Ranch with a load of potatoes and cabage to sell at a rail Road station. Wed 24 stayed at Marvins to help him move back home. Th 25 started home and got to Paris. Marvin moved the cattle to Church Island to feed through winter. Fri 26 got home, found all well, helping Marvin fix up. Sat 27 Stormed nearly all day. Br. Ezra Clark an old friend stayed here, sent butter to Laron by him. Sun 28 plenty snow, no sunday school, went to meeting. Presidents Budge & Osmond and Elder Naisbet were here to meeting and preached, had a good time. Mo 29 quite warm, snow went off, went to Paris to trade. Tues 30 quite warm and mudy, doing chores etc. Young mens association reorganized at night. R. S. Spence at meeting and preached. Wed 31 very nice day, diging turnips, paid my taxes.

November 1883

Th 1st of Nov., went to see about the hay down big creek. Took supper at John Sorrensens. Fri 2 hauled some hay but it was too wet and it looked like more storm. Sat 3 helped the boys haul hay into the barn, rained. Sun 4 at S. S. & meeting, was called upon to speak. Mo 5 had a very bad cold and coughed bad at night. Seymour and Nelson went to the Canion. Tues 6 quite sick with a cold. Edgar & Orson went to Canion. Br. Lambert was here Canvassing for the News. Th 8 quite unwell. Some snow. Wrote to Laron, the boys came from the Canion. Br. D. J. Ross here. Sat 10 went to Paris to the quarterly Conference, Brs. Lambert, Thatcher, and Farr preached a good time. Sun 11 Stayed to Conference, had splendid preaching. Mo 12 a very nice day, not very well. Edgar went to saw logs. Tues 13 Bought a book, "The Royal Path of Life", did not feel well very foggy weather. Wed 14 caseing windows in the house on the farm. Th 15 Stacking wood and doing chores, a nice day. Fri 16 fixing Stock yard and Book cupboard. I did not have good health. Sat 17 doing chores, singing practice at night. Heard Br. C. C. Rich was dead, after a long illness. Sun 18 at S. S. and meeting. Br. A. Jensen had just got home from his mission & preached. Mo 19 went to Paris to attend Br. Richs funeral it was a cold day. Boys commenced going to school. Tues 20 attended the funeral. Brs. Thatcher & Card were there and preached, had splendid preaching. Wed 21 some snow. Byron came to work on Marvins house. We had sing'n practice at night for S. S. Th 22 about 6 inches snow and still snowing. Had a hard wind at night. Fri 23 some wind, snow soft. Nelson went to the Ranch Sat 24 bad weather. Choir Practice at night. Sun 25 at S. S. & meeting. Br. Laker Preached. I was not very well. Mo 26 quite unwell. Wrote and sent money to Laron. wrote to my Br. Reddick at Sanpete. Tues 27 still very poorly. Lavette was here the boys killed a beef. Francis was here at night. Wed 28. quite a nice day. I felt some better. Orissa was here. also Moroni and Sada Davis. Th 29 did not feel so well. very fogy weather we had our cattle drive. Conjoined meeting at night did not go. Moroni Davis was here. Fri 30 I felt some better. Marvin and Edgar went to Paris. Byron was still working at Marvins.

December 1883

Saturday Dec 1st. doing some chores. Edgar came back from saw mill. Byron went home. quite stormy weather, but not very cold. did not attend singing Practice Sun 2. not co very well. did not go to S. S. nor meeting Mo 3. fixing some in Marvins house so the painter could go to work. some more snow, Edgar went to Ranch. Tues 4 done a little more work at Marvins. not well. Wed 5 not quite so well. fixing my felt Boots. a man from Smiths fork came after lumber & stayed here. Thu 6 fixing Marvin's house. quite a cold wind had a man thresh my Peas. Fri 7 clear and cold. cleaning up peas. Marvin came home from Ranch Sat 8 quite cold, doing some more at Marvins. Orson went to the Ranch. Sun 9 attended S. S. & meeting. Presidents Budge, Hart, and Osmond Preached. got letter from Laron Mo 10 helped Marvin some. did not feel well. wrote to the Juvenile Office also to, Laron Pratt. Tues 11. very thick fog. making arrangements for a dance. I took dinner at Adalines. wed 12 very thick fog. not able to do much. Brother Putnum and his wife from Woodruff came and stayed a day or two. th 13 Still cold and fogy. Conjoined meeting at night fri 14 about the same kind of weather. we had a Dance at night for the Sunday School. Sat 15 about the same weather. did not feel well. Br. Putnum & wife went ii D) home. Chris and Lavett came over. Sun 16 attend S. S. & meeting. took dinner at Hermon went to Elders meeting, and then night meeting. Mo 17 not quite so well. Joseph Neibour was here at night. Marvin came home from the Ranch. Tues 18 some rain and snow. Amandas birth day. Byron came to work at Marvins. Irene came too. wed 19 snowed nearly all day. Seymour was Doctoring my horses for the Texas mange. Thu 20 heard that Jens Bondesen was dead a man that had been Crazy for a long time. Fri 21 attended the funeral. I visited the day school. Edgar came Up from the Ranch. Sat 22. more snow. Seymour and Caudie were here. Sun 23 at S. S. L meeting. Br. Laker Preached. Mo 24. this being my birthday my Children (all but Byron and Medwin) came to give me a surprise with their Pick Nick & Presented me with a nice suit of Cloths. and A. Wilcox the Merchant that they got the suit of Cloth from, sent me a nice silk handkerchief & a pair of Sleaves Buttons. and some of the Sunday School children Presented me with a large Comefortor. and it was a Surprise indeed. Tues 25th very stormy all day, and at night we had the worst wind Storm we have had for a long time. wed 26 more mild. some snow. Marvin & Edgar went to Ranch. Th 27 Nelson went to the Ranch after hay. fri 28 more storm in the fore noon. had a dance in the afternoon for the children. and for the older ones at night. Sat 29 Some more storm. Chris and Lavett went home. I settling up for the dance. got a letter from N. Bates. Sun 30 at S. S. & meeting. Brs Duffin and Moris Preached. took dinner at Br. Furniss. Mo 31 very cold, but clear. The boys went to Garden City to a Theater.

January 1884

Tues 1st Jan. 1884 very cold. wrote a letter to N. Bates of loway. took dinner at Adalines. Leap year dance at night did not go. wed 2nd. Settling tithing and doing some chores. took some cold. th 3. quite a wind and stormy time. fri 4 making out Sunday School Report. Byrons and Medwins folks with others came down to hold a Theatre. Sat 5 quite warm again. not feeling very well. Sun 6 attended S. S. & meeting. took dinner at Br. A. Wilcox. Mo 7 not very well. c wrote a letter to my Br. Reddick at Sanpete tues 8 more mild. had an invitation to a surprise party at Sister Lakers. wed 9 had a big surprise for sister Laker had a good time. Stormy day. th 10 killed mine, Marvins' and Seymours' hogs. nice day. fri 11 cut up all four hogs & 14salted them. Hermons wedding dance at night. Sat 12 grinding sausage meet, etc. Sun 13 at S. S. & meeting. Brs. Astle and Bridges Preached. Mo 14 quite cold. writing some letters etc. Tues 15 quite cold but clear. not doing much but chores. my health not good wed 16 quite cold. wrote a card to Juvenile office had singing practice at night for Sunday school. th 17 more mild, spitting wood. went to young mens meeting at night. got a letter from my Br. Reddick fri 18 not feeling so well. over hauling the meat. Edgar, Andrew and the girls came over to the dance. Sat 19 not very well. C hris and Lavette were here. sun 20 clear and cold. did not feel able to go to sunday school, wrote a piece for the Gem, a paper published by the Young mens and young Ladies association. Mo 21 still cold. wrote to Laron. Nelson went for hay. Tues 22 felt some better. still cold and clear. wed 23 took dinner at Lansings, it being his wedding day. th 24 nice cold weather. Conjoined meeting at night. Byron hauling hay. fri 25 a little warmer. got letter from N. Bates. Sat 26 some snow. spliting wood. the boys still doctoring horses. Sun 27 at S. S. & meeting Brs. Laker & Wilcox preached. more snow. Mo 28 quite warm. big snow last night wrote 3 cards. Medwin here. Tues 29 Six years today since my wife died. snowing and blowing. wed 30 about home. bad weather. singing practice at night. th 31 quite warm. went to Lansing's and Orissa's.

February 1884

fri 1st. Feb. quite clear and nice. D. Osborn and wife here. Sat 2 went to Priesthood meeting had a good meeting Snowed at night Sun 3 attended S. S. & meeting. visiting at Marvins with Br. Osborns folks Mo 4 some snow. I went to Seymours, Orissas and Lansings. Br. George Lindsey and wife were here. Tues 5 snowed nearly all day. Br. Lindsey still here wed 6 more snow. Br. Hale & wife, Amanda, & Br. Lindseys folks here. Br. Lindsey started home. th 7 fast day went to meeting. Conjoined meeting at night Marvin came home. Fri 8 very cold and clear. Seymour came from mill. Sat 9 quite cold. Conference at Paris. I did not go. Sun 10 quite cold. went to Sunday School. Mosiah, Adaline, and Francis took dinner here. Mo 11 more snow. Lansing went for hay but had to come back without it. Seymour went to see a Steer. it proved to be one of Orsons that had been lost. Tues 12 very cold. Lansing went back after the hay. it cleared off again. I wrote a card to Laron Pratt. Wed 13 the coldest day. very clear. Seymours mare died Lansing got back with the hay. I wrote to Byron. th 14 very cold. we had a valentine dance for the benefit of the sabbath school. fri 15 Settling dance acrt. did not make much. Sat. 16 quite warm. Spliting wood. William and Orissa came in. more snow. Sun 17 at S. S. & meeting. very stormy. Mo 18 Terable stormy. wrote to Juvenile office for some Song Books Tues 19 more snow. wrote to Jos. G. Young. Seymour went to mill Wed 20 the worst storm yet. Singing practice at night for the sabbath school. th 21 another bad storm. Conjoined meeting at night. fri 22 quite warm and pleasant. Sat 23 more wind but not cold. wrote some cards in behalf of seventy Edgar came up with a horse for Marvin. sun 24 at S. S. & meeting. Ladies Conferince at Paris did not go Mo 25 quite warm. looks like more Storm. Nelson went after grist. Aunt Mary went to Montpelier Tues 26 more snow. Medwin came down to see J. C. Rich. wed 27 quite cold again. wrote to Laron. had Singing Practice at night for S. S. th 28 young mens meeting. fri 29 Quite pleasant. went to Mariah Pugmire. surprise party Seymour got back with load of hay Aunt Mary got home

March 1884

Sat 1st. March. quite a nice day. Sun 2 at S. S. & meeting. Brs. Sutton & Nye preached Mo 3 spliting wood. pretty cold weather. tues 4 snowed all day. Sister Gheen was here. Harvey came after Lizzie. wed 5 rain & snow all day. Lizzie went to Byrons. Matildas boy born. th 6 more rain & snow. went to fast meeting, relief society meeting, and then Conjoined meeting at night fri 7 more snow. then turned cold. Sat 8 more pleasant. had Primary dance. Sun 9 went to S. S. & meeting. Snow and rain nearly all day went to Sister Holmes for dinner. Mo 10 snow 9 inches deep. snow and blow all day. The Song Books came for our Sunday School. Tue 11 not Quite so cold. but had a little more snow. wed 12 more snow. Sarah and Eunice Wilcoxwere here th 13 Nelson went for hay. young mens meeting at night fri 14 fixing grainery door. reading News etc. & spliting wood Sat 15 went to Byron R on a visit. had a good time Sun 16 attended their Sunday school and came home. the Roads were very bad. Mo 17 heard My Bro. Reddins wife Julia war dead. Lansing & Medwin went for hay. Tues 18 Medwin went home. wed 19 more snow. Harvey went home with hay. Marvin came home th 20 more snow. I did not feel so well. Conjoined meeting at night fri 21 more snow and cold. helped some on Marvins well. got a letter from my Br. Reddick. one of his sons had died. Sat 22 wrote to Reddick. attended Choir Practice at night Sun 23 at S. S. & meeting. Prer. Budge & Osmond preached had a good time Mo 24 cold weather. helped Marvin some on his well. spliting wood tues 25 more snow. day school closed. Edgar came home Had a school dance at night Jeff Davis was here. wed 26 I forgot to write in my diary. nothing much going on Th 27 I was spliting wood Nelson went to Ranch after cattle. fri 28 Spliting wood. Nelson came back with the cattle. Sat 29 had more snow. Reading the News. Sun 30 quite cold. Claudie was sick I had to leave Sunday School but went back to meeting. fixing to go to Conference. Mo 31 Started to Conference. Marvin & Edgar, also Mosiah went.

April 1884

Tue 1st April got to my Br. in laws at Kaysville. all well. wed 2 at night went on to City, and stoped at Larons th 3. Saw many friends and had a good visit with them. fri 4 attend Conference, had a splendid time. went to young mend meeting at night. had good teaching. Sat 5 attended Conference. S. S. Union meeting at night Sun 6 attended Conference. and started home and got to Egberts and stayed visiting on Monday. Mo 7. started home at night and got to Montpelier about 2 O'clock, and Met Nelson there with team. got home that night tues 8 no! it was tues we got to Montpelier and got home at night came on the snow with a sled. Wed 9 worked about home. th 10 got out some carrots it was quite warm but there was quite a contrast between this & Salt Lake for all was green & nice and snow from 1 to 3 It deep here fri 11 some rain and snow. planted cabbage seed. Sat 12 snowed all day. I was reading News etc. Sun 13 attend S. S. & meeting. war: called upon with others to speak & give an account of the Conference Mo 14 Snow 3 inches deep. wrote to L. Egbert. Tue 15 more snow. did not feel very well. Wed 16 more snow and almost rain. wrote a letter to Father Osborn and also David Osborn. th 17 more snow. it was terable weather fri 18 some rain. drying up a little in the after noon. went to Orissas. Sat 19 has cleared up. worked some on Seymours wagon Box Sun 20 at S. S. & meeting. had more Storm. Mo 21 more storm worked on wagon Box for Seymour. Pres. Budge called Priecthood meeting here at night and preached. Tues 22. more rain. I did not feel very well. wed 23 worked in the flower garden. and raking up around the door yard. th 24 carrying out the trash. got a letter from Laron but we had more snow in the after noon. fri 25 quite cold weather I felt a little unwell. sat 26 more snow and cold. my best cow died for want of hay. I had to keep her on straw too long. Sun 27 at S. S. meeting. had more snow. Mo 28 more snow and rain. I wrote a Card to Byron and a letter to President Budge. tues 29 I got a letter from Br. Campbell in regard to the filling up of the 6th quorum of Seventies etc. Wed 30 I started to Laketown on that business. more snow.

