Sarah Walker1

F, b. 6 August 1739, d. 19 January 1792
FatherRev. Timothy Walker2 b. 27 Jul 1705, d. 1 Sep 1782
MotherSarah Burbeen2 b. 17 Jun 1701, d. 19 Feb 1778
     Rolfe, Benjamin (1710 Newbury - 1771 Concord NH) Rumford HR 1740; HarC 1727, selectman 1732-49, 66-68, district clerk 1732-47, 66, 68; JP. M Sarah Walker (1739/40-1792) in 1769, 1 chj: land speculator, legal advisorl. One slave. As the clerk of the proprieters of Penacook NH he was regarded for his sound judgment and prudence. No committees. He intended marriage in 1736 to Hepzibah Hazen, butr is unclear whether it ever took place. Sarah married 2nd Benjamin Thompson, later Count Rumford, in 1771. Sibley 8:258-63; 1856 Concord b 182-7, 555-6.3 Sarah Walker was born on 6 August 1739 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; daughter of Rev Timothy and Sarah (Burbeen) Walker.1 She was born on 6 August 1739 at Rumford, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.4 As of circa 1769,her married name was Rolfe.1 She married Benjamin Rolfe, son of Henry Rolfe and Hannah Toppan, circa 1769 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.1 She witnessed Benjamin Rolfe's death at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 21 December 1771. Then called Rumford
"Seven months later, on the 21sgt of December, [Benjamin Rolfe] died in the sixty-second year of his age. His prominent efficiency in the settlement, as a plantation, township, district, parish, or non-corporate organization, hs been noticed on the foregoing pages. The father, Henry Rolfe, having been a leading spirit in planting Penacook and incorporating Rumford,had returned ere long to his Massachusetts home, leaving the son, a young man of liberal education and of good capacity for affairs, to identify himelf with a people whose interests he was so faithfully to serve. This son enjoyed fromthe first the confidence of his fellow citizens, and retaind it to the last. He held all the important offices, frequently two or more at a time. He longest filled the position of town clerk, to which he was, upon declining further service, succeeeded in 1769 by Timothy Walker Jr. Though nota lawyer, Benjamin Rolfe was a capable legal advisor, and satisfactorly discharged the various duties of a civil majistrate. He also had military experience, particularly inthe first French and Indian War, with the rank of Colonel. By inheritance, and by his own industry and prudent management, he aquired a large property in lands, and, at his death, was accounted the richest man in Concord. Colonel Rolfe remained single til his sixtieth year, when he married Sarah WAlker, the minister's eldest daughter, thirty years younger than himself. The son Paul, born of this brief union, inherited his father's estate, inventoried at four thousand and eighty-two pounds lawful money. Before his marriage Colonel Rolfe "lived in a one-story house' at the Eleven Lots, but after that event he built and occupied the larger and more commodious dweling which still stands, as a venerable historic relic, and as part of an asylum sacred to the noble charity of relieving orphanage in Concord.".5,6 As of circa November 1772,her married name was Thompson.5 Sarah Walker married Sir Benjamin Thompson circa November 1772 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.5 Sarah Walker married an unknown person in November 1772 at New Hampshire.4 As of between 1780 and 1792, Sarah Walker was also known as Lady Rumford or 1st Countess Rumford.5 Sarah died on 19 January 1792 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, at age 52.1

Family 1

Benjamin Rolfe b. 8 Jul 1710, d. 21 Dec 1771
Child

Family 2

Sir Benjamin Thompson b. 26 Mar 1753, d. 21 Aug 1814
Children

Citations

  1. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Walker Descendants.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S156] MA Legislators 1691-1780, online http://books.google.com
  4. [S817] Pane-Joyce Genealogy, online http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/report/rr08/…
  5. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  6. [S162] Concord History 1900, online books.google.com.