May 1884

Th. 1st of May I got back to Garden City. Claudies Baby was born today. fri 2 I came home and found Claudie, quite smart, had a girl. I worked some in the garden. but it is a late spring Sat 3 went to Priesthood meeting at Paris. some more rain and rain at night. Sun 4 At S. S. and meeting. more snow and cold. Mo 5 Seting out onions etc. tues 6 at work in the garden planting Peas etc. wed 7 work some in garden and come on little wagon. we had singing practice at night for S. S. th 8 triming bush in the garden. it was more pleasant fri 9 I was on business for the seventies. work some in garden. Byron & Irene came. going to Conference Sat. 10 I went to Paris to quarterly Conference. Sun 11 I stayed at Conference and had a good time. the Seventies were more fully Organized. Some more Presidents & members Ordained By Pres. Joseph F. Smith & A. H. Canon and then came home. some snow in places. Mo 12 I sowed some wheat. the first that I had sowed for three years, my health had been co poor tues 13 planting beet seed. Orson sowing grain. Nelson after hay Wed 14 I was outing potatoes eyes. the boys sowing grain. th 15 Started to Logan to the Dedication of the Temple. fri 16 at the Conference in Logan. Sat 17. attended the Dedication of the Temple. I had a Splendid time. Sun 18 still at the Conference. Saw many friends & Relations. went all through and up on top of the Temple, and it was Beautiful! Splendid ! I started home. Mo 19 got home found all pretty well. Tues 20 sowing wheat and Lucern. wed 21 some more rain. Nelson went to the Canion Th 22 I worked some in the garden. fri 23. puting up fence. helped Edgar some on his house Sat 24 Sowing oats. Sun 25 attended S. S. & meeting. Spoke in Sunday school and meeting about the Temple. in the afternoon we held our first monthly meeting of the Sixth quorum of Seventies in this place. Mo 26 we had come rain. Adaline and Clarence quite sick. Tues 27 Sister Oborn and Sister Kimball. Adaline and Clarence are better planting peas in garden. wed 28 more rain. made a cradle for Claudies baby. Set out some cabage plants. S S singing practice at night. th 29 sowing Lucern seed and oats. set out some cabage plants. fri 30 furrowing out grain had some more rain. Sat 31 I went to Paris and got some corn meal.
June 1884

Sun 1st June. attended S. S. & meeting. Chris. and Lavette, and Medwin, and Mariah were here. Mo 2 working in garden. had some rain. Tues 3 working in the garden. wed 4 had considerable rain. th 5 worked some in garden and went to fast meeting and then went to Spring Creek to settle about the Bloomington water runing on my hay land. got a letter from my Br. Reddick in Sanpete. fri 6 went to see about making a water ditch to the hay land down Big Creek, & went to Br. Gheens Sat 7 I went to Priesthood meeting at Paris. Sun 8 at S. S. & meeting, and Conjoined meeting after noon more rain Mo 9 Spading up ground in garden. Orissa was here. tues 10 worked on gate for water ditch. My health much better wed 11 more rain. wrote a letter to Reddick. worked some on the gate for ditch. had singing practice at night for S S. th 12 puting in gate. helped Marvin some. fri 13 put spout in ditch. got a Card from Laron. fixing stone Sat 14 helping Lansing raise his house. had quite a cold wind. did not feel quite so well as common. Sun 15 at S. S. & meeting. Sister Hokansen died this morning. She was ill only 2 or 3 hours after being confined. quite a number were Baptised in the Lake by Edgar M. Allred, and confirmed by A. Jensen M. Booth, and myself. Mo 16 hoeing and watering garden. Tues 17 work in garden. Nelson went to haul.stone for the Stake Tabernacle. wed 18 worked some in garden. and some on sash for L. D. Young. went to funeral. it had been put off to time for her Brother lb to come from Cache Valley. th 19 worked in garden. Hyrum Jensen died. I lent Byron about 24 bushels of wheat. fri 20 worked some on sash, and went to the funeral, as he belonged to the Sunday School. the Sunday school Children went to the house, and formed in two lines out side of the gate, and then I chose four of the larger Boys to carry the Corpse. and when the Corpse had passed through the lines to the head, the Procession followed his remains to the meeting house. we had a very hard rain while at the Grave. Sat 21 I finished the sash. Nelson got home from hauling Stone for the Stake Tabernacle. Sun 22 nd attended S. S. & meeting, also High Priests meeting Mo 23 Marvin, Seymour, and Hermon helped us haul manure. plowed out potatoes and corn in garden. Tues 24 hauling manure. Nelson got up some horses. wed 25 I started with Sisters Laker, Holmes, and Luanna to visit the Southern settlements. in the interist of the Primary associations. took dinner at Br. Westons in Laketown, and then went to Randolph. th 26 held meeting in Randolph, and went to Woodruff. had no meeting, as they failed to get the Notice. we came back to Randolph. I found Mr. Hunter there. fri 27 came to Laketown, and held meeting. and then drove to Meadowville. 40 years to day since Joseph and Hyrum were killed by a mob, and it had sliped my mind for the first time in 40 years that I did not think of it on that day. sat 28 held meeting in the fore noon, and then came to Garden City. and held meeting, and got home. we had a Splendid time. went to singing practice at night Sun 29 at S. S. & meeting. also High Priests meeting Mo 30 hoeing Peas and watering garden.

July 1884

tues 1st July. Commenced watering wheat. wed 2 finished watering wheat. felt very tired. th 3 watering Pea I in the field, and went to fast meeting and then went to Garden City to Celebrate the fourth. Fri 4 attended Celebration. had a good time & came home. Sat 5 went to Priesthood meeting at Paris. had a good meeting making arrangements for the celebration of the 24th. Sun 6 at S. S. & meeting. Seventies monthly meeting after noon Mo 7 watering and hoeing in the garden. Nelson cut the Lucern and then went to the shingle mill to work. the District Court in Session at Paris. Tues 8 went to Paris to Court. Saw Legrand Young. wed 9 worked in garden. Edgar & Orson went over the Lake after stone for the Tabernacle. singing Practice at night th 10 I went to Paris with the load of stone. Court still in Session fri 11 Young Ladies had an entertainment, had a good time. Sat. 12th the Young Ladies and Primary Conference held here Sun 13 To day was occupied by the Relief Society Pres Budge, Hart, and Osmond were here and we had a splendid time during the Conference. Mo 14 watering Lucern. the Boys pulling weeds out of the wheat. (Cockle and wild mustard) Tues 15 we had ouite a rain. The Boys work on water ditch. wed 16 I was working on hay Rack and helped Marvin some on his back house. the Boys geting wood. fri 18 work on hay Rack. went to big creek for willows. Sat 19 went Paris to see a Base Ball game between the Paris boys and the Woodruff boys. Woodruff beat. Sun 20 at S S. & meeting. Brs. Morgan & Poulsen preached. Mo 21 finished hay Rack.: tues 22 hoeing and watering garden. went to Society meeting. Sisters Kimbal & Lindsey here wed 23 fixing Mottoes and preparing for the 24th. th 24 we had a splended time at our Celebration. we had Utah represented as it was and as it is. also the Pioneers. we had songs, speeches, Recitations, and Music in various ways and all enjoyed themselves. had a dance at night. fri 25 worked some around home, but did not feel very well after being up so late at dance. Sat 26 fixing for haying. Byron and Co. came along going to haying at Lakers Ranch for W. Cook. Sun 27 at S. S. & meeting took dinner at Bro. Sorencen and then attended the High Priests meeting. wrote one letter to the News Office and one to the Juvenile Office and sent some Money. Mo 28 commenced cuting hay at Spring Creek. tues 29 outing hay. wed 30 I went to Garden City after wheat for Co-op The boys hauling hay Th 31 hauling hay. I worked some for Sister Pugmire. Orson took the load to Paris

August 1884

fri 1st Aug. watering garden. worked some for sister Pugmire. Orson went after another load. Nelson hauling hay. Sat 2 I went to Priesthood meeting. Apostle Teasdale there. Sun 3rd. Started to meet President Taylor & Co. at they were coming to be at our Conference. went to Laketown. 5 or 6 carriages. Pres. Budge and Apostle Teacdale and others were along. Mo 4 went to Woodruff. Stoped at Bishop Lees Tues 5 went to Evanston, met the Co. and back to Woodruff and held meeting at night. wed 6 came to Randolph. held meeting and then came to Lalcetown and held meeting at night. th. 7 held meeting in Meadowville., Garden City. Fish Haven, and came home. Choir practice at night fri 8 They held meeting in St. Charles, Bloomington, and then went to Paris. I did not go any further. Sat 9 we went to Paris to our Quarterly Conference we had splendid Preaching and instruction. Seymour & Orson went to put up hay. Sun 10 went to Conference again. had a good time. some rain Mo 11 worked in garden. Nelson went to mill for Co-op. and cut come green oats for horse feed. Tues 12 work in garden & ratting the oats. Nelson went to Paris with the load. wed 13 hoeing potatoes. Nelson went to swan Creek th 14 I went to mill for the load. fri 15 Nelson & I went to Paris with the load, and heard about some Elders being killed in Tennessee by a mob. (Elders Gibs & Berry) on account of their preaching the Gospel of Christ. Sat 16 went to look at hay land. The water very high Sun 17 attended S. S. & meeting took dinner at C. Pearce. also went to Elders and Conjoined meetings.This was My wife OricRaR Birth day. Mo 18 I went to Paris with sister Merkley as a witness to prove up her Home-Stead. Nelson cut Lucern and hay at Spring Creek plowing tome had a heavy rain. Apostle Grant Preached here at night. he is a good Speaker. Tues 19 more rain. put up grist to go to mill. Nelson fixed some poles to make slab fence. wed 20 more rain Nelson went to mill Orson was plowing and Raking hay. I helped Medwin th 21 worked on Spring seat for Seymour. Nelson came home. we had a big frost but done no hurt as I know of. wrote a letter to Laron Pratt. fri 22 watered Strawberryc. Sister Gheen & her Mother here Sat 23 helped Lansing on his house. heard another Elder had been shot & wounded in Tennessee. the spirit of persecution is on the increase. Lizzie started to Cache Valley on a visit. boys haul hay Sun 24 attended S. S. & meeting. had a memorial meeting in the after noon in honor of the Martered Elders that was killed by a Mob. Mo 25 hauling poles and puting up fence through the nag to fence the pasture. tues 26 worked on fence with old Bra. Anderson. a good hand to work wed 27 work on fence and raking wheat that had been cut green, as it had fallen down th 28 work some on spring seat. watering cabage. wrote to Br. Campbell, General Clerk of Seventies. also to E. M. Pugmire, that was to work in the Logan Temple. got letter & Card from L. Pratt. Mr. Mantonya left an Organ here & wanted me to buy it. fri 29 hauled in the green wheat for hay. Sat 30 went to Spring Creek to see about cuting hay. had Choir Practice at night. Orson came home. Sun 31 at S. S. & meeting Br. Brown was here. (got a letter from E. M. Pugmire.

September 1884

Mo 1st Sept. Medwin cut some hay at Spring Creek went to Election for school Trustees. work for Marvin Tues 2 work on Medwins house. he hauling my hay. some frost wed 3 work on Medwins house th 4 went to fast meeting. Sister Dalrymple, Lide Hale, & Amanda were here. made a clock shelfe for Medwin. Marvin came with beef cattle going to drive to the City fri 5 rain nearly all day. worked on a Cradle for my grand childrens dolls. Byron, June, and Edgar came. Marvin and Orson started to City with Beef Cattle. Sat 6 rain nearly all day. finished little Cradles. Sun 7 at S. S. & meeting. Seventies meeting in the after noon. Nelson came home--more rain. Mo 8 more rain wheat fell down badly. Byron, Irene, Harvey, Seymour & Caudie here. tues 9 more rain & snow. picking Crab apples and fixing up the pasture fence. wed 10 had a big frost. outing Peas, picking Crab apples. Some grain was badly frosted. th 11 Hyrum Rich cuting my wheat. some of it was very good. Medwin helping me shock my wheat. Byron, Edgar, and Nelson went to the hay field fri 12 shocking up grain. was very tired. Medwin helped Sat 13 cuting Peas. Singing practice at night. Edgar came back. Orissa here picking Curants. Sun 14 at S. S. & meeting. Marvin got home at night from Ogden. Mo 15 work around at different things, fore noon in the after noon shocking Peas. Orson and Lizzie got home. Orson only went to Ogden Tues 16 shocking Peas. Orson went to Ranch after team wed 17 went after a load of shingles for Br. Wilcox. th 18 went after another load. fri 19 went for more shingles. Orson helping Lansing. took a cold at night Sat 20 quite sick. in bed part of the time. Nelson came home Sun 21 quite sick. did not go to S. S. nor meeting but in the after noon went to the Seventies Class meeting. Mo 22 John Wilkes outing my grain. some was hurt with the frost. Lansing and Edgar helped me shock. Tues 23 shocking grain till noon, then went to Paris with Byron. Irene was here too. wed 24 Raking wheat stubble. Nelson hauling shingles. Orson shocking oats and binding for Br. Clark. th 25 fixing threshing floor. Nelson binding for Br. Clark. Orson hauling shingles. some rain. quite cold. Sold some stock. fri 26. hauling manure. Nelson Mowing. Orson sacking grain with Harvey. Sat 27 attended a stock meeting at Paris. Boys hauling hay. Bought a Tomb Stone for My wife Orissa. Sun 28 at S. S. & meeting. went to high Priest meeting. Mo 29 threshing seed Peas. puting up wheat for a grist. the boys started the Threshing Machine. Tues 30 went to mill and then to Paris with a load of flour for Edgar.

October 1884

wed 1st Oct. got willows to put on hay stacks. very windy weather. Nelson, Luanna, & Calvin started to the City on visit. had some rain and snow. Sow had 7 pigs, 2 died. Th 2 dug some potatoes. went to fast meeting but there was no meeting. fri 3 went to Swan Creek for a load of flour. Sat 4 I took the load to Paris. some rain & snow. Mr. Mantonya came. the man I got the Organ of. Chris & Lavette were here in the after noon. Byron and Irene came down from Garden City. Sun 5 at S>S> & meeting. In the after noon I attended the monthly meeting of the 6th Quorum of seventies. Mo 6 rain and snow. diging some potatoes. not very well. hauled some grain from the Tithing office about this time and then went to mill. stayed all night at Byron's friday night and came home next day with the grist. Met Nelson there coming from the City. he was not very well. Orson had hurt his back while on the Threshing Machine and it made more work for me. then Nelson worked on the thresher. Medwin a& Seymour diging my potatoes. Sun 12 at S.S. & meeting. Hyrum Booth and his Br. Amulek came on a visit. Mo 13 more rain. a bad time for threshing. Tues 14 fixing for threshing my wheat. commenced after noon. wed 15 finished threshing my grain. had a good time. the rain had ceased. th 16 fixing up straw etc. fri 17 fixing beens & heard that Aunt Mary had to go to Logan to do some work in the Temple. Sat 18 went to Paris Convention. met Br. Thatcher. Sun 19 went to Paris to meeting. heard Br. Thatcher and others preach. then went to Montpelier. rain. rain. Mo 20 D. Osborn had concluded not to go to Logan so we came back. They expected to have taken the train. tues 21 doing chores etc. and diging tithing potatoes. wed 22 cut up a load of cabage to take to Montpelier th 23 went to Montpelier. sold my cabage for $14.50 cash fri 24 came home. brought goods for A. Wilcox. Sat 25 went to Paris to settle at Store. the boys came home from threshing at Bloomington. attended a Lecture at night delivered by Doctor Shipp & wife. Sun 26 at S. S. & meeting. Doctor Shipp preached a good sermon Mo 27 diging beets, etc. attended another Lecture at night by Dr. Shipp on the human sistem & Obsterics tues 28 helping Marvin fix his chimney. Br Budge preached at night. wed 29 diging Beets etc. had singing practice at night for S. School Choir. th 30 went to Montpelier after goods for A. Wilcox fri 31 came home with goods after night.

November 1884

Sat 1st Nov. went to Priesthood meeting at Paris Sun 2 at S. S. & meeting. Br Laker Preached. we took dinner at Br Hales. Seventies meeting after noon. Mo 3 Orson commenced plowing. Nelson went to Canon Tues 4 acted as one of the judges of General Election wed 5 worked around home. Aunt Mary started to Hyrum to go to the Temple with her Fathers Family. th 6 work around borne. attended Young mens meeting at night. Br. Savage was here to get a singing Class, but could not get enough pupils. fri 7 worked on Christine Wilhelmsens house and took a very severe cold. sat 8 went to Paris to Conference, but did not feel well sun 9 quite unwell. did not go to Conference took dinner at Adalines. Mo 10 Some better not able to do much. Br Andersen threshing Peas had an earth quake. pretty hard. Tues 11 went to Paris to Court. did not feel well. the earth quake was worse at Paris. wed 12 carrying in Peas. Seymour found our horses that had been gone a long time Sunday school Teachers meeting at night. th 13 not able to do much. Boys geting wood and plowing. fri 14 doing chores etc. Br. Savage came to teach singing not many turned out. not enough for a class. Sat 15 took wood to Paris to pay for Democrat. Aunt Mary came home from Logan. her Father came with her. Sun 16 at S. S. & meeting. Br Sutton Preached. Seventies Class meeting at night. some snow. Mo 17 wrote letter to Laron. Orson went to Mill. Tues 18 quite cold. put up little stove. Card from Laron wed 19 not doing much. husked some corn. Singing Practice at night for Sunday school. th 20 finished corn. Young mens meeting at night fri 21 worked at Stable. Nelson and Orson got a load of wood for tithing. Sat 22 fixing cow Stable. Medwin & Seymour helped. very cold wind Sun 23 at S. S. & meeting. Br. Merkley Preached. Mo 24 work on chicken coop. Mr. Montonya came. went to Montpelier Tues 25 work on Coop, etc. Singing Practice at night. wed 26 Orson helped Survey water ditch at Medwins. Conjoined meeting at night. Br. Woolley was here. let Mr. Montonya have the little sorrell mare on Organ th 27 work on Stables. very nice weather. Calvin got his hand cut very bad in shingle Mill. fri 28 work at Stables. benefit dance at night for Choir sat 29 Orsons Birth day. he worked on telephone Post. Sun 30 at S. S. & meeting. very nice weather. wrote to Laron.

December 1884

Mo 1st Dec. killed my hogs. one weighed 358 the other 384. Marvin, Medwin, and Seymour helped us. Tues 2 cut up hogs. Father Osborn & wife came on visit wed 3rd. Some snow. salting meet. Orson came home had cut his fingers on the edger in shingle mill Sunday school Teachers meeting at night. th 4 grinding sausage meet. went to fast meeting. fri 5 hauling straw. Snow after noon. dinner at Adalines. Sat 6 Father Osborn went with me to Priesthood meeting Sun 7th at S. S. & meeting. Seventies meeting after noon Byron & Irene came down, and Orson went home with them. ward meeting at night. took dinner at A. J. Birds Mo 8 Father Osborn quite sick. not doing much. Tues 9 fixing saws etc. Father Osborn better. Nelson went to mill. Adaline, Luanna, & Francis here wed 10 wrote to Br. Campbell in regard to the Seventies, and commenced to write to Laron. Si~ter Wilhelm sen, William & Orissa were here. th 11 work on stables etc. good weather but cold. fri 12 work on stables. got a Card from Laron. Sat 13 helped Seymour cut up his pig. Sun 14 at S. S. & meeting quite stormy some more snow more storm at night with wind. Mo 15 Still cold & windy. not able to be out much Tues 16 still snowing & Blowing. Sent letter & money to Laron turned to rain at night Edgar got home with hay. wed 17 more rain & snow. S. S. Practice at night th 18 more rain & snow. Settling with sister Pugmire David Osborn & wife came over. rain. rain. fri 19 more rain. quite unwell with a cold. Sat 20 more rain. snowed about a foot at night Sun 21 at S. S. & meeting. still stormy. dinner at Hermons. Mo 22. rain nearly all the time. got letter from Br. Campbell Tues 23. and still it comes do not feel well such weather wed 24 my Birth day. very stormy. a dance at night two men had a fight. Th 25 more storm. Medwin & family Orissa and family all here for dinner. fri 26 more storm. quite warm. fixing calf pen. Orson went to Chris Merkleys. Sat 27 clearing off & turning colder. split wood & reading Sun 28 at S. S. & meeting. Seventies Class meeting at night. Mo 29 attended funeral of L. D. Youngs infant. Tues 30 went to Paris with some flour Big Conjoined meeting at Paris. wed 31 went to Br. Dalrymples stayed all night. very cold.

January 1885

Th 1st. Jan. 1885. went to Montpelier Took dinner at David Osborns Marvin & Amanda went we then went to Moroni Davis' stayed all night. fri 2. I came home. not so cold. some snow. Sat 3 fixing bob Sled. Medwin cut his foot quite bad. Seymour not very well. Sun 4 at S. S. & meeting Brs. Spence & Woolley Preached Seventies meeting after noon. ward meeting at night. Mo 5 hauling straw wrote to Br. Campbell & others Tues 6 sawing wood & hanging meet. Nelson went for hay. Wed 7 Fixing shed for thrashing machine. Went to Medwin's to see how his foot was. Singing practice for Sunday School at night. Thu 8 A very windy day. Sisters Hale, and Clark, and Adeline were here. Conjoined meeting at night. Fri 9 My wedding day. Forty-Three years have passed. Sat 10 Nelson took grain to Paris. Snow all day. Making out Sunday School report. Ambrozini quite sick. Sun 11 At Sunday School and meeting. Not well. Brother Furness’ folks were here. Mon 12 Quite pleasant. Writing to Laron and Nelson Bates. Nelson took cattle to Ranch. Tue 13 Finished letters. Splitting wood, etc. Quite cold. Nelson came from the ranch. Wed 14 Nelson went back to haul hay and hunt some cattle. I wrote a letter to the President of the 7th Quorum on business. Thu 15 Not doing much but reading. Quite cold. Nelson came from the ranch.
Fri 16 Brother and Sister Weaver here. Also Sister Holmes. Big select party at night, but did not go.
Sat 17 Quite cold weather. Not very well. Sun 18 At Sunday School and meeting. Brother Laker preached. Took dinner at Lansing's. Seventies’ class meeting at night. Mon 19 Quite cold weather. Tue 20 Very cold. Nelson came home with hay. Wed 21 Still quite cold. Frances was here and some came in at night, and we had some singing. Thu 22 More pleasant. Had the rheumatism. Got a letter from Loren.
Fri 23 Rather stormy. Writing biography. Got medicine from Loren. (59) Sat 24 Nothing in particular transpired. Sun 25 At Sunday School and meeting. Mr. Booth preached. Took dinner at Brother Furness'. Attended High Priest meeting afternoon. Mon 26 Nelson went for hay. Tue 27 I went to Swan Creek mill and to Garden City and attended meeting. President Budge & party were there. Wed 28 Came home. Thu 29 Seven years since my wife died. Took dinner at Adeline's. Young Men's meeting at night. Fri 30 Nelson went to the ranch. Sat 31 Very nice weather. Children's dance in the afternoon. Sadie Davis was over, had a good time.

FEBRUARY 1885

Sun 1 At Sunday School and meeting. Brothers Budge and Astle preached. Brother Keetch had a fit in time of meeting. Sixth Quorum of Seventies met in afternoon. Mon 2 Nice warm weather. Splitting wood. Wrote to Brother Campbell in regard to the Seventies. Got a letter from my brother, Reddick. Tue 3 Answered Reddick's letter. Had some rain and snow. Wed 4 Rained all night and today. Took dinner at Herman's. Writing in diary. Quite bad wind. Thu 5 Went to Fast Meeting. Fri 6 Writing in my journal. Sat 7 Went to Paris to Conference. Sun 8 Went to Conference. William H. Lee of Tooele was there. Our legislators got back from Boise; viz. (that is): James E. Hart, William Shepard and A. Wright. Mon 9 Went to mill for grist. (Grist: Grain that has been ground or Grain that is to be ground, meal or flour.) Tue 10 Took load to Woolley Brothers to pay on hay land. Wed 11 Writing some. Elders’ Quorum was organized at night by Brother Hart and others. Thu 12 Byron and William Lee went with me to Medwin's. His foot was worse. Stormy weather. Fri 13 Snowing and blowing all day. William and Orissa were here. Also W. Lee. Expected to have a Valentine dance, but it was too bad. Sat 14 More mild. Had a surprise party at night for the choir leader, S. Tremelling. (60) Sun 15 At Sunday School and meeting Bishop West, Elder Hodge, and Woolley preached. a terable windy day. Chris & Lavette were over, and stayed at Marvin’s. Mon 16 Quite warm. Sunday School dance at night. Tue 17 Settling up Sunday School accounts. Wed 18 Still warm weather. Went to the Bishop’s at night on business in regard to some difficulty with school trustees, about election. Thu 19 Still warm. Not doing much. Medwin’s foot bad. Fri 20 Still warm. Bro. Stewart and wife, and Bro. J. Sorensen and wife were here. Sat 21 Fixing to haul stone for the Stake Tabernacle. William Lee got letter about the death of his son, Clarence. And I started home. Grand entertainment at night by the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Association. Sun 22 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies class meeting at night. Chris & Lavett were over. Mon 23 Nelson went after stone over (to) the Lake. Tue 24 A little colder. Nelson went to Paris with the load of stone. Moroni Davis and wife here. Wed 25 Still colder, but nice weather. Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 26 Very nice weather. Took dinner at Marvin’s with Bro. Davis’ folks. Attended Young Mens’ meeting at night. Had to lecture on church history. Fri 27 Snowed very hard in the morning, then got warmer, but got colder before night. Bro. Davis’ folks went home. Aunt Mary went with them. Sat 28 Quite nice day. Reading, splitting wood, etc. Nelson went to ranch and Edgar came home.

MARCH 1885

Sun 1 At Sunday School and meeting, then met with Presidents of 6th Quorum of Seventies to do some business. Quorum meeting afternoon. Went to night meeting. Bros. Cozier and Tippets spoke. Mon 2 Nice day. Wrote, and sent money to News office. Tue 3 Splitting wood, reading, etc. Looks more like storm. Wed 4 Went to Montpelier after Aunt Mary. Stayed at M. Davis’. Thu 5 Attended Fast meeting. Called on to speak. Took dinner at D. Osborn’s. Came home. Stopped a while at Lavette’s. Saw some geese for first time. (61) Fri 6 Working around home fixing to haul grain to Montpelier. Sat 7 Went to Paris Priesthood meeting. Nelson took the load. I came home with Byron. S. practice at night. Snow going off. Sun 8 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies class meeting at night. Mon 9 Wrote three cards to the Seventies in the other settlements. Tue 10 Wrote to Bro. Campbell. Byron came by with load to Paris. Nelson went to help build bridge across slough to ranch. Orson got home. Went to theater at night. Wed 11 Snowed some in morning. Snow going off. Nelson came home. Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 12 Splitting wood. Francis here. Young Men’s meeting at night. Fri 13 Splitting wood, etc. Sat 14 Went to mill after grist. Went on to Garden City. Sun 15 Attended Sunday School and meeting in Garden City. Also Elders’ meeting afternoon, and meeting at night. Mon 16 Came home, did not get grist. Saw the large eclipse of the sun very plain. Tue 17 Splitting wood, etc. Nelson and Marvin took calves to the ranch. Wed 18 Went after my grist. Snow going off. Bad road. Thu 19 Splitting wood, etc. Fri 20 D. Osborn and wife, Andrew and wife, Marvin and wife were here. Nelson got home. Medwin, Seymour, and Orson working on water ditch. Orson had to rehearse for the theater which made more work for me. Went to theater at night. Sat 21 Snow going off fast. Splitting wood. Not so well as common. Sun 22 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Winters at our school. Very much pleased with it. Bros. Winters, Merkley and Bishop Dalrymple preached. Some more snow and turned quite cold. Mon 23 Went to Paris to share holders’ meeting. Some thought the Co-op would break up. Tue 24 Split wood, making posts, etc. Cold night. Wed 25 Went out to farm to throw dirt on the drifts. Thu 26 Set and filed a saw. Took beets out of pit. Some snow. Fri 27 Making posts. Quite cold but clear. Sat 28 About home. Choir practice at night. Sun 29 Attended Sunday School and meeting. Had a good meeting. Took dinner at Adeline’s.
(62) Mon 30 Wrote to Loren, News and Juvenile office. Business meeting at night. Nelson went to ranch. Tue 31 Went to Paris with Medwin to see about his land.

April 1885

Wed 1 More pleasant. Snow going off. Some rain. Glee practice at night. Thu 2 Very thick fog. L. Hale and wife here. Byron and Luanna started to conference at Logan. Edgar came home and went to conference. Conjoined meeting at night. Rec’d blanks from Bro. Campbell. Fri 3 Worked around home. Took dinner at Adeline’s. Sat 4 Wrote to the Ill. (Illinois) Agriculturalist. Card to Byron at Logan. Sun 5 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies monthly meeting afternoon. Quite warm. Mon 6 Getting out turnips. Tue 7 Sowing dirt on snow. Snow going off quite fast. Wrote at night to News office and Loren. Wed 8 Hauling manure, etc. Quite nice weather. Byron and Edgar came from Logan Conference. Thu 9 Digging onions, and fixing for gardening. Luanna got home from Conference. Quite an excitement about the marshals. Fri 10 Plowing in garden and planting peas. Sat 11 Planting early potatoes. Nelson got home from ranch. Sun 12 Attended Sunday School and meeting. Looks a little like storming. Mon 13 Some rain. Wrote to Bro. Campbell and Instructor Office. Was just ready to sow grain. Glee practice at night. Tue 14 More rain. Got out potatoes. Copying my diary. Wed 15 More rain. Nelson started to help Marvin and Edgar. Thu 16 More rain. Fri 17 Lake broke up. More rain. Piling manure, etc. Copying diary. Sat 18 More pleasant. Worked on Seymour’s wagon. Seymour moved over to Medwin’s. Had a pie plant (Rhubarb) pie for the first (time). Sun 19 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Acroid preached, then I attended Elders’ meeting afternoon. Mon 20 More rain, not fit to sow grain yet, then turned cold. Glee practice night. Tue 21 Quite a cold wind. Went to sowing wheat. Got in five acres, but it was so cold I had to wear my overcoat and gloves to the farm. Wed 22 Three or four inches of snow, and snowed nearly all day, but most of it went off. Thu 23 A little squally, but more pleasant. Medwin and Mariah were here. Seymour was not very well. Fri 24 Sowing wheat. (63) Sat 25 Finished sowing wheat. Did not finish dragging. Sawing stakes to make fence. Sun 26 At Sunday School and meeting. At High Priests’ and Conjoined meeting, and took dinner at Lansing’s. Mon 27 Fixing for fencing at Spring Creek. Orson harrowing. Byron and Irene came down to bury J. W. Cook’s child (which they were raising) at Paris. Tue 28 Spading ground and setting out onions, etc. Orson finished dragging and rubbing wheat. Wed 29 Fixing Seymour’s wagon. Setting out onions. Turned cold. Thu 30 Planting peas in garden, spading ground, etc. Took dinner at Medwin’s. Edgar came home from shingle mill. Had cut his finger.


May 1885

Fri 1 Children walking, came and sang in front of my gate, to honor me as their Sunday School Superintendent. Planted some beets, and trimmed currant bushes. Sat 2 Went to Priesthood meeting at Paris, also mass meeting, to adopt or approve. Protest. Sun 3 Attended Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ monthly meeting in afternoon. Byron and Irene came down. Mon 4 Spading in garden. Writing and sending money to the Instructor office. Tue 5 Planting beans, beets, turnips, etc., and sowing oats, cutting potatoes. Wrote to News Office. Took dinner at Herman’s. Marvin got home with stable horse of Mr. Hunter’s. Wed 6 Cutting potatoes and working in garden. The boys finished sowing grain. Thu 7 Work some in garden and went to Fast meeting. Blessed Medwin’s baby in Fast meeting. Boys planting peas and potatoes. I planted some cabbage seed in the hill. Had some rain at night. Fri 8 Cut some potatoes. Went to schoolhouse to elect water master. More rain. Sat 9 Went to Quarterly Conference at Paris, had quite an exciting time about the marshal. Sun 10 At conference, Apostle H. J. Grant was there. Had a good time. Mon 11 Work in garden. Set out cabbage plants. More excitement. Tue 12 Furrowing out wheat. More rain. Set more cabbage. Wed 13 Work in garden. Sunday School practice at night. Some snow. Thu 14 Trimming bushes. Sister Palrymple and her daughter were here. Had fled from their persecutors. Fri 15 Charring posts. Miss Lamcrease here, quite cold with more snow. (64) Sat 16 Very heavy frost. Planting potatoes, beets, etc., in lower lot. Singing practice tonight. Sun 17 At Sunday School and meeting. Brother Woolley and others here. Attended Elders’ meeting afternoon. Mon 18 Putting up fence at Spring Creek. Cold and windy day. Attended Glee Club practice. Got letter of instruction and blanks from Bro. Campbell. Tue 19 Worked on fence at Spring Creek. Cold. Rain at night. Wed 20 Work in shop on Seymour’s frames. Had a nice rain at night. Boys working on ditch. Thu 21 Fixing little wagon and working on Seymour’s frames. Fri 22 Putting up fence at Spring Creek. Quite cold. Sat 23 Fixing for Orson to go to city. Very cold and snow. Sun 24 At Sunday School and meeting. Also Conjoined and High Priests meetings. Orson started to city with Harvey after wagon for Byron. Nelson went to drive stock for Marvin. Mon 25 Work some on Seymour’s frames. Nelson came back with some cows for the dairy. Tue 26 Work some on frames. Wrote to News Office. Nelson went with Marvin to drive the cows. Wed 27 Not very well. Took dinner at Lee Hale’s. Thu 28 Work some on frames. Some warmer. Took dinner at Andrew Bird’s. Nelson got back. Fri 29 Work on frames. Adeline and Luana were here. Quite warm. Nelson went again with Marvin. Sat 30 Finished frames. Went to Primary meeting, then went to see the boys play ball. Robert Pugmire’s team ran away. Tipped over the wagon. Hurt him and Fred Nielsen some and J. T. Barker very bad. It cracked his skull, he was unconscious. Sun 31 At Sunday School and meeting. Writing to News Office.

June 1885

Mon 1 Worked on Seymour’s house, some in garden. Quite warm. Crab-apple tree in bloom. Barker still unconscious. Tue 2 Quite warm. Work on Seymour’s house. Fixing up fence on the farm. D. Osborn and Abbie here. Orson got home from city. Some rain and wind. Wed 3 Work some in shop and some in garden. Had singing practice at night. Some more rain. Thu 4 Fixing ditch at Spring Creek, and went to Fast (65) meeting. Had some rain. Nelson got back from driving cattle. Fri 5 Considerable rain, some hail. Reading the News. Byron came down to go to Priesthood meeting. Sat 6 Ground quite white with snow. Went to Priesthood meeting. Snowed nearly all day, but melted as fast as it fell. Hannah Hill’s girl died. Sun 7 At Sunday School and funeral meeting. Seventies’ meeting afternoon. We had a heavy frost. Killed beans and potatoes. Mon 8 Snowing again. Lansing, Medwin, Edgar, Seymour, and William Wilhelmsen helped us haul manure. We hauled forty-one or forty-two loads. Had choir practice at night. Had no “News” today. Tue 9 Hauling with two teams. Still no “News” today. Wed 10 Helped Seymour on his house. Sunday School singing at night. Marvin got home. Mr. Hunter came with him. Thu 11 I went to Swan Creek mill. It was so very cold and windy, I had to wear my overcoat. Fri 12 Hoeing cabbage. Mr. Hunter started home. Nelson started with cows to the dairy. Sat 13 Made a water spout, more rain. Nelson got back. Boys went to Bloomington and beat their boys playing ball.Sun 14 At Sunday School and meeting. Attended a baptism meeting in the afternoon. Mon 15 Put in water spout. Worked ditch, etc. Tue 16 Work on Seymour’s house. Edgar and Seymour went up to run saw mill. Claudie went to do the cooking. Adeline had a fine boy, born rather unexpectedly. Byron came down and invited us up there to a meeting. Wed 17 Went to Garden City with Bro. Hale and wife to the anniversary of the Relief Society and Primary. Had a good time. Thu 18 Hoeing and spading in garden. Nelson went to mill. Orson was plowing. Wrote to News office. Fri 19 Watering garden, etc. Boys finished plowing. Sat 20 Went to Paris with Edgar’s flour. Bloomington boys challenged St. Charles boys, but got beat at ball. Sun 21 At Sunday School and meeting. A circular was read from the first Presidency. Bro. Piggat preached. I was not very well. (66) Mon 22 Some rain in the morning, still quite warm. Lavette had a big boy born. Tue 23 Writing to Bro. Campbell and sending for licence. Wed 24 Work in garden. Auction sale at meeting house. Mrs. Lacy died. Her funeral sermon was preached by our people, but she did not belong to our church. Thu 25 Work in garden. Fri 26 Attended the funeral. Then hoeing potatoes in lower lot. Sat 27 Hoeing potatoes, but felt quite poorly. Sun 28 At Sunday School and meeting. Also conjoined meeting. Mon 29 Hoeing potatoes in the field. Byron came down. Tue 30 Hoeing in garden and writing letters in regard to the Seventies. Got letter from Bro. Campbell and wrote to him. But felt poorly. Nelson and Orson not well. Brother Woolley’s store in Paris burned down.