Paul Rolfe1

M, b. 4 August 1770, d. 18 July 1819
FatherBenjamin Rolfe1 b. 8 Jul 1710, d. 21 Dec 1771
MotherSarah Walker1 b. 6 Aug 1739, d. 19 Jan 1792
     Paul Rolfe Colonel NH Militia.1 He was born on 4 August 1770 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; then called Rumford.1 He was graduated in 1792 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts; Graeduated in 1792 from Harvard College.1 He married Elizabeth Kirkwood on 6 October 1792 at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.2 As of 1800, Paul Rolfe was also known as Paul Roffe.3 Paul was listed as the head of a family on the 1800 Census at Image 4 of 5, Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Then Rockingham County
1800 United States Federal Census
about Paul Roffe
Name:
Paul Roffe

Township:
Concord

County:
Rockingham

State:
New Hampshire

Free White Males Under 10:
1

Free White Males 26 to 44:
1

Free White Females Under 10 :
1

Free White Females 26 to 44 :
1

Number of All Other Free Persons:
2

Number of Household Members Under 16 :
2

Number of Household Members Over 25 :
2

Number of Household Members:


.4 He died on 18 July 1819 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, at age 48.1

Family

Elizabeth Kirkwood b. c 1770, d. 15 Jan 1837

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Walker Descendants.
  3. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Paul Roffe
    Name:
    Paul Roffe

    Township:
    Concord

    County:
    Rockingham

    State:
    New Hampshire

    Free White Males Under 10:
    1

    Free White Males 26 to 44:
    1

    Free White Females Under 10 :
    1

    Free White Females 26 to 44 :
    1

    Number of All Other Free Persons:
    2

    Number of Household Members Under 16 :
    2

    Number of Household Members Over 25 :
    2

    Number of Household Members:.


  4. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Paul Roffe
    Name:
    Paul Roffe

    Township:
    Concord

    County:
    Rockingham

    State:
    New Hampshire

    Free White Males Under 10:
    1

    Free White Males 26 to 44:
    1

    Free White Females Under 10 :
    1

    Free White Females 26 to 44 :
    1

    Number of All Other Free Persons:
    2

    Number of Household Members Under 16 :
    2

    Number of Household Members Over 25 :
    2

    Number of Household Members:.

Sir Benjamin Thompson1

M, b. 26 March 1753, d. 21 August 1814
     Sir Benjamin Thompson is included in the biography of Benjamin Rolfe and Sarah Walker; Rolfe, Benjamin (1710 Newbury - 1771 Concord NH) Rumford HR 1740; HarC 1727, selectman 1732-49, 66-68, district clerk 1732-47, 66, 68; JP. M Sarah Walker (1739/40-1792) in 1769, 1 chj: land speculator, legal advisorl. One slave. As the clerk of the proprieters of Penacook NH he was regarded for his sound judgment and prudence. No committees. He intended marriage in 1736 to Hepzibah Hazen, butr is unclear whether it ever took place. Sarah married 2nd Benjamin Thompson, later Count Rumford, in 1771. Sibley 8:258-63; 1856 Concord b 182-7, 555-6.2 Sir Benjamin Thompson was also known as Benjamin Thompson Count Rumford.3 Sir Benjamin Thompson was also known as Count Rumford.1 He was born on 26 March 1753 at Woburn, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.1 He married Sarah Walker, daughter of Rev. Timothy Walker and Sarah Burbeen, circa November 1772 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.1 With the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Benjamin Thompson remained loyal to the crown and went to England. He later returned to America where he engaged in combat against the Colonial Troops. Sarah remained in New Hampshire and supported the fight for independence. For his service Benjamin was knighted and took the title of 'Count Rumford.' Sarah was then known as "Lady Rumford."1 He witnessed Sarah Walker's death at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 19 January 1792.4 Sir Benjamin Thompson married Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze on 24 October 1805 at Paris, France.5 Sir Benjamin Thompson died on 21 August 1814 at Villa Auteuil, Paris, France, at age 61.1 He Fred Rolfe - With the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Benjamin Thompson remaind loyal to the crown and went to England,later returning to America where he engaged in combat against the Colonists. Sarah did not go to England with her husband, but instead supported the Revolutioary Cause. For his service, Benjamin was knighted and took the title of 'Count Rumford.' Sarah,his wife then known as Lady Rumford, d 1/10/1792 at Rumford. They had one daughter, Sarah Thompson b 10/18/1774 in the Rolfe house at Rumford, later known as Countess of Rumford. She spent some time abroad with her father, but returned to Rumford where she dedicated her life and fortune to charitable work, dying there in 1852.6

Family 1

Sarah Walker b. 6 Aug 1739, d. 19 Jan 1792
Children

Family 2

Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze b. 20 Jan 1758, d. 10 Feb 1836

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S156] MA Legislators 1691-1780, online http://books.google.com
  3. [S817] Pane-Joyce Genealogy, online http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/report/rr08/…
  4. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Walker Descendants.
  5. [S128] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org
  6. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.