JULY 1885

Wed 1 Hoeing in garden. Went to a surprise party to Bro. Lake’s given to Libbie and husband. Father Osborn came over on a visit. Thu 2 Went to Fast meeting. Medwin helped plow potatoes. Had a nice shower afternoon. Fri 3 Hoeing potatoes in lower lot and in garden. Sat 4 Went to Priesthood meeting, also Father Osborn. Sun 5 At Sunday School and meeting. Bishop Mathews of Montpelier preached. Had Seventies’ meeting afternoon, then singing practice as I had been requested to furnish the singing with the Sunday School Choir on Saturday for the Ladies’ and Primary Conference. Willie Brewer got his leg broken. Mon 6 Watering garden and I commenced to water wheat. Tue 7 Watering potatoes. Nelson went to mill. Orson, Father Osborn and wife went to Montpelier. Wed 8 Watering potatoes in lower lot. Singing practice in afternoon, also at night. Thu 9 Still watering potatoes and wheat. Had a mess of green peas. Boys finished watering wheat, then had a heavy rain. Fri 10 Fixing hay rack. Very warm. More rain. Singing practice at night. Sat 11 Attended the Conference. Sunday School Choir done the singing. (67) Sun 12 Attended Conference. Had a good time. Mon 13 Court at Paris, Nelson went to Nounan to help put up Co-op hay. Tue 14 Attended court at Paris. Orson worked at shingle mill. Wed 15 Work in garden, and fixing hay yard. Thu 16 Work in garden, and went to Libbie Laker’s wedding party. Had a good time. Fri 17 Watering summer fallow land to bring up the seed. Sat 18 Hoeing & watering garden. Orson came home. Quite warm weather. Sun 19 At Sunday School and meeting. Went to Elders’ meeting in the afternoon. Was appointed one of the delegates to attend a convention at Paris. Mon 20 Went to Paris to attend the convention in regard to our political rights. Tue 21 Going around to get signers to petition. Wed 22 Fixing stock yard. Quite warm weather. Thu 23 Put up joist and rafters on Seymour’s. Orson helped me. Nelson came from Nounan. Fri 24 About home. No preparation for celebration. *Heard ex-president Grant was dead. Bro. Lambert was here. *(note: ex-president of the United States.) Sat 25 Fixing hay rake and went to Spring Creek to see about the hay. Nelson went to see hay at Church Island. Sun 26 At Sunday School and meeting. Sister Sorensen died in child birth. Mon 27 Orson and I worked on Seymour’s house, then went to the funeral. Tue 28 Orson and I on Seymour’s house. Nelson hauling slabs. Wed 29 Orson and I shingling Seymour’s house. Nelson commenced cutting hay at Spring Creek. Very warm. Thu 30 Watering potatoes. Nelson cut hay. Orson raked. Fri 31 Orson and I shingling. Nelson rake hay.

August 1885

Sat 1 Went to Priesthood meeting. Boys hauling hay. Sun 2 At Sunday School and meeting. Took dinner at Seymour’s. Seventies monthly meeting afternoon. Mon 3 Hauling hay. Very warm weather. Tue 4 Finished hauling what (hay) was cut, and fixing for the boys to go to ranch to hay. Wed 5 Boys started to ranch. Some rain and hard wind. Watering and hoeing garden. (68) Thu 6 Attended Fast meeting. Seven children blessed, all boys. Quite a remarkable thing. Byron came down. I worked one-half day shingling. Fri 7 Shingling Seymour’s house, and fixing to go to quarterly Conference at Paris. Sat 8 Attended Conference and Memorial Services of *U. S. Grant. *(Ulysses S. Grant, ex-president of the United States.) Sun 9 At Conference, had splendid preaching from Elders Stanford, Burton and Apostle F. D. Richards. Mon 10 Helped to send things to the boys by Lansing, Marvin and Edgar, and hoeing in lower lot. Tue 11 Finished hoeing, wrote to News Office, and shingling. Wed 12 Fixing up Edgar’s fence and shingling. Thu 13 Used all the shingles. Very warm. Fri 14 Made pig trough and sawing slabs then putting in slopes (Stops. See 24th) in Seymour’s house. Sat 15 Work on Seymour’s house. Some of the boys came home from the hay field, the hay was good. Sun 16 At Sunday School and meeting. Took dinner at Adeline’s with a big crowd. Mon 17 Boys went back to ranch. Watering garden. Good weather for hay. Adeline, Byron, Herman and Francis took supper here. Tue 18 Work on Seymour’s house — hot weather. Wed 19 Worked some on Seymour’s house. Thu 20 Shingling house. Very warm weather. Fri 21 Finished shingling. The boys came home. There had been so much hard rain with thunder and lightening. Left lots of hay down. Sat 22 More rain. Work on Seymour’s house. Singing practice at night. Edgar came home. Sun 23 Too much rain to have Sunday School or meeting. Mon 24 Very smokey and hazy. Work in the shop on Seymour’s stops, etc., for windows. Tue 25 More rain, work some in shop. Wrote to News office. Wed 26 More rain, pulling wild oats. Work some in shop. Orson plowing. Byron, Irene, Bro. Lansing Bate’s widow and her mother were here from Cache Valley. Thu 27 cuting peas. Orson plowing. More rain with hail. Fri 28 cuting peas. Orson help Lansing bind. Nelson came home, had been to Cokeville with Marvin driving cows. Sat 29 Commenced cutting wheat. Alma Larson cutting. More rain. Sun 30 At Sunday School and meeting. Pres. Budge and Bishop Price preached. Went to Conjoined meeting afternoon. Nelson started to hay ranch. Took dinner at Lansing’s. Mon 31 Cutting wheat. Some very good wheat.

September 1885

Tue 1 Shocking up wheat. Finished cutting. Wed 2 James Pugmire cut my oats. Finished shocking wheat. Thu 3 Finished shocking oats. Cut some peas. Fri 4 Orson and I worked on Seymour’s house. Byron came down to go to Priesthood meeting. Sat 5 Went to Priesthood meeting with Byron. Sun 6 At Sunday School, but did not stay to meeting. Had to meet with the Presidents of Seventies’ monthly meeting in the afternoon. Nelson got home from cutting hay. Mon 7 More rain. Worked in shop. Medwin got home with some fruit. Tue 8 Worked on Seymour’s house. Wed 9 Casing and putting in windows in house. Had Sunday School singing practice at night. I had a sow that had fourteen pigs, and only twelve teats. Orissa raised two of the pigs. Thu 10 Quite sick in the morning, but got better and worked on Seymour’s house. Orson helped me and Nelson cut hay for Lansing. Fri 11 Casing and fitting in door. Boys finished hauling hay from Spring Creek. More rain. Sat 12 Orson and I putting in window frames, casing door, put up gable end, etc. Sun 13 At Sunday School and meeting. Writing letters, etc. Mon 14 Work on Seymour’s house. Nelson cutting hay at Big Creek. Orson hauling lucern hay for Medwin. Boys went to big circus here. Tue 15 Commenced threshing grain. (A. J. Bird’s) (70) Wed 16Cleaning threshing floor. Cutting peas and worked some on Seymore's house. Thu 17 Threshed my grain, had 432 bushels of wheat and 89 of oats. Had a splendid day, but very tired. Fri 18 I was in bed part of the time as I had worked too hard. A small cloud came over and hailed some. Sat 19 Quite unwell. In bed part of the time. Sun 20 So unwell I could not go to Sunday School nor meeting. Marvin was arrested at Montpelier, charged with unlawful cohabitation. Could not prove anything. We had very nice warm weather.

(The following was taken from the Journal of Byron H.
Allred:
“On the 20th day of September 1886, my brother, Marvin A. Allred, was arrested for polygamy in Montpelier,
Idaho, by Marshal Duboise. And a young girl by the name of Mary Osborne was summoned as a witness against him. She being supposed to be his second wife. His arrest was supposed to have been made for the purpose of preventing him from assisting persons liable to arrest to escape as he was at the time following up the officers and by his arrest three or four in Montpelier escaped the officers while making out his bonds.”)
(Note: The girl mentioned here was Mary Osborne (with an ‘e.’ William M. Allred’s wife was also Mary Osborn without an “e.” But W. M. A.’s wife was also not a ‘Young Girl.’)

Mon 21 Quite poorly. Orson went over the river to stack grain for Marvin. Tue 22 Still quite poorly. Lavette was here. Byron came down to work on Seymour’s house. Wed 23 Still very poorly. Byron went home. Thu 24 Still bad. Had bloody flux. Medwin got home with more fruit. Fri 25 More rain. Fixing to go to Logan Temple. Felt a little better. More rain. Sat 26 Afternoon started to Logan with Lansing and Sarah, Marvin and Amanda, Adaline and Leola, Orissa and her Anna, also Ezra and Parley, and Emma Bird. Got to Byron’s, took in Anna Bates and baby, and started next morning. Sun 27 Drove down the canyon some way and camped. Mon 28 Got to Logan before noon, rented a little house. Tue 29 Went up to Richmond to take Anna Bates home. Had a good visit with old friends and came back. Wed 30 Went through the Temple as Proxy for Christian Peterson (who was dead) as a donation for the poor, as that was a custom, in order to gain a little instruction, and refresh my memory. And in the afternoon had Lansing and Adaline adopted (sealed?). Orissa acting for and in behalf of her mother, who was dead. We had a good time, long to be remembered. But I took a severe cold. (71)

October 1885

Thu 1 Started home. Camped in the canyon. Fri 2 Got to Byron’s for dinner. Got home, found all tolerable well. Sat 3 Not very well. Sun 4 A little better. Went to Sunday School and meeting, and Seventies’ meeting afternoon. I had to speak on the Word of Wisdom. Byron came down. Mon 5 Rather poorly. Wrote to Contributor, and News offices. Very nice weather. Tue 6 Quite unwell. Orson also not able to work. Byron came down. Lavette and Luanna went back with him. Wed 7 Orson and I both poorly. Not much work going on for us. Something new under the sun! Conference had passed without a storm -- warm and nice. Should have had Sunday School singing practice if I had been well. Thu 8 Threshing garden peas for seed with a stick. Fri 9 Winding out peas. Had to work very slow. Sprinkled rain at night. Orson quite sick. Sat 10 Snowing — quite a change. Wrote to Reddick. Mr. Montonya and wife here, also Wm. Lee. Sun 11 Not well. Did not go to Sunday School nor meeting. Froze pretty hard. Mon 12 Still poorly. Writing to Bro. Campbell about the Seventies. Tue 13 Bought share (one-half) in shingle mill. Commenced getting up potatoes. Mariah Thorn here on visit from Three Mile Creek. Medwin and children helping with potatoes. Wed 14 Helping a little with potatoes and cabbage. Thu 15 Not very well, but helped a little. Fri 16 Getting up beets, etc. Orson not well. Martin Bondesen died last night.

Sat 17 Attended funeral. Father Anderson died. Nelson broke down wagon. Sun 18 At Sunday School and meeting. Elder Flashman preached a good sermon. Took dinner at Bro. Furniss’. Attended Elders’ meeting afternoon and then Bro. Anderson’s funeral. Lansing’s birthday. Nice weather. Mon 19 Went to Paris to get wagon wheel mended, could not get it done. Tue 20 Cutting up cabbage, etc. and fixing Edgar’s house. Beautiful weather. Wrote cards to the Seventies. (72) Orson went to work at saw mill. Wed 21 Not able to do much. Thu 22 Threshing garden peas. Nelson went to work on shingle mill. Orson came home. Medwin went to saw mill. Fri 23 Quite poorly. Nelson came home. Orson work at shingle mill. Sat 24 Work some on pitman for shingle mill. Sun 25 At Sunday School and meeting, also conjoined meeting. Medwin and Mariah here for dinner. I had to speak in Conjoined meeting, and Orson organ solo. Mon 26 Finished pitman for shingle mill but did not feel well. Tue 27 Orson and I putting up cornice in Seymour’s house. Nelson after lumber to take to Montpelier. Received letter from Bro. Campbell about the Seventies. Wed 28 Nelson went with lumber. Singing at night. Thu 29 Not doing much. Went to Lansing’s to Anna’s party. Fri 30 Rather cold and windy. Not doing much. Some peddlers came to Marvin’s. Sat 31 Doing chores. Choir practice at night.

November 1885

Sun 1 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting afternoon. Pres. Budge and Bro. Findley preached at night. Mon 2 Went around in this settlement with a dry goods peddler. Some rain and snow at night. Nelson went with Marvin. Tue 3 Still going with peddler. Quite cool. Some rain and snow at night. Wed 4 Went to Bloomington with him (peddler). Thu 5 Canvassing in Bloomington and went to Paris. More snow. Fri 6 Went around awhile and came home. More pleasant. Byron and Irene came to go to Conference. Father Osborn also came. Sat 7 Went to Conference. Stayed all night and went to Priesthood meeting. Sun 8 Attended Conference. Had a good time. Came home. Snow nearly gone, quite muddy. Mon 9 Quite pleasant, but muddy. Orson went to shingle mill. Nelson still away. I sawing wood. Tue 10 Nelson came home. Nelson went up to work. Wed 11 Went up to shingle mill to fix the house. Quite cold. Thu 12 Worked at shingle mill and came home and brought a load of shingle blocks. (73) Fri 13 Not feeling so well. Had worked too hard. Orson went after chinch blocks. Sat 14 Quite unwell, but rode to Paris with Marvin. Sun 15 At Sunday School and meeting. Bros. Stucki and Price preached. Had Seventies class meeting at night. Mon 16 Not able to do much. The boys had to go to shingle mill. It looks like storm. Tue 17 Wrote to Bishop Molen, Laron Pratt and News office. Nice weather. Wed 18 Otto (Voight) helped me kill a hog. Thu 19 Went to Bloomington with Sisters Laker and Pugmire, and Luanna in the interest of the Primary Association. Fri 20 Went to Ovid, held meeting and came back to Paris. Sat 21 Held meeting and came home. Some rain and snow. Sun 22 At Sunday School and meeting. Mon 23 Had to sort my potatoes in the cellar as some were rotting. Tue 24 Covering potatoes in the pits. Wed 25 Otto (Voight) and I worked on Seymour’s house. Some snow. Nelson piling shingle logs. Orson plowing. Thu 26 Doing chores, some snow, but very mild. Orson quite sick, severe pain in stomach. Fri 27 Splitting wood. Orson finished plowing. Sat 28 Hauling hay in barn. Went to singing at night. Some snow. Sun 29 At Sunday School and meeting. Bros. Hodges and Findley preached. Orson’s birthday. Seventies class meeting at night. I was one of the speakers. Mon 30 Work on Seymour’s house, nice day.

December 1885

Tue 1 Very foggy. Work at Seymour’s. Wed 2 Went to Seymour’s. Did not work as no one to help me. Splitting wood. Very thick fog. Thu 3 Went to Fast meeting. Fog cleared away, and I worked on Seymour’s house. Fri 4 Wrote to Bishop Molen, and sent him some money (74) to apply on the organ finished at Seymour's and brought my tools home. Sat 5 Went to Priesthood meeting with with Marvin. Byron came down. Nice weather. Sun 6 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting afternoon. Mon 7 Some snow. Quite cold. Fixing pitman for mill. Tue 8 Killed old Rose for beef. T. Furness and Otto (Voight) helped. Cold. Wed 9 Pretty cold. Not doing much. Singing at night. Thu 10 Boys came from shingle mill. Too cold to work. Fri 11 Very cold. Boys went to fix up stock yard at ranch. Wrote to News office. Sat 12 Fixing up shed & settling shingle mill account. More mild. Sun 13 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ class meeting at night. Mon 14 Wrote to News office, fixing slab, etc. Tue 15 Fixing up stables, etc., for winter. Lansing and Sarah took supper here. Wed 16 Splitting wood and hauling manure. Snow nearly all day. Thu 17 Doing chores, etc. Went to Conjoined meeting at night.
Fri 18 Had Sunday School dance for the children; for larger ones at night. Sat 19 Had taken cold. Did not feel well. Marvin’s and Andrew Bird’s folks were here. Also Bianka and Jane Osborn and Jim Davis. Nice weather. Sun 20 At Sunday School and meeting. Adaline’s birthday. Mon 21 Sent letter to my brother-in-law, Joseph Egbert, in answer to a wedding invitation card of his daughter, Corrilla, but could not go. She married William White, a butcher, in Salt Lake City. Tue 22 Some snow last night, but going off. Putting up a bust of Brigham Young in the meeting house that we had bought for the Sunday School. Wed 23 Rain and snow. Very wet and muddy. Splitting wood. Thu 24 My birthday. Paid tithing grain. Very nice weather. Received a present of sleeve buttons, shirt studs and collar button from Chris and Levette. Also a landscape, a view of Bear Lake from Garden City canyon, from Otto Voight, a very nice picture painted and framed by him. Took supper at Adeline’s. Fri 25 Canvassing for the News. Took supper at Herman’s. Went up to Relief Society dinner at night. (75) Sat 26 Snowed very hard. Collecting means to pay for the bust of President Young for our Sunday School Sun 27 At Sunday School and meeting. Pres. Budge and Hart here. Had splendid preaching. The Sunday School teachers pre-sented Luanna with a silk handkerchief for her services as organist for our Sunday School. Also had meeting after noon. Also Seventies class meeting at night. Mon 28 Quite cold. Wrote to News office and sent money to Laron. Went to teacher’s meeting. Nelson went to haul shingle logs. Tue 29 Split more wood. Settled tithing at night. Wed 30 Settled up with O. Wilcox. Snowing and blowing. Had a cold night. Thu 31 Caroline Bondeson died this morning, only about 28 months since her brother died. She was a nice girl. Was a hard blow on the family. It was quite cold. Nelson came home from canyon.

January 1886

Fri 1 Not much going on for New Year’s Day. Went up to Bro. Green’s a few minutes. Very cold weather. Sat 2 Quite cold. Went to singing practice at night. Sun 3 At Sunday School and meeting. More mild. Went to evening meeting. Mon 4 Nelson went to haul shingle logs. Orson went with Marvin after our cattle. Tue 5 Killed two big hogs. Medwin, Seymour and Otto (Voight) helped me. Orson got back, found all cattle. Wed 6 Snowing and blowing. Had good drive. Had Sunday School teacher’s meeting at night. Thu 7 Making out Sunday School report. Fri 8 More pleasant. Splitting wood. Young Ladies dance at night. Byron’s folks came down. Nelson finished logs, got home. Sat 9 Forty-four years since I was first married. Heard the marshal had arrested some at Bloomington and Paris. Sun 10 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies Quorum meeting afternoon, and class meeting at night. Mon 11 Splitting wood and doing chores. Nice weather. (76) Boys commenced hauling hay from ranch. Tue 12 Doing chores etc. nice weather. Wed 13 spliting wood etc. nice weather. Thu 14 Splitting wood. Fri 15 Not much going on. More snow. Sat 16 Primary dance afternoon. Choir practice. Nice weather. Sun 17 At Sunday School and meeting. Elder James Brown preached. Went to Elders’ meeting afternoon. Evening meeting at night. Mon 18 Reading the News. Glee practice at night. Orson commenced going to school. Tue 19 Snowed near all day. Some wind. Snow at night, but not cold. Wed 20 Snow and rain near all day. Took dinner at Lavette’s. Thu 21 Snow and blowing near all day. Expected to go to Paris to shareholders’ meeting, but too cold. Fri 22 Snowing and blowing near all day, but not cold. Sat 23 Quite mild. Some rain. Went to theater. Good time. Rain near all night. Sun 24 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Sutton preached. More rain. Mon 25 Not doing much but reading. Soft weather. Tue 26 Very nice day. Nelson went after hay. Wed 27 More snow. Went to Montpelier. Thu 28 Visiting over there. took a big hog to sell. Could not sell it. Fri 29 Came home. Eight years since my wife died. Sat 30 Went to Paris to Co-op meeting. Sun 31 At Sunday School and meeting. Bros. Laker and Stuckey preached. Went to Pearce’s to dinner. More snow at night.

February 1886

Mon 1 Quite warm. Nelson went after hay. Tue 2 Cut up a large hog, weighed 480 pounds. More snow but quite warm. Colder towards night. Wrote to Laron, News office and card to Seventies. Wed 3 Took dinner at T. A. Furness’. Salted meat. Sunday School teachers’ meeting and singing at night. Thu 4 Attend Fast meeting. Nice weather. Fri 5 Sister Green, Sister Ward, Father Osborn, Jim Davis and Joseph were here. Sat 6 Went to Priesthood meeting. Singing at night. Sun 7 At Sunday School and meeting. Bros. Briggs and Dalton preached. Seventies Quorum meeting afternoon and class meeting at night. Bro. Osborn and Jane went home. Mon 8 Snowing and blowing, boiling brine for meat. (77) Tue 9 More pleasant but pretty cold. Went to Medwin's and Seymour's to see about theatre. Clouded up again. More snow at night. Wed 10 Splitting wood, etc. Not very cold. Thu 11 Quite warm. Boiling brine. Conjoined meeting at night. Fri 12 Warm, some rain. Wrote to News office and sent money to Laron Pratt. Hard wind at night. Sat 13 Went to Quarterly Conference at Paris. Stayed all night. Sun 14 At Conference, had a good time, came home. Quite cold. Mon 15 So cold not doing much. Heard the marshals had taken Bro. Cannon. Tue 16 Writing pieces for theater. More pleasant. Rehearsing at night. About this time heard by brother-in-law, Doctor Nelson Bates, was dead. Died with cancer. Wed 17 Fixing for theater. Rehearsal at night. Thu 18 Splitting wood etc., reading. Took dinner at Adeline’s. Went to Young Men’s meeting at night. Fri 19 Nelson went up to turn water on shingle mill to thaw out the ice. Orson went to ranch for hay and help Marvin with cattle. Sat 20 Splitting wood. Had theater in afternoon for children free, and at night for older ones, in behalf of our Sunday School. Had a good time. Sun 21 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Laker preached a good sermon. Went to Medwin’s, his boy was sick. Seventies’ class meeting at night. Had thick fog. Mon 22 Loaded a load of tithing potatoes to take to Montpelier. Tue 23 Doing chores, etc. Nelson went with the potatoes. Wed 24 Salting pork, etc. Fog gone. Singing at night. Thu 25 Splitting wood. Took dinner at Mr. Cleveland’s. Fri 26 Went around to get donation for Brother Mattsen as he was on a mission in Sweden. Sat 27 Went to Montpelier, partly on visit. Sun 28 Attended Sunday School over there and came home. Quite cold. Attended evening meeting. President Budge and Brother Nibley had been here so I missed a good meeting.

March 1886

Mon 1 Went to Sister Merkley’s to Chris’s and Jake’s birthday dinner. Tue 2 Went to Garden City with Marvin and Amanda. (78) in the interest of the seventies as I had been invited by Bro. Findley (High Priest) to join him on his mission to the High Priests at Garden City. Had meeting in afternoon.
Attended Young Men’s meeting in the evening. Wed 3 Came home. Byron came with us. Had Sunday School teachers’ meeting in the evening. Thu 4 Not very well, had taken a severe cold, but went to Fast meeting and Young Men’s meeting at night. Fri 5 Orissa Wilhelmsen had a girl born. Sat 6 Went to Priesthood meeting. Brother Hale from Grantsville, an old acquaintance, came. Sun 7 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Hale and Bro. Laker spoke. Orissa quite sick. Seventies’ meeting afternoon and class meeting at night. Mon 8 Went to Orissa’s. Some snow. Tue 9 Helped Marvin haul hay. Nelson went to shingle mill. Wed 10 Snow three or four inches deep. Snow near all day. Not out much. Thu 11 Went to Orissa’s. She was getting along well. Fri 12 Cold, bad weather. Took dinner at Bro. Hale’s, then went to hear the children spell. Last day of school. Sat 13 A very blustery day. Delivered over to Brother J. G. Young $12.50 of Seventies money, he being appointed treasurer for the Sixth Quorum. Sun 14 At Sunday School and meeting. Bishop Dalrymple and Bro. Woolley preached. Also went to evening meeting. Mon 15 Hauling hay from tithing corral. Tue 16 Snow — Snow. Not much going on. Wed 17 More snow. Orson went fishing. Thu 18 Quite cold. Meadowville folks came. Had theater. Fri 19 Orson went after hay to Church Island. Sat 20 Hauling hay from tithing corral. Sun 21 At Sunday School and meeting. Took dinner at Lansing’s, then went to Elders’ meeting and Seventies’ class at night. Mon 22 Splitting wood, etc. Orson helped Seymour. Marvin went to court. Tue 23 Lansing’s folks and Bro. Hales here on visit. Wed 24 Went to Paris to the court. Quite cold. (79) Thu 25 working around house. Orson went to shingle mill to haul in logs, brought home load of wood. Nelson came home as it was bad working in the shingle mill. Fri 26 Snowing and blowing nearly all day. N. & O. went to court. Sat 27 Cold, not doing much but chores. Court adjorned. Sun 28 At Sunday School and meeting, also High Priest meeting. Mon 29 Not quite so cold. Wrote and sent some money to Bro. Matts Mattsen in behalf of the Seventies as he was on mission. Nelson went to mill. Orson worked on water ditch. Tue 30 Went to Montpelier on visit. Stayed at M. Davis’s. Clear weather. Wed 31 Celebrating Father Osborn’s birthday, 79 years old. Snow in the morning.

April 1886

Thu 1 Came home, roads very bad, some snow. Fri 2 Snow squalls all day. Byron and Irene and Myra came. Lake down. Folks had a theater. Sat 3 Went to Paris with Byron to Priesthood meeting. Sun 4 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting afternoon. Mon 5 Killed three hogs. Medwin helped us. Nelson went to saw mill. Tue 6 Took my hogs to Montpelier. Only got 6 cts (cents) per cut. Very cold. Wed 7 Came home. Much warmer. Not very well. Thu 8 Split some wood. Not well. Took dinner at Ambrozini’s. Fri 9 Fixed a wagon wheel. Sowed cabbage seed in box. Sat 10 Killed two pigs. Got out potatoes, set tire. Choir practice last night. Roads drying up fast. The lake (Bear Lake) did not freeze over this winter. Sun 11 At Sunday School and meeting. William and Orissa here for dinner. Mon 12 Took pig to Montpelier. Lizzie went with me. Tue 13 Came home, quite cold, some snow. The river was high but we crossed safely. Wed 14 Cold and bad weather. Sunday School Teachers’ meeting at night and singing practice. Claudie had another girl. Thu 15 Shoveling manure. Went to see Claudie and baby. Fri 16 Two or three inches snow, but soon went off. Went to Seymour’s. Eva sick. Nelson came home. Mill broke. Sat 17 Had a bad storm. Five men going to Star Valley. Came and stayed all night. Sun 18 At Sunday School and meeting. In afternoon doing business in regard to sending for licence for the Seventies. Mon 19 About home. Bro. Gill preached at night, in the interest of the Sunday School and Juvenile Instructor. Tue 20 Took a team and went canvassing with Bro. Gill for the Instructor. Wed 21 Sowed some lettuce and radish seed. Snow again. Thu 22 Considerable rain. Went to Seymour’s. Eva quite sick.
Fri 23 More rain. At Seymour’s all day. Eva very sick. (80) Sat 24 Quite cold. Commenced smoking meat. Sun 25 at S.S. & meeting and conjoined meeting after noon. Quite cold. Went to Seymours. Eva quite sick. Mon 26 Vitrioling wheat. Byron came down. Went to Weymours. Tue 27 Went to take Byron home. Eva some better. I suffered with the cold. Boys commenced putting in wheat, but had to stop, wind so bad. Wed 28 Sowing wheat and oats, put in peas, turnips, etc. and cutting potato eyes. Extremely cold. Thu 29 A little more pleasant, put in some potatoes. Fri 30 Assorting potatoes. Nelson raking grain. Orson putting up fence. Went to Seymour’s. Eva much better. More pleasant.

May 1886

Sat 1 One inch snow. Went with Byron to Priesthood meeting. Quite cold, froze hard at night. Sun 2 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting afternoon. Mon 3 Work on pulley for shingle mill. Heard the marshals were coming. Shot Cleveland. summoned C. Brewer as witness before the court against Duffin for unlawful cohabitation. Considerable excitement. Marvin and Amanda here. Tue 4 The above transpired today (4th) instead of yesterday. Wed 5 Finished pulley, worked in garden. Thu 6 Fixed up fence at Spring Creek and went to Fast meeting. Fri 7 Setting out onions. Attended the anniversary of the Young Men and Young Ladies association. Had a good time. Dance at night. Sat 8 Went to Quarterly Conference at Paris. Apostle J. H. Smith preached in afternoon. Sun 9 Attended Conference. Apostle J. H. Smith and others preached. Had a good time, no excitement. Mon 10 Cutting potato eyes, and work in garden. Orson went to s. mill. Tue 11 Hauling manure. Helped Edgar some taking roof off his house. Wed 12 Went to fix shingle mill. Hauled 8 (eight) thousand shingles for A. Wilcox. Had bought mill of him. Thu 13 Quite cold. Hauled 842 (8.42?) thousand shingles for Wilcox.
Fri 14 Some warmer. Hauled 10 (ten) thousand (Shingles). Orson came home. Plowed in garden. Nelson work on pasture fence. Byron came, going to Montpelier. Sat 15 Went to shingle mill to haul shingles for Wilcox. Planted some peas in garden. Sun 16 At Sunday School and meeting. Attended Elders’ meeting afternoon. Seventies’ class at night. Mon 17 Orson and I planted potatoes. Also worked in garden. Nelson went with Marvin to drive cattle. Tue 18 Went to haul shingles. Quite warm. Orson worked on water ditch. (81) Wed 19 Went to haul shingles for Wilcox. Very warm. Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 20 Hauling shingles. Nelson came home. Fri 21 Hauled a load of shingle blocks for wood. Sat 22 Started to fix shingle mill but came back and helped the boys furrow out wheat and fix up fence. Sun 23 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Pigot preached, attended Conjoined meeting and took dinner at Lansing’s. Nelson worked on water ditch. Mon 24 Quite unwell. Not doing much. Tue 25 Felt some better. Done some work. Wrote to A. H. Cannon for Sunday School books. Marvin gave bonds for the office of sheriff. Orson very sick at night. Nelson on water ditch. Orson helped Seymour. Wed 26Sifted wheat and sent grist to mill. Orson better. Thu 27 Fixed pulley at shingle mill and hauled load of wood. Fri 28 Hauled manure. Very warm and dry. Sat 29 Watering garden, and went to see St. Charles boys and Paris boys play ball. St. Charles beat badly. Sun 30 At Sunday School and meeting. Mon 31 Worked garden. Boys helped Seymour.

June 1886

Tue 1 Worked garden. Set out cabbage plants. Nelson hauled manure. Orson watered lucern. Some rain. Wed 2 Started to Fast meeting (but none). Water lower lot. Thu 3 Started to Fast meeting, but none. water lower lot. Fri 4 Work some in garden. Nelson brought load of wood. Young folks gone school teacher’s surprise at night. Orson finished plowing. Sat 5 Went to Priesthood meeting. Byron came down. Sun 6 At Sunday School and meeting. Byron and Bro. Laker spoke. Seventies monthly meeting in afternoon. Mon 7 Hoeing in garden. Nelson went with Mervin to drive cattle. Tue 8 Hoeing in garden. Orson went to canyon to haul shingles. Wed 9 Went to Fish Haven after a horse. Hoeing in garden. Thu 10 Took black horse to Fish Haven. I was keeping for Seymour. Fri 11 Work in garden. Marvin and Nelson came home. Sat 12 Work in garden. St. Charles ball club went up and beat Garden City club. Rained nearly all day. Sun 13 At Sunday School and meeting. President Budge preached. Mon 14 Work some in garden. Had quite a frost, bit beans some. Boys went to mill shingles. Tue 15 Work some in shop. More rain. Rec’d a box of books and cards for Sunday School. Wed 16 Work some in shop and some in garden. Byron went to Liberty. Marvin, Edgar and Seymour started to Oxford as witnesses land matter for Lou Cook. Singing at night. Thu 17 Work some in garden and some in shop. (82) Fri 18 Went to Fish Haven with the black horse. Sat 19 fixing up ditches. Byron came back. Sun 20 At S>S> meeting & Seventies class. Marvin, Edgar and Seymour got back. Mon 21 Work in garden, found two ripe strawberries. Tue 22 Clearing out water ditch, etc., very warm. Chris and Lavette started to city and Temple. Wed 23 Hoeing potatoes. Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 24 Hoeing potatoes & watering lucern over Big Creek. Orson commenced watering wheat. Fri 25 Hoeing and watering. Nelson brought load of wood. Sat 26 Plowed out potatoes. Nelson finished watering wheat. Orson went after cows. Garden City boys came to play ball. Some rain. Sun 27 At Sunday School and meeting. Had the church decorated in memory of the day Joseph and Hyrum were killed. Had some exercises. Went to Conjoined meeting afternoon. Mon 28 Hoeing in garden, very warm. Nelson went to haul stone. Tue 29 Went to shingle mill. Hauled 10 (ten) thousand shingles. Wed 30 Went to shingle mill with L. D. Young’s wagon, broke his double-tree. Orson had a lame back.