Sarah Thompson1

F, b. 18 October 1774, d. 2 December 1852
FatherSir Benjamin Thompson1 b. 26 Mar 1753, d. 21 Aug 1814
MotherSarah Walker1 b. 6 Aug 1739, d. 19 Jan 1792
     Sarah Thompson was also known as Countess of Rumford or 2nd Countess Rumford.2 She was born on 18 October 1774 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.1 She died on 2 December 1852 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, at age 78.1

Citations

  1. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Walker Descendants.
  2. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php

Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze1

F, b. 20 January 1758, d. 10 February 1836
     Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze was also known as Marie Anne Pierette.2 She was born on 20 January 1758 at Montbrison, Loire, France.1 As of 16 December 1771,her married name was Lavoisier.1 She married Antoine Lavoisier on 16 December 1771 at France.1 As of 24 October 1805,her married name was Thompson.1 Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze married Sir Benjamin Thompson on 24 October 1805 at Paris, France.1 Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze died on 10 February 1836 at Paris, France, at age 78.1

Family 1

Antoine Lavoisier b. 26 Aug 1743, d. 8 May 1794

Family 2

Sir Benjamin Thompson b. 26 Mar 1753, d. 21 Aug 1814

Citations

  1. [S128] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org
  2. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php

Antoine Lavoisier1

M, b. 26 August 1743, d. 8 May 1794
     Antoine Lavoisier was born on 26 August 1743 at Paris, France.1 He married Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze on 16 December 1771 at France.1 Antoine Lavoisier died on 8 May 1794 at Paris, France, at age 50.1

Family

Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze b. 20 Jan 1758, d. 10 Feb 1836

Citations

  1. [S128] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org

William Rolfe1

M, b. 5 March 1747/48, d. 25 December 1835
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     William Rolfe was born on 5 March 1747/48 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 He married Levina Harriman at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts, on 15 May 1770.1 As of 1790, William Rolfe was also known as William Ralph.2 He was census 1790 in September 1790 at Canterbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire; then Rockingham county William Ralph, 1 male 16+, 2 males 1-15, 7 females.3 He died on 25 December 1835 at Chelsea, Orange County, Vermont, at age 87.4

Family

Levina Harriman b. 29 Jan 1749, d. Nov 1831
Children

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com.
  3. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: William Ralph Township: Canterbury County: Rockingham State: New Hampshire.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Montgomery/ Staley Family Tree.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, One World TRee.
  6. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Montgomery / Staley Family Tree.

Judith Rolfe1

F, b. 25 November 1750, d. 28 June 1790
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Judith Rolfe was born on 25 November 1749 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 She was born on 25 November 1750 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.2 As of 26 November 1780,her married name was Knapp.3 She married Nathaniel Knapp at Essex County, Massachusetts, on 26 November 1780.3 Judith died on 28 June 1790 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 39.3

Family

Nathaniel Knapp b. 30 Mar 1736, d. 6 Jul 1816

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S137] New England Historical and Genealogical Register, online http://books.google.com, Volume 3 (1849) -- p. 152, "Some Materials Towards a Genelogy of the Family by the Name of Rolfe."
  3. [S129] Ould Newbury, online http://books.google.com

Nathaniel Knapp1

M, b. 30 March 1736, d. 6 July 1816
     Nathaniel Knapp was born on 30 March 1736 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 He married Mary Mirick on 14 January 1757 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 He witnessed Mary Knapp's death at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, on 29 May 1779.1 He married Judith Rolfe at Essex County, Massachusetts, on 26 November 1780.1 He witnessed Judith Rolfe's death at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, on 28 June 1790.1 Nathaniel Knapp married Patty Lurvey between 16 February 1794 and 1795 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Nathaniel Knapp died on 6 July 1816 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 80; buried on the southerly side of the Old Hill Burying ground, near Pond Street.1