July 1886

Thu 1 Fixing pasture fence and making wooden fork for shingle mill. Fri 2 Went to shingle mill, fixing pitman. Nelson came from hauling stone, and went to Soda Springs. Sat 3 Went to Priesthood meeting. Very warm. Sun 4 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ meeting afternoon. Mon 5 Hoeing in garden, boys went to Montpelier to their celebration and beat their club playing ball. Tue 6 Watering garden. Nelson cut lucern. Wed 7 Fixing hay rake and watering. Nelson & Orson not well. Thu 8 Fixing fence at Spring Creek, etc. Pulling weeds out of wheat. Very warm. Fri 9 Raking lucern and pulling mustard out of wheat. Sat 10 Attending the water in field and doing chores. Paris club came over here. St. Charles club beat. Sun 11 At Sunday School and meeting. Very warm. Mon 12 Fixed hay rake. Tue 13 Went to Paris to have hay claim recorded. Wed 14 Repairing and oiling harness. Sunday School singing at night. Thu 15Orson and I work on porch for T. A. Furness. Fri 16 We finished porch. Nelson hauling wood. Sat 17 At Society Conference. Had to do the singing with the Sunday School choir. Sun 18 At conference. Pres. C.D. Fjelsted here. Went with him to Bloominton in the interest of the seventies. Ordained 5 here at St. Charles. (83) Mon 19 Went with Pres. Fjelsted to Fishhaven. Ordained 2. Tue 20 Went to Gardent City. Ordained some there. Wed 21 Went to Meadowville, ordained 2 there. Thu 22 Went to Laketown, ordained four there came back to Garden City. Fri 23 Came home. Hoeing in garden. Had rain nearly every day. Sat 24 Attended celebration here. Had a good time. Father Osborn, John Forsgreen and wife were here. Sun 25 At Sunday School and meeting, also Conjoined meeting, and High Priest meeting. Byron and Matilda here. Mon 26 Hauling hay, fixing fence, etc. Tue 27 Finished hauling hay from Spring Creek. Was cut. Father Osborn went home. Wed 28 Hoeing in garden and helped Nelson to go to ranch to cut hay. Singing at night. Thu 29 Hoeing and watering garden. Had dinner at Marvin’s. Seymour and Orson plowing. Nice weather. Fri 30 Hoeing and water garden, but not feeling well. Orson finished plowing. Sat 31 Felt poorly. Did not do much. Orson went after lumber.

August 1886

Sun 1 At Sunday School and meeting. Sunday School teachers’ meeting in the morning and Seventies meeting afternoon. Mon 2 Helping the boys get started to put up hay. Byron came down. Tue 3 Work in garden and helped Medwin to cut hay. Wed 4 Watering garden. Took dinner at Adeline’s. Rag Bee. Thu 5 Repairing wagon wheel and went to Fast meeting. Fri 6 Finished wagon wheel. Very warm weather. Sat 7 Went to Priesthood meeting with Bro. H. S. Rich. Bro. Hart was there, also a Bro. Woolley from Grantsville. Sun 8 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Hart preached. Also Bro. Howells from Salt Lake. Mon 9 Hoeing garden and getting things to sent to hayfield by Lansing. Tue 10 Pulling weeds in lower lot. Orson came from hay field, quite sick. Wed 11 Got Bub Arnell to go in Orson’s place. Pull weeds. Went to Bro. Rich about cutting grain. Orson some better. Thu 12 Do not feel well. Looks like rain. Orson a little better. Fri 13 Felt some better, not doing much. Orson a little better. Sat 14 Went to Paris Conference. Apostle F. D. Richards and his son, F. S.Richards, was there. Had a splendid time. Stayed all night. Went to Priesthood Meeting. Good teaching. Sun 15 Stayed to Conference. Good time. Came home. Mon 16 Commenced harvesting, cut oats. Tue 17 Pulling weeds and wild oats. Edgar and Nelson went to finish stock hay. Wed 18 Doing chores, etc. Had a good rain. Marvin was (84) very sick at his farm at Preston by eating Bro. Passey's cheese. Some thought it was poisoned some way. Thu 19 Took grist to mill and repairing old mower. Nelson came home. Fri 20 Nelson cut timothy. Orson binding for Ole Anderson. Sat 21 Bro. Rich cut grain with binder. Orson & I shocking. I was quite sick at night. Nelson helped Lansing bind. Sun 22 Not very well but went to Sunday School and meeting. Took dinner with Chris and Lavette at Lansing’s. Chris is called on mission to the Southern States. The Sunday School voted to give Chris an Oxford Bible for great respect. Mon 23 Quite unwell. Nelson cut lucern and hay. Tue 24 Not able to do much. Nelson finished hay. Orson helped Chris haul hay. Marvin started to Logan. Wed 25 Boys hauling hay. I felt some better. Nice weather. Thu 26 Finished hauling hay. Fri 27 Finished cutting wheat. Sat 28 Hauled timothy and finished shocking wheat. Nelson cut lucern for Wilcox. Marvin got back from Logan. Sun 29 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Woolley preached. Mon 30 Doing chores, etc. Nelson cut lucern. Orson bind. Tue 31 Nelson went to shingle mill. Got it started.

September 1886

Wed 1 We had considerable rain. Thu 2 Had Primary Fair. Had children’s dance, then the older ones at night. Fri 2 Clearing off stockyard, etc. Sat 4 Went to Priesthood meeting. Nelson came home from shingle mill. Sun 5 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting afternoon. Cool. Mon 6 Had a big frost. Ice as thick as window glass. Putting away threshing machine to start. Tue 7 Done some more on machine. More rain. Wed 8 Done some more on machine. Sunday School teacher’s meeting at night. Thu 9 Pulling peas. Orson cut his hand again on the saw, but not so bad as before. Had to come home. Fri 10 Took machine out to my farm to set. Had a social meeting at night to bid C. M. Merkley (Chris) adue (good-bye). [as he was to soon start on his mission] and present him with a nice bible on behalf of the Sunday School. We had a splendid time. These words were printed in the book, “Presented to Elder C.A. Merkley by the St. Charles Sunday School”. Sat 11 Threshed my grain. Had 534 bushels. Sun 12 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies class meeting at night. (85) Mon 13 Made some feed boxes for the boys on machine. Nelson went to the ranch for his horses. Orson worked on Machine. Made double tree. Tue 14 Helping Nelson to go and get shingle logs. Chris started on his mission, the Sunday School donated $9.85 cts to Chris. He went off feeling well. Wed 15 Clearing up wheat on the threshing floor. Fixing up pulley in grainery. Helping to empty hull wheat etc. Had a very hard wind for 2 or 3 days, singing at night. Thu 16 Helping Seymour on his wagon, emptying grain. Fri 17 Fixing pulley, etc. Orson came home from machine, sick, very sick at night. Vomiting, purging. Sat 18 I drove on the machine as Orson was not able. Sun 19 Went to Sunday School. Dealt out more cards. Went to Montpelier in the afternoon. Mon 20 Went to the big show, and then came home. Tue 21 Helping on the thresher. Nelson hauled logs. Wed 22 Repaired the shaker to the machine. Nice weather. Thu 23 Threshed out seed peas and doing chores. Fri 24 Gathering seed beans, beets, etc. Had a political meeting at night. Pres. Budge and others were here. Nice weather for threshing, cool nights. Sat 25 Husking corn, quite cold in morning. Primary political meeting at night. Sun 26 At Sunday School and meeting. Conjoined meeting and Seventies class meeting at night. Mon 27 Orson and I digging potatoes. Nelson on the machine. Tue 28 Hauled Edgar’s wheat, finished husking corn. Byron came down, got 5,000 shingles. Wed 29 Put in wagon tongue for Marvin. Thu 30 Getting up potatoes, nice weather.

October 1886

Fri 1 Getting up potatoes, sprinkled rain in the morning. Just one month since we had any rain. Byron and Irene came down. Sat 2 Went to Priesthood meeting. Sun 3 Quarterly review of our Sunday School. Also meeting. Seventies meeting afternoon. Mon 4 Repairing knuckle for machine. Nice weather. Tue 5 Helping repair machine. Lansing and Marvin started to Logan. Rain and hail. Wed 6 Splitting wood. Teachers’ meeting and singing at night. Thu 7 Digging early rose potatoes. Went to meeting house, but no Fast meeting. Bull piston gave out, had to stop threshing. Telegraph for another piston. (86) Fri 8 dug Lavett's potatoes and wrote to News Office. Sat 9 Went to Special Priesthood with Byron. Sun 10 At S.S. School & meeting. Seventies Class Meeting at night. Some rain and snow on the mountain. Mon 11 Some rain and snow. Started machine again but had to stop for rain. Tue 12 Stocking wood in shanty. Boys finished threshing. Wed 13 Nelson and I digging beets, etc. Seymour and Orson started over to Bear River to work on water ditch. Edgar settling machine account. Singing for Sunday School at night. Thu 14 Not very well. Took dinner at Lavette’s. Lansing and Marvin got back from Logan. I split some wood. Fri 15 Writing News and Juvenile receipts, etc. Sat 16 Choreing around. Seymour came back from ditch. Marvin started yesterday to take a crazy woman to Blackfoot asylum. Sun 17 Went to Byron’s. Went to Sunday School and Seventies meeting. Came home after dark. Mon 18 Burying cabbage, etc. Got letter from Chris. Attended funeral of Mariah Peterson. Seymour, Medwin and Nelson went back to work on water ditch. Some rain and snow. Tue 19 Doing chores, etc. It kept me busy while all the boys were away. Judge Hays decided the TEST OATH against the Mormons WAS LEGAL. IT’S OPPRESSION.

(The following was taken from Byron H. Allred’s journal concerning the Edmond’s Bill:
“During the winter of 1882-83, the congress of the United States passed a bill known as the Edmond’s Bill which disfranchised all polygamists and placed the power of elections in the hands of three commissioners and making all births under this law of plurality of wives illegitimate after the 1st day of January 1883. By this unjust law, I was saved the trouble of voting and holding any office of trust under the Government of the United States.”
Also in B. H. Allred’s journal, dated Spring of 1885:
“In the spring of 1885, commenced one of the heaviest persecutions of the Latter-Day Saints I have ever up to this time experienced..... This persecution was carried on under the Edmunds’ Law against polygamy and unlawful cohabitation. Many of the faithful saints were imprisoned..... Several denied their wives and agreed to live within the law, becoming weak in the faith.”
“The persecution of the church continued to increase and many of the leading men were compelled to hide up .....”
“About the 19th of Oct. 1886, Judge Hays of Idaho, pronounced the test oath (which had been passed by the Idaho Legislature nearly two years ago) constitutional which was in substance that every person in Idaho Territory who voted at any election or held any office of trust or emolument should take and subscribe an oath that they were not a bigamist or polygamist and that they did not cohabit with more than one wife, neither believe in nor belong to any church which did believe in or practice either bigamy or polygamy. Several of the most active members of the church spent a great deal of their time traveling and writing for the church and to prevent all illegal proceedings against the people.
“On the evening of the 10th of Oct., our friends, Bros. Williams and Deuce accompanied by Pres. W. Budge and Charles Nibley arrived on their return to Logan. In order to continue their efforts in trying to use their influence by writing a letter to Judge Hays and sent Bro. Fred Turner with it and if possible get him to allow at least those not polygamists to vote and be eligible to office and if not, it was their intention to try and get a decision on it by the Supreme Court of the United States before the election which comes off the 2nd Monday in November, which will take almost night and days labor to accomplish.
“The result was that Judge Hays decided the act constitutional which disfranchised the whole population of the Mormon people in Idaho and all offices were made vacant on the 8th day of January 1887.
“On the 12 of January 1887, congress passed what is known as the Edmonds Tucker Anti-Polygamy Bill.... the bill was passed to a conference committee from each house and was revised before becoming a law .....I do not write it all, but suffice to say in the bill:
‘The corporation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was dissolved and the property to be handled by the supreme court of the Territory. Also a test oath was administered to the voters in substance that they were not Bigamists or Polygamists and would not aid or abet, council or direct, or advise others to break the law by committing these crimes of Bigamy or Polygamy.’
“Also women were disfranchised, but instead of the oath being put as the law directed, it was added to and one clause read as follows:
‘Where the decisions of the courts comes in conflict as regards these crimes with the instructions and laws of your organization which would you obey?’
“If they would obey the laws of God, they were rejected otherwise they were considered voters......”
More about this may be read in B. H. Allred’s journal.)

(A telegram came Feb 2, 1890, stating that the supreme court of the United States had decided that the TEST OATH gotten up in Idaho to deprive all Mormons from voting was legal, so it will rob all that believed in Mormonism from voting or holding any office. — Journal Entry from Henry Ballard of Logan, Feb 2, 1890. This entry was recorded over three years after this entry in William Moore Allred’s Journal. The Judge Hays was a local judge but now the Supreme Court of the United States has upheld that ruling.)

Wed 20 Taking care of garden vegetables. Thu 21 Went to grist mill and had a letter from Chris. Fri 22 Splitting wood, etc. Brought Marvin’s grist home. Sat 23 Doing chores, etc. Seymour and Orson came home. Sun 24 At Sunday School and meeting. Writing to Chris. Boys went back on ditch. Seventies class meeting, and meeting at night. Mon 25 Stacking wood and doing chores. Luanna’s birthday. Tue 26 Went over to Medwin’s, Orissa’s, Lavette’s, & Lansing’s. Wed 27 Picked up brush off the lucern, Nelson & Orson’s land. Thu 28 Went to Paris to take Marvin’s clothes as he had to go on train. Took a severe cold. Fri 29 Not very well. Fixing pig pen. Orson and some of the boys came home to get plow repaired. Sat 30 Not doing much. Bro. Buchanan, Agent for Juvenile, stopped with us. Did not go to singing practice, not well. Sun 31 Some snow on ground. At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Buchanan and Bro. Trunwell preached. Bro. Findley was at Sunday School. Had a good time. Richard Stock died.

November 1886

Mon 1 Went with Bro. Buchanan canvassing. Orson went back. Tue 2 Election day, but we were des-franchised on account of the test oath. Had no election. (87) Wed 3 Went to ranch to fix fence. Cattle had been in hay. Thu 4 Went to Fast Meeting. Not very well. Fri 5 Cold and disagreeable. Not doing much. Byron and Irene came to go to conference. Sat 6 Went to Conference at Paris. Stayed all night. Nice weather. Went to Priesthood meeting at night. Sun 7 At Conference. Had a good time, but none of the apostles here. Mon 8 Not doing much but chores. Mary Osborn going down to get married. Tue 9 About two inches snow, snowed more or less near all day. Wed 10 More snow. Quite cold. Let Lue Hale have my tithing wheat. Had singing at night. Boys got home from ditch. Thu 11 Fixing about the stables. Nelson hauled shingles, went back to mill to work. Fri 12 Thick fog, not doing much. Orson hauled shingles. Sat 13 Fixing cow manger. Sun 14 At Sunday School and meeting. Bros. Nibley and William Rich preached. Mon 15 More snow & very cold. Shelling some corn that I raised. Luanna (my oldest granddaughter) started to Logan Temple to get married to E. M. Pugmire. Edgar & Orson went to ranch to fix up fence and fix for feeding our stock. Nelson finished sawing shingles. Tue 16 More pleasant. Orson came back. Wed 17 Killed three hogs. Paid two to the store on my acct. Thu 18 Cutting up meat, etc. Conjoined meeting at night. More snow. Fri 19 Took dinner at Br. Ghun’s. Sat 20 Luanna got home from Logan. Byron came down. Sun 21 At Sunday School and meeting. Pres. Budge and Elders Nibley and Kimball were here. Attended Elders’ meeting in afternoon. Y. M. and Y. L. meeting at night. The Stake Superintendency present, had good teaching. Mon 22 More snow. Clearing out stable. Help Medwin fix shed. Tue 23 More snow. Settling up shingle mill account. Nelson went to Montpelier. Cold wind. Wed 24 Quite cold, not doing much. Sunday School singing at night. Nelson got home. Thu 25 More pleasant. Went to Orissa’s and Lavette’s, Medwin’s and Seymour’s. Nelson went with Marvin to drive cattle to Mr. Hunter. Robert Pugmire died. Fri 26 Quite pleasant. Attended R. Pugmire’s funeral. Presidents Budge and Hart preached. Large funeral. Bought a pair of blankets for my bed. Sat 27 Doing chores. Went to choir practice at night. Sun 28 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Driggs preached also. Seventies class meeting at night. (88) I had to speak on Word of Wisdom. Mon 29 Went to see Luanna, she is well fixed, got a good house well furnished. Orson’s birthday, he is helping gather stock. Tue 30 Very nice day. Killed two hogs, one weighted 408 pounds. I was very tired. Marvin and Nelson got back. Nelson went back again.