Family 1

Mary Mirick b. c 1737, d. 29 May 1779

Family 2

Judith Rolfe b. 25 Nov 1750, d. 28 Jun 1790

Family 3

Patty Lurvey b. c 1765, d. 19 Jun 1847

Citations

  1. [S129] Ould Newbury, online http://books.google.com

Mary Mirick1

F, b. circa 1737, d. 29 May 1779
     Mary Mirick was born circa 1737 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 As of 14 January 1757,her married name was Knapp.1 She married Nathaniel Knapp on 14 January 1757 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Mary died on 29 May 1779 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1

Family

Nathaniel Knapp b. 30 Mar 1736, d. 6 Jul 1816

Citations

  1. [S129] Ould Newbury, online http://books.google.com

Patty Lurvey1

F, b. circa 1765, d. 19 June 1847
     Patty Lurvey was born circa 1765 at Essex County, Massachusetts.1 As of between 16 February 1794 and 1795,her married name was Knapp.1 She married Nathaniel Knapp between 16 February 1794 and 1795 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Patty Lurvey died on 19 June 1847 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1

Family

Nathaniel Knapp b. 30 Mar 1736, d. 6 Jul 1816

Citations

  1. [S129] Ould Newbury, online http://books.google.com

Benjamin Rolfe1

M, b. 31 May 1752, d. 1 October 1828
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Benjamin Rolfe and Nathaniel Ralph Junr. Many anecdotes are told of Benjamin Rolfe. He owned land in common with his brother Nathaniel, and they lived together as bachelors for a number of years. Occasionally, when Banjamin came to Main Street, he would be rallied by his friends about his bachelors state, and asked how he and his brother got along. "Very well," he replied, "only we have but one pair of trousers between us." "Well, how do you manage with one pair?" "Why we agree the one who gets up first shall wear them through the day." Mr. Rolfe was one of the early settlers of Rumford, in Maine, where in common with others he endured great privations and hardships. Attempting to cross the Androscoggin River one night with his horse in a ferry-boat -- hjis head being somewhat flighty-- he was carried downstream about a mile, where there were rapids, and a first fall of fifteen feet, and a second fall of ninety-four feet. Just at the head of the first fall was a large rock, standing out of the water, against which the boat struck, and he stepped out on the rock. The horse was thrown out, and went over the first falls. Early next morning Rolfe was discovered in his perilous position by Jacob Abbot. The neighbor were rallied, and came to his rscue. Fastening two ropes to a small skiff, they set it out into the middle of the river, and let it go over the rapids so as to strike the rock where Rolfe was -- designing then to draw him to shore in the boat; but as the boat struck the rock it rebounded, so that Rolfe had barely enough time to seize one of the ropes and cut it off with his knife, while the boat was whirled along and dashed into pieces. But the rope which he had in his hand, being held at the other end by his neighbors, he fastened tight round his body, and by this means they drew him over the foaming rapids up the stream about five rods, and he landed in safety! The horse was soon after discovered standing in the water neara ledgy bank, too steep to ascend. A single bruise only was found on him. He was safely rescued.2 Benjamin Rolfe was born on 31 May 1752 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 He was born on 31 May 1753 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.3 He married Molly Sweat at New Hampshire circa 1780.4 He married Molly Sweat at Boscawen, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, on 23 February 1784.2,1 As of 1790, Benjamin Rolfe was also known as Benjamin Ralph.5 Benjamin was listed as the head of a family on the 1790 Census at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Benjamin Ralph, 1 male 16+, 2 males 1-15, 3 females. Perhaps Benjamin and wife plus 4 children, 2 males and 2 females?.4,6 Benjamin 5 (Nathaniel 4 Henry 3 Benjamin 2 Henry 1) b in Haverhill MA 31 May 1752; m Molly Sweatt, and had six children.4 Benjamin was listed as the head of a family on the 1790 Census at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. 1 male above 16; 2 males under 16; 3 females.5 When the [Town House] was raised, Mr. Benjamin Rolfe, brother of Nathaniel and father of Mr. Benjamin Rolfe, now living on State Street, had a finger caught in a mortice, in putting on the south plate, and so badly jammed that it was necessary to amputate it. Dr. Currigain -- celebrated for surgical operations- was immediately called and directed Mr. Rolfe to put his finger on a block. With a chisel and mallet the doctor cut the finger square off at a single blow; but the stump was a sore trouble to Mr. Rolfe as long as he lived, for the end of the bone was always visible, and in cold weather the flesh about it would recede from the bone and crack.7 He and Molly Sweat emigrated between 1794 and 1795 from Rumford, Oxford County, Maine; The family, except for their son John, relocated to Rumford, Maine in the fall/ winter of 1794/5. John then re-joined the family in the spring, at age 10, traveling the blazed trail, alone and on foot.1 Among the early settlers in Rumford, was Capt Benjanim Rolfe, originally from Concofrd, NH. He wa a man of great energy and push, of remarkable strength of mind and body; just the qualities to constitute the successful pioneer settler where a home is to be hewn out in the wilderness, and the land is to be subdued and made habitable for civilized man. Mr. Rolfe settled not