December 1886

Wed 1 Nice weather. Made gate for Lavette. Cut up and salted meat. Nelson got home found a cow that had been lost. [Daisy]. Thu 2 Went to Fast meeting. Marvin and Edgar drove cattle to ranch. Fri 3 Bro. Tarkinson preached at night, interest of Y. M. & Y. L. Sat 4 Went to Priesthood meeting with Marvin. Sister Davis came over. Sun 5 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting P.M. Also evening meeting. Mon 6 Stacking wood. Marvin killed a beef. Boys after lumber. Tue 7 Took Sister Davis home. Boys took lumber to Garden City. Wed 8 Took Sister Davis home. Very nice weather. Thu 9 Canvassing and collecting for the News. Fri 10 Some snow, but quite pleasant. Not very well. Sat 11 Splitting and stacking wood. Boys have slabs. Sun 12 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Hart preached. Making arrangements for Christmas tree. Nice weather. Mon 13 Making out my account with and writing to News. Tue 14 Selected prizes for Christmas tree. Cut up meat for Lavette and salting. Quite warm & muddy. Wed 15 Grinding sausage meet for Lavette. Singing practice at night. Byron came down to make arrangements about carrying the mail. Thu 16 Splitting and stacking wood. Conjoined meeting at night. Fri 17 Sent money to Loren for the News. Nelson haul lumber. Sat 18 Three or four inches snow. Put lock on door for Marvin. Nelson went to ranch to help with stock. Orson haul lumber to Garden City. He bought three Plymouth Rock roosters. Sun 19 At Sunday School and meeting and Elders’ meeting afternoon then evening meeting. Elisha Keech died about 6 o’clock P.M. Mon 20 Not doing much but chorus. Adeline’s birthday. Tue 21 Attended the funeral. Bro. Hart preached. Wed 22 A little more snow. Singing practice at night. Thu 23 Some more snow. Byron and Myra came down. Fri 24 My birthday. Was presented with a nice congress chair by eight of my granddaughters. More snow and wind.(89) Orson came from ranch. Sat 25 More pleasant fore noon but blowed hard after noon. Had Christmas tree. Had a good time Old mother Lena Osborn died at Montpelier. Orson came down from Ranch. Sun 26 At Sunday School but not feeling well. I came home. It still blowing and turning to rain. Wrote to Reddick. Nelson went to ranch to feed the stock. Mon 27 Quite warm. Orson and I work on clothes cupboard. Tue 28 Worked at Lansing’s on cupboard. Not able to do much. Quite warm. Sent order for News. Wed 29 Orson and I work at Lansing’s. Some more snow. Warm. Thu 30 Finished Sarah’s clothes cupboard. Byron came down and went back. Fri 31 Worked some on sleigh with Orson. Had children dance in afternoon and for older ones at night.

January 1887

Sat 1 Went to Priesthood meeting. Had a good time. Seymour commenced carrying the mail from here to Montpelier for Byron as he had taken it from Laketown to Montpelier. Very windy weather. Sun 2 At Sunday School and meeting, also Seventies and evening meeting. Mon 3 Settled up dance account. Tue 4 Quite cold, doing chores. Went to Priesthood meeting. Wed 5 Have taken quite a bad cold, and cough bad. Aunt Mary went to Montpelier. Thu 6 Went to Fast meeting. Quite unwell. Hard winds afternoon. Fri 7 Writing piece for theater. Quite cold. Nelson went for hay. Sat 8 Writing piece, and making out list of Sunday School names to draw prizes. Nelson and Orson brought home hay.Sun 9At Sunday School and meeting. Children drawed their prizes. Quite a cold day. Forty-five years since I was married first, and that was a cold day, too. Went to Seventies’ class meeting at night. Had a good lecture from L. B. Hunt and L. Laker. Mon 10 Not very well. Orson and I made wood box for Marvin. Nelson went with mail. Bro. Ackroid lectured at night. Tue 11 Made flower stand for Sarah and brought home our bench. Went with Adeline to Orissa’s and Lavett’s. Harvey & Myra going with our boys to writing school. Nelson with mail. (90) Wed 12 The worst snow storm and wind we have had this winter. Seymour went with mail and could scarcely get back. had to leave Sleigh & 1 horse. Thu 13 Bad storm again. Had meeting afternoon. Expected Apostle J. W. Taylor but he did not come. O. F. Whitney preached a great sermon, and C. W. Stainer in evening. Had a good time. Storm ceased at night. Nelson with mail. Fri 14 Quite warm and pleasant. Had dinner at Herman’s. Orson and I finished his sleigh. Heard Mother Lena Osborn was dead. Had a big dance at night. Sat 15 Went to Montpelier to funeral. Snow near all day. Sun 16 Went to meeting and visiting. Mon 17 Came home. Quite cold again. Father Osborn came with us. Went up to Bishop’s at night to settle tithing. Tue 18 Finished settling tithing. Went to Medwin’s to see his boy, born while I was at Montpelier. Wrote to News office. More snow at night. Wed 19 Making out Sunday School report and reading. Rain in the morning and then snow and wind. Nelson for hay. Thu 20 More snow and wind. Orson with mail. Nelson got back with hay. Heavy snow at night. Fri 21 Hay to unload. Seymour with mail. Bad roads. Sat 22 Ladies Conference here. I had to lead the singing. Sun 23 At the Conference. Pres. Budge and (Bro.) Hart over here to preach. Had a good time. More mild but some snow. Edgar came from ranch. Mon 24 Making out Sunday School report. More snow and wind. Herman sick. Tue 25 More pleasant. Waiting on Herman. He’s quite sick. Wed 26 Pretty cold but no wind. Herman better. Orson with mail. Thu 27 Very stormy again. Herman better. Seymour with mail. Fri 28 Worst storm yet. Seymour went with mail. Sat 29 Still stormy. Mervin took Orson’s team went with ___. Byron came with south mail. Blowed all night. Sun 30 At Sunday School and meeting. Wind blowed all day. Byron went home. Mon 31 More pleasant. Not much wind. Some snow. Seymour went with mail, said it blowed where he was.

February 1887

Tue 1 Snowing and blowing some. Herman better. Orson had a pain in his side. Wed 2 More pleasant. Had theater at night. Thu 3 I went to Medwin’s. Way hindered from going to fast meeting. (91) Fri 4 Quite pleasant. Wrote to News office. Sat 5 Went to Priesthood meeting. Father Osborn went home. Sun 6 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies meeting after noon. Went to evening meeting. Quite pleasant until near night, then blowed. Mon 7 Quite warm, some snow. Doing chores. Lorenzo Snow was released from prison. Tue 8 More snow, shoveling snow off the wood. Wed 9 Split wood. Sent money for license for the Seventies. More snow. Had Sunday School teachers’ meeting and singing at night. Thu 10 More snow and blowing. Conjoined meeting at night. Fri 11 Went to Young Ladies entertainment and party at night. Sat 12 Went to quarterly conference. More pleasant, but cold. Sun 13 Snowing and blowing. Did not go to conference, but went to Sunday School. Snow near all day but clear at night. Mon 14 Went to Valentine dance. Big turn out. Deep snow. Some had too much to drink at the dance. Tue 15 Quite pleasant. Bro. Weaver and his wife and Mother and Sister Holmes were here visiting. Wed 16 Visiting at Sister Holmes’. Snow near all day. Thu 17 Last night and this morning was the worst storm we have had this winter. Orson started with the mail, but had to come back. People had to shovel the snow out of their houses. Afternoon some turned out to break the road for the mail. In fact, January was the worst month I ever saw. Fri 18 Sawing and splitting wood. Orson went to ranch for hay. Sat 19 Doing chores. Orson got back with hay. Some more snow. Had singing practice at night. Very bad carrying the mail. Sun 20 At Sunday School and meeting and Elders’ meeting afternoon and Seventies’ class meeting at night. Mon 21 Splitting wood. Nelson went to haul hay for Chris’ stock. Lake frozen over. Tue 22 Very cold, but pretty clear. Writing some. Nelson haul hay for Chris. Wed 23 Visiting at Bro. Stewart’s. Doing chores. Coldest morning. Thu 24 Splitting wood, more pleasant. Writing piece for theater. Fri 25 Quite cold. Bad storm. Drifting bad all day. Sat 26 Splitting wood, quite pleasant. Bloomington folks had theater here last night. Sun 27 At Sunday School and meeting. Elders J. E. Hart and Alfred Osmond preached. Went to high priests’ meeting and evening meeting. Mon 28 Doing chores, etc. Moroni Davis and wife came. More pleasant.

March 1887

Tue 1 Beautiful day. Writing some. Boys went for hay. Wed 2 Writing pieces. Went to district meeting. Orson got back with hay. Edgar came with him. Thu 3 Went to Fast meeting. Some snow but warm. Edgar called on a mission to the North Western states, the first of my boys that was ever called. (92) Fri 4 Quite soft weather. Orson got back with hay. Sat 5 Went to Priesthood Mr. Hunter and his son, John, came to Marvins. more snow. Sun 6 At Sunday School and meeting. Edgar and Bro. Laker spoke. Mr. Hunter was there. Seventies’ meeting and class meeting at night. Mon 7 I went with the mail. Aunt Mary came home. Roads muddy, and wind blew at night. Tue 8 Snow going off fast. Doing chores. Wed 9 I went with the mail. Medwin and Orson killed four hogs for me. Roads bad. Thu 10 Cut up meat. Conjoined meeting at night. Fri 11 Doing chores. Had rheumatism in my knee. Sat 12 Went with the mail. Roads worse than ever. Sun 13 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Harle from Afton spoke. Mon 14 Shoveling snow off the wood, etc. Claudie’s baby not well. Tue 15 Doing chores and helping the boys with hay as we have to haul it from the ranch. Wed 16 Doing chores, etc. My knee quite lame. Had a theater at night to help Chris on his mission. Thu 17 Splitting wood. Rained some. Snow going off fast.
Fri 18Doing chores while Medwin and Nelson went for hay. Sat 19 Froze pretty hard. Around home. Sun 20 At Sunday School and meeting. Also Elders’ and Seventies’ meetings. Mon 21 Some snow and cold wind, which broke up lake. I was canvassing some for the Juvenile. Had a family gathering. Had all my children together once more before Edgar went on his mission. Had a good time. I think it is and perhaps will be the last time in this life. Tue 22 Canvassing with Bro. Gill for the Juvenile as he was here at our family gathering and spoke awhile. Nelson went with the mail and took Edgar to the train to go on his mission. Claudie very sick last night. Wed 23 Rheumatism pretty bad. Brother & Sister Hall here for dinner. Thu 24 Splitting wood. Went over to Medwin’s and called at Orissa’s, Lavette’s and Lansing’s. Fri 25 Splitting wood. Went up to hear the school spell. Had a good time. Some prizes given. Some snow. Sat 26 Doing chores and writing receipts. Cold wind, some snow Sun 27 At Sunday School and meeting. At High Priests’ meeting afternoon. Mon 28 Not doing much. My knee lame. Helped Marvin and Orson start off some cattle. A nice day. Tue 29 Cold wind. Raking in door yard and garden. Went out to the farm. (93) Wed 30 Raking trash spading ground, and planting garden seeds such as peas, lettuce, radishes, etc. Thu 31 sowed some more garden seeds and spliting wood while Orson sawed. Got a letter from Edgar at S.L (Salt Lake).

April 1887

Fri 1 Went to Lansing’s and Lavette’s. Adaline here. Sat 2 Very cold wind. Froze hard at night. Not out much. Sun 3 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ meeting afternoon, and Elders’ meeting at night. Mon 4 Repairing scrapper and work in garden. Tue 5 Planting peas, etc. in garden. Wed 6 Went over to Orissa’s. Vitrioling wheat to sow. Sacking potatoes. Thu 7 Went to Fast meeting, planting beets. Boys sowing wheat Fri 8 Planting peas, etc. Boys plowing. Heard from Edgar and Chris. Sat 9 Making door for a cabin on the hay ranch. Sun 10 At Sunday School and meeting. Some snow. Mon 11 Snow one-inch deep, and still snowing. Got letter from Edgar and one came from Chris. Tue 12 Writing to Edgar & News Office. Work in garden, etc. Boys went to ranch to make ditch on hay land. Planting onions. Quite cold. Wed 13 Work in garden. Thu 14 Planting garden for Lavette. Got Edgar’s blessing that he sent from the city. Fri 15 Cutting potatoes eyes and planting some. Quite poorly. Sat 16 Helped the boys haul in some hay. Cut up hog for Marvin. Sun 17 At Sunday School and meeting. Quite cool. Lansing got letter from Edgar. Went to Seventies’ class meeting afternoon. Mon 18 Made feed box. Sowed some wheat and copying Edgar’s blessing. Quite cold. Some rain. Tue 19 Sowing wheat. Boys plowing it in. Quite cold. I was very lame and tired. Wed 20 Sowing wheat, boys plowing. Rain and snow in the afternoon, and 17 or 18 years ago, the snow was two feet deep on the farm, and by sowing dirt on the snow, it went off sooner and I raised a good crop. Fri 22 Went with the mail and the boys finished plowing and sowing Sat 23 Went with mail. Quite cold. Boys harrowing and rubbing. Sun 24 At Sunday School and meeting. Joseph Shepherd and John Humphreys preached. Took dinner at Lansing’s and then went to Conjoined meeting and business meeting. Quite cold. Mon 25 Sowing oats, and fixing curtain for theater. Boys plowing. Quite cold. Tue 26 Sowing oats, fixing frame for curtain. More pleasant. Wed 27 Work on frame. Had the first pie plant pie (Rhubarb). Singing at night. (94) Thu 28 Putting up curtain and cutting potato eyes. Fri 29 Putting up scenery etc. Quite warm. Sat 30 Went with mail. Quite coldwind all day and some snow. Theater at night for Sunday School.

May 1887

Sun 1 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ meeting afternoon. Cold wind all day. Mon 2 Threshing timothy seed, etc. Tue 3 Went with mail. Quite warm, but rained some just after I got home. Lavette had another boy, born while Chris was away. Wed 4 Planting corn and potatoes on Edgar’s lot and some for Lavette. Thu 5 Went with mail. Boys planting potatoes in lower lot. Fri 6 Went with mail. Nelson took load potatoes to Montpelier. Sat 7 Went to Conference to Paris. Took some cold. Sun 8 Went to Conference. More pleasant. Had a good time. Mon 9 Went with mail. Very dry windy weather. Tue 10 Working water ditch at Spring Creek. Work in garden. Wed 11 Went with mail and it was so cold and windy I had to wear my overcoat and mittens and handkerchief over my mouth. Boys plowing for lucern. Sunday School singing at night. Thu 12 Still cold. Worked some for Lansing. Fri 13 Orson and I worked some for Lansing. Quite cold. Sat 14 I went with mail. Some warmer. Sun 15 At Sunday School and meeting. Elders J. C. and Ben Rich preached. Mon 16 Went to help Herman repair shingle mill Tue 17 Quite warm. Came home. Brought a load of shingle wood. Wed 18 Watering garden. Had some rain. Quite warm. Thu 19 Planting beans and commenced pasturing mail horses. Fri 20 Went with mail. Set out some cabbage plants. My knee quite lame. Sat 21 Went with mail. Garden City club played with St. Charles club and got beat. Some rain. Sun 22 At Sunday School and meeting. Presidents Budge and Osmond preached. Conjoined meeting afternoon. Took dinner at Lavette’s. Mon 23 Went with mail. Warm. Tue 24 Made three light sash for Lansing. Orson not well. Wed 25 Work in garden. Nelson hauling manure. Thu 26 Watering garden. W. Loce came. Orson not well. Fri 27 Went with mail. Quite warm. Sat 28 Went with mail. Got letter from Edgar. Sun 29 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ class meeting afternoon. Mon 30 Hoeing in garden and fixing fence at farm. Tue 31 Went with mail. Quite warm.