far above the Falls, and his brother, Henry Rolfe, was on the other side. There was a blacksmith shop, and the nearest one, on the opposite side of the river in 1808, and sometime in the spring of that year, Mr. Rolfe had occasion to cross over to have his horse shod and a broken chain repaired. For the purpose of crossinga river with teams, the early settlers had a large boat constructed of timber and plank, which was set over by means of a stern oar-- the process known as sculling. It was a busy season of the year, and Mr Rolfe wished to occupy as few of the working hours as possible in attending to the business across the river, and so did not go over until toware night. The perwon having charge of the boat not being present, he set himself across. Now Mr. Rolfe, notwithstanding his good sense and other sterling qualities, had a weakness which was but too common with the early settlers of Rumford and other newly settled towns. He indulged in intoxicating liquors, and sometimes quite freely. On this occasion, while the smithy was doing his work, he went to Wheeler's store, and meeting some of his townspeople there, he indulged in a social glass or two, and didnot get ready to recross the river until sometime after dark. The evening was unusually dark, it being both cloudy and foggy. HIs intellect may also have been a trifle befogged by the potations he had imbibed with his friends. Be this as it may, he found it difficult to keep the right course, and while he plied the oar the current was imperceptibly carrying him toward the great falls.
Near Mr. Rolfe's residence or near the south side of the landing for the boat, a brawling brook came tumbling over rocksw on its way to the river, and hearing the sound of troubled waters, he concluded that he was near the place of destination. But he was soon undeceived. The roaring which he heard was the great cataract, and before he had time to realize his awful situation, the draught of the falls took the boat as though it had been an egg shello and dashed it against the rock in the middle of the river. The concussion threw Mr. Rolfe with his chain upon the rock, and then the boat swung round and was carried over the falls. The horse was also thrown out or jumped out as the boat swung round toward the south bank, and landed near a large rock, but was in such a position that he could not move. Thenext day he was extricated and proved to be not materially injured.
Mr. Rolfe sat down upon his rock, and his thoughts could not have been of the pleasantest character. He well knew that the roaring of the waters would prevent his voice being heard by his friends, and there was no way but to spend the time until daylight where he was.l What added to his discomfort was the rain, which continued through the night, and drenched to the skiin, in utter darkness and deafened bythe ceasless thunderings ofthe maddened waters, he remained in his perilous situation from ten o'clock in the evening until ten o'clock th next morning, twelve long and dreadful hours. He was constantly tortured by the thought that his friends might not be able to relieve him, even in daylight, and this added greatly to the horrors of the situation.
In the morning his absence became known to the little neighborhood and search began to be made. The ferry boat was missing, but crossing the river in a small boat, it was ascertained at what hour he started on the homeward trip. There was now little doubt that he had been carried over the falls, and preparations were being made to look for his dead body below, when some one happened to cast his eye along the head of the falls, and saw the outlines of a human being enveloped in mist and standing upon gthe rock in the midst of the river. The swollen waters nearly covered the rock, so that the lone occupant had little more than standing room.l
The whole neighborhood soon gathered at the falls and some were there from up river, as the news of the probable fatge of their respected townsman had rapidly spread. At first they were nearly paralyzed with astonishment, but soon began to devise means for his relief. They first procured a boat, and with bed-cords on each side of the river, let it down to him; but no sooner had it come into the draft of the falls than it rushed by and was dashed to pieces. They then obtained a light board canoe and let it downthe river part of the way, and drew it back to try the force of the water, but this was likewise dashed to pieces and destroyed as soon as it entered the swift water on the precipice. They, however, got a rope to him by attaching it to a log which floated down until it struck the rock; he put it around him and under his arms and made it fast, then took the chain which he had carried over the river to get mended, and which had been landed with him upon the rock, and was placinhg it over one shoulder, and under the other arm, to bring it to shore withhim. By reason of the roaring of the water his friends could not converse with him, but they made signs to him to leave the chain where he was, because he would be too heavily loaded to bring it with him, and he left it. When all was prepared and the rope well manned, Mr. Rolfe coolly and calmly stepedintothe water, and the men on the shore ran up stream and brought him safely to the bank, to the inexpressible joy of allhis friends there present, and especially of his family. NO sooner had he safely landed than he asked for a chew of tobacco, saying 'he had lodged at a very poor tavern where they had neither rum nor tobacco' (p. 131-133.)8 Benjamin Rolfe died on 1 October 1828 at Rumford, Oxford County, Maine, at age 76.5,1