June 1887

Wed 1 Sowing lucern seed, etc. Thu 2 Went with mail. Quite cold. Had to wear my overcoat. No frost. Fri 3 Hoeing in the garden. heard Pres. Budge was arrested. Sat 4 Went with mail. Had a good rain, without much frost next morning. Sun 5 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ monthly meeting afternoon. Quite cold at night. Mon 6 Went with mail. Quite cool. Received Edgar’s likeness in Medwin’s letter. Tue 7 Went with mail. Quite warm. Pres. Budge back. Wed 8 Went with mail. Quite warm. Marvin started to Logan. Thu 9 Hoeing and watering garden. Boys watering wheat. Fri 10Work in garden. Sat 11 Attended Elders’ conference here. Medwin came down from the mill. Sun 12 Attended the Conference. Had a good time. Mon 13 Went with mail. Tue 14 Went with mail. Quite warm, then cold. Got a letter from Edgar. He is getting along well. Wed 15 Hoeing in garden. Attended Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 16 Went with the mail. Fri 17 Hoeing and watering garden. Sat 18 Went with mail. Nelson hauled 996 feet lumber for the Tabernacle as we had commenced building one at Paris. Sun 19 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ class meeting afternoon. Mon 20 Went with mail. Quite warm. Tue 21 Went with mail. Orson hauled lumber to Montpelier. Nelson in canyon. Wed 22 Went with mail. Very warm it was today. Nelson was in canyon. Thu 23 Went with mail. Sprinkle rain a little. Fri 24 Went with mail, but was almost sick with a cold. Sat 25 Not well. Got Marvin to go with mail. Boys came home from sawmill. Hard wind. Dust flying. Sun 26 Went to Sunday School Conference, had good teaching. Quite cool. Mon 27 Went with mail. Felt some better. Had some frost.
Tue 28 Went with mail. Byron and Seymour got back with Byron’s horse that had run off beyond Bridger. That was the reason I had to go with the mail so much. Wed 29 Watering garden, etc. Thu 30 Went to Spring Creek to turn water on hay land and hoeing in garden.

July 1887

Fri 1 Hoeing in garden. Some rain. Sat 2 Went to Paris to Priesthood meeting. Sun 3 At Sunday School and meeting. Had a mess of green peas. Seventies’ meeting afternoon. Mon 4 Went with mail. Boys went to Montpelier to play ball (and to the celebration), but got beat. Tue 5 Went with mail. Very warm. Wed 6 Hoeing in garden. Had singing practice at night. (96) Thu 7 went with mail. got a letter from Edgar. Fri 8 went with mail. Very warm. Marvin had a valuable horse. he rode him to the lake to wash him some, and he got frightened and run into the outlet, where the water was deep, and he would not try to swim, so Marvin got off to go ashore, thought perhaps the horse would then swim ashore, but he pawed Marvin under his feet and came near drowning him, and then drowned himself before he could be got out. Sat 9 Attended Primary. Young Ladies and Relief Society Conference. Sun 10 At conference. Had a good time. Mon 11 Went with mail. Had some rain, but not go much farther north. Tue 12 Went with mail. Wed 13 Went with mail. Had a hard rain after I got home. Seymour got Rudolph to work in my place as it was easier for me to carry mail. Thu 14 Hoeing in garden some, but rather wet. Sent money to Laron. Fri 15 Hoeing in garden. Orissa got letter from Edgar. Sat 16 Went with mail. More rain. Sun 17 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ class meeting afternoon. Mon 18 Went with mail. More rain. Nelson hauled lumber. Tue 19 Hoeing potatoes in lower lot. Wed 20 Hoeing potatoes. Orson went with mail in Seymour’s place. Singing at night. Nelson cut wheat and wild oats. Thu 21 Hoeing potatoes. Nelson hauled lumber to Mr. Web. Fri 22 Hoeing and watering garden. Sat 23 In bed part of the time. Had worked too hard. Heard Pres. Taylor was very sick. Sun 24 At Sunday School and meeting. Conjoined meeting afternoon. Mon 25 Went with mail. Expected to have a Celebration, but it was put off on account of Pres. Taylor’s sickness. Tue 26 Went with mail. Nelson cut hay at Spring Creek. Wed 27 Watering garden. Had singing practice at night. Thu 28 Hoeing in garden and helping the boys stack hay. Fri 29 Stacking hay and attended the Funeral of Pres. Taylor, as it was held in every ward. I was called on to speak. Sat 30 Helping the boys to get ready to go to ranch to cut hay Sun 31 At Sunday School and meeting.
August 1887

Mon 1Went with mail in Seymour’s place. Nelson went to ranch to cut hay. Tue 2 Watering potatoes on Edgar’s lot. Medwin and (97) Orson went to ranch to put up hay. Got a letter from Edgar and one from Chris. They were doing well. Wed 3 Watering potatoes. Thu 4 Went with the mail in Seymour’s place. Fri 5 Watering lucern. Sat 6 Went with the mail in Seymour’s place. Got another letter from Edgar. Sun 7 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ monthly meeting afternoon Mon 8 Went with mail.
Tue 9 Went with mail. Seymour sick. Wed 10 Chopping wood and helping Lavette, etc. Thu 11 Went with the mail while Seymour was hunting J. C. Rich’s horse. My brother, Reddick, and his wife, Lucy, came from San Pete on a visit. Fri 12 Visiting with my brother. Went to the outlet. Sat 13 Went with the mail. Quarterly Conference commenced at Paris. Had a big hail storm just this side of Paris, none here. Sun 14 Went to Conference with my brother, Reddick. Mon 15 Doing chores and visiting with my brother, Reddick. Tue 16 Visiting at Luanna’s with Reddick, etc. Boys came back from haying. Grain getting ripe fast. Wed 17 Visiting at Marvin’s. Boys helped William bind, then he cut grain on Edgar’s lot. Singing at night. Thu 18 Visiting at Lansing’s with Reddick. Boys went to put up hay for Chris. Wrote a letter to Edgar; after it was mailed, got one from him. Fri 19 Visiting (with others) part of the time at Adeline’s. Sat 20 Chopping wood for myself and Lavette. Reddick and Lucy went to Paris to visit some there. Wrote to Edgar. Sun 21 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ class meeting afternoon.
Mon 22 Went with Reddick to Paris to attend the reunion of the Rich family. Had a good time in a grove. Rain at night. Tue 23 Started to Soda (Springs) for an out. Went to George- town. Stayed at Lolan Robison’s. Saw many friends. Wed 24 Some rain, but went to Soda (Springs). William cut our grain. As the boys had helped him, so I did not help. Thu 25 Looking around at the sights and drank soda water. There was Byron, Irene, Adaline, Marvin, Amanda W. Lee, and Laverne, Aunt Mary and I, so we had a jolly round. Came back to Georgetown and stayed at Wilford Clark’s. Fri 26 Came home, found all tolerable well. Got Edgar’s picture. Sat 27 Reddick and Lucy started home. I went with them to Byron’s. Had a good visit. Sun 28 Attended Sunday School and meeting in Garden City. Bid my brother good-bye and came home. Sister Bird of Paris died. Mon 29 Went to Sister Bird’s funeral. Tue 30 Some rain, pulling peas, etc. Sawed some wood for Lavette. Wed 31 Some rain, pulling weeds. Got letter from Edgar, doing well. Marvin and Orson hunting cattle over the river. Nelson hauled hay. (98)

September 1887

Thu 1 Big frost. Sawed wood for Lavette and raked some lucerne. Nelson hauled hay for Lavett. Went to Fast Meeting but there was no meeting. Fri 2 Raking and bunching lucern. Marshalls caught some one. Name rubed out. Sat 3 Went to Priesthood meeting. Marshals around. Sun 4 At Sunday School and meeting. Seventies’ meeting afternoon. Mon 5 Went with mail, while Seymour helped boys haul lucern.
Tue 6 Went with mail. Boys hauling hay. Saw a marshal. Wed 7 Cutting up corn. Went to the Primary fair. Singing at night. Thu 8 Threshing peas. Attended funeral of Swan Sanderson’s child. Fri 9 Pulling beans and gathering garden seeds. Sat 10 Fitting up the threshing machine to thresh the grain. Sun 11 At Sunday School and meeting. Mon 12 Threshing my grain. Had a small crop. Helped Lansing some on his. Tue 13 Cleaning up the threshing floor, etc. Marvin got a letter from Edgar. Wed 14 Went with mail. Had Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 15 Chopping wood, etc. Thresher broke, had to stop threshing. Fri 16 Went with the mail, as Seymour had boils. Sat 17 Went with mail. Got letter from Edgar. Still doing well. Sun 18 At Sunday School and meeting. Also Seventies’ class in afternoon. Mon 19 Went with mail again. Tue 20 Threshing beans. Got a letter from Reddick, he had lost another grandchild. Wrote a letter to Reddick and one to Chris. Wed 21 Digging potatoes, etc. Singing at night. Had a big turnout. Thu 22 Repairing old wagon. Orson came home with another broken wagon. Fri 23 Went with mail. Got the boxing for the machine. Sat 24 Chopping wood, etc. Machine broke again (horse power), and Nelson and some others started for another. Some rain. Sun 25 At Sunday School and meeting. Went to Conjoined meeting afternoon. Mon 26 Went with the mail. Tue 27 Seymour went with the mail and came near getting killed with a horse. Wed 28 Fixing wagon and picking up potatoes. Seymour better. Singing at night. Thu 29 Went with mail. Seymour still getting better. Fri 30 Went with mail.

October 1887

Sat 1 Went with mail. Seymour still gaining. Sun 2 At Sunday School and meeting, also Seventies’ monthly meeting. Mon 3 Started to Conference with Marvin and Amanda. Tue 4 Got to Mendon, Cache Valley. I was quite sick at night. Left the team there. Wed 5 Went on train to City (Salt Lake City) Stopped at Laron Pratt’s. Thu 6 Attended the Conference. Jacob Gates, John H. Smith, and Milo Andrus were the speakers in the forenoon. Afternoon Bro. Gowens of Tooele, A. H. Cannon and Elias Morris and F. A. Hammond, and Young Men’s in the evening. Fri 7 L. W. Taylor spoke forenoon. Afternoon William Budge, William Bromley and Angus Cannon. Sunday School in evening. Sat 8 Apostle Erastus Snow on the redemption of the dead. Afternoon O. F. Whitney read the Epistle of the twelve Apostles and that took all the time. Went to Priesthood meeting at night. Sun 9 John T. Kane, L. Snow. Afternoon President Woodruff came on the stand, made a bow, people cheered him, he spoke awhile and then disappeared. Then J. Nicholson and O. F. Whitney spoke in the afternoon. (99) Conference closed and we had a splendid time, then I took train to Kaysville, stayed at Joseph Egbert’s, my brother-in-law (Caroline), then on. Mon 10 Took train when Marvin came along, and went to Mendon. Tue 11 Started for home. Got up into Logan canion. Wed 12 Got home about 9 o'clock at night. Had a good time. Thu 13 Digging and burying beets and turnips. Fri 14 Went with mail while Seymour went with Orson after his mare.
Sat 15 Got a letter from Edgar. Digging carrots. Quite cold wind. Singing at night. Sun 16 Went Sunday School and Mrs. Brewer’s funeral, went Seventies’ class meeting afternoon and then evening meeting. Mon 17 Fixing wagon wheel, quite cold, some snow. Tue 18 Went with mail for Seymour. He helped Medwin. Wed 19 Went with mail. Quite cold. The wind and dust awful. Thu 20 Wrote to Laron. Orson quite sick all day. Fri 21 Husking corn some. Orson got worse. Byron came down and stayed with him all night. Wind and dust bad. Sat 22 Orson better. Some wind and dust, as it was dry. Sun 23 At Sunday School and meeting. Orson worse again. Mon 24 Fixing up fence. Orson better. Bro. Hancy here. Quite cool. Tue 25 Went to Paris as witness for Byron, as someone had accused him of stealing lumber, but no trial. Quite cold and blustery and some snow. Wed 26 Quite cold. Not much done. Had Sunday School singing practice at night. Thu 27 Husking corn. Fri 28 Went with mail for Seymour as Claudie was sick. Sat 29 Went to Paris again for Byron, but had no trial. Sun 30 At Sunday School and meeting. Bro. Findley preached. Mon 31 Finished husking corn. Quite nice weather. Orson went home with Byron ‘till he got better.

November 1887

Tue 1 Helping Medwin shingle his house. Attended the reorganization of the Young Men’s Association. Wed 2 Finished shingling Medwin’s house, but took a severe cold by sitting on the damp shingles. Attend Sunday School Teachers’ meeting also singing practice. Orson came home. Thu 3 Attended Fast meeting, but not well. Orson gaining slowly. Fri 4 Beautiful weather, but I was very poorly. Sat 5 Went to Priesthood meeting. Pres. Budge was there as he had been permitted to return home from court. Sun 6 At Sunday School and meeting. Also Seventies monthly meeting afternoon. Mon 7 Helped the boys haul hay into barn, etc. Looks like storm. Tue 8 Fixing Lavette’s door. Wed 9 Doing chores. A committee met at my house to arrange for a Sunday School concert. Then singing. Thu 10 Sacking potatoes for market. Fri 11 Doing chores, etc. Sat 12 Not well. Wrote to Edgar. Took dinner at Sister Ghun’s. Sun 13 At Sunday School and meeting and evening meeting. Sister Pugmire died about dark, a sad blow to the family.
Mon 14 Went to Paris on some business. Clear and cold. Dusty. Tue 15 Attended Sister Pugmire’s funeral. Large procession. Wed 16 Not doing much as I wasn’t well. Singing at night. Thu 17 Splitting wood and other chores. Went to Medwin’s.

Note: Another journal??? Died - 8 June 1901.

Please send me your family histories Don@AllredRoster.com
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Family History Index

Copyright © 1998-2002 Donald Clemont Allred. All Rights Reserved.1 William Moore Allred was born on 24 December 1819 at Bedford County, Tennessee.1 He married Orissa Angela Bates on 9 January 1842 at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois.1 William was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census at The District No 21, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. 920 920 William M. Allred 31 male TN; Orissa 26 female NY; William 8 male IL attending school; Mary 5 female IL attending school; Byron 3 male IA; Marvin 1 male IA; Mary Corbage 14 female England attending school.2 He married Martha Jane Martindale at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, on 4 July 1856.1,3 He witnessed an unknown person 's death at Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, on 18 November 1860.1,3 He married Mary Eleanor Osborn at Idaho on 28 May 1878.1,3,4 William Moore Allred died on 8 June 1901 at Fairview, Lincoln County, Wyoming, at age 81.1,3

Family 1

Orissa Angela Bates b. 17 Aug 1823, d. 29 Jan 1878
Children

Family 2

Martha Jane Martindale b. 1 Feb 1837, d. 18 Nov 1860
Children

Family 3

Mary Eleanor Osborn b. 26 Aug 1831, d. 2 Aug 1906

Citations

  1. [S738] Allred Family Roster, online http://www.allredroster.com/scripts/foxweb.exe/allred/eni2
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Byron Allred Age: 3 Estimated birth year: abt 1847 Birth place: Iowa Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 21, Pottawattamie, Iowa Page: 122 Roll: M432_188.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ron Carter Family.

Orissa Angela Bates1

F, b. 17 August 1823, d. 29 January 1878
     Orissa Angela Bates was born on 17 August 1823 at Henderson, Jefferson County, New York.1 She married William Moore Allred on 9 January 1842 at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois.1 As of 9 January 1842,her married name was Allred.1 Orissa, William, Mary, Byron and Marvin was listed as a household member living with William Moore Allred on the 1850 Census at The District No 21, Pottawattamie County, Iowa; 920 920 William M. Allred 31 male TN; Orissa 26 female NY; William 8 male IL attending school; Mary 5 female IL attending school; Byron 3 male IA; Marvin 1 male IA; Mary Corbage 14 female England attending school.2 Orissa Angela Bates died on 29 January 1878 at St. Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho, at age 54.1,3

Family

William Moore Allred b. 24 Dec 1819, d. 8 Jun 1901
Children

Citations

  1. [S738] Allred Family Roster, online http://www.allredroster.com/scripts/foxweb.exe/allred/eni2
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Byron Allred Age: 3 Estimated birth year: abt 1847 Birth place: Iowa Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 21, Pottawattamie, Iowa Page: 122 Roll: M432_188.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.

William Lansing Allred1

M, b. 18 October 1842, d. 28 January 1915
FatherWilliam Moore Allred1 b. 24 Dec 1819, d. 8 Jun 1901
MotherOrissa Angela Bates1 b. 17 Aug 1823, d. 29 Jan 1878
     William Lansing Allred was born on 18 October 1842 at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois.1 Orissa, William, Mary, Byron and Marvin was listed as a household member living with William Moore Allred on the 1850 Census at The District No 21, Pottawattamie County, Iowa; 920 920 William M. Allred 31 male TN; Orissa 26 female NY; William 8 male IL attending school; Mary 5 female IL attending school; Byron 3 male IA; Marvin 1 male IA; Mary Corbage 14 female England attending school.2 William Lansing Allred died on 28 January 1915 at St. Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho, at age 72.1,3

Citations

  1. [S738] Allred Family Roster, online http://www.allredroster.com/scripts/foxweb.exe/allred/eni2
  2. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Byron Allred Age: 3 Estimated birth year: abt 1847 Birth place: Iowa Gender: Male Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 21, Pottawattamie, Iowa Page: 122 Roll: M432_188.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.