Family

Molly Sweat b. 1764, d. 27 Jul 1803
Children

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S164] NH Concord Hitory (Bouton 1856), online www.ci.concord.nh.us/library/concordhistory, p. 686.
  3. [S137] New England Historical and Genealogical Register, online http://books.google.com, Volume 3 (1849) -- p. 152, "Some Materials Towards a Genelogy of the Family by the Name of Rolfe."
  4. [S340] Charles Carleton Coffin, History of Boscawen.
  5. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1790 United States Federal Census
    about Nathl. Ralph Junior
    Name:
    Nathl. Ralph Junior
    [Nathl Ralph Junior]

    Township:
    Concord

    County:
    Rockingham

    State:
    New Hampshire

    Number of Free White Males Under 16:
    3

    Number of Free White Males 16 and Over:
    2

    Number of Free White Females:
    4

    Number of Household Members:
    9.
  6. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, Name:
    Benjn Ralph

    Township:
    Concord

    County:
    Rockingham

    State:
    New Hampshire.

  7. [S164] NH Concord Hitory (Bouton 1856), online www.ci.concord.nh.us/library/concordhistory, p. 306.
  8. [S167] ME Oxford County 1890 Rumford History, online http://ia341341.us.archive.org
  9. [S922] Red Rolfe, online http://cowhampshire.blogharbor.com/blog/_archives/2006/5/18/…

Mary Rolfe1

F, b. 23 May 1753, d. between 1800 and 1843
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Mary Rolfe was born on 23 May 1753 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 As of say 1773,her married name was Eastman.2 She married husband Eastman say 1773 at Merrimack County, New Hampshire.2 She witnessed husband Eastman's death at Merrimack County, New Hampshire, say 1789. No record of their every having children.2 As of 2 March 1790,her married name was Simpson.2 Mary Rolfe married Benjamin Simpson on 2 March 1790 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.2 Mary Rolfe died between 1800 and 1843 at Massachusetts.3

Family 1

husband Eastman b. s 1750, d. s 1789
Child

Family 2

Benjamin Simpson b. 1742, d. 27 Nov 1828
Children

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S165] NH Canterbury History, online http://books.google.com
  3. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.
  4. [S165] NH Canterbury History, online http://books.google.com, p, 309.
  5. [S165] NH Canterbury History, online http://books.google.com, p, 310.

Jane Rolfe1

F, b. 28 December 1759, d. between 1760 and 1849
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Jane Rolfe was born on 28 December 1759 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 She died between 1760 and 1849 at Massachusetts.

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php

Elizabeth Rolfe1

F, b. 4 February 1762, d. 17 December 1820
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Elizabeth Rolfe was also known as Elizabeth "Betsy" Roff.2 She was born on 4 February 1762 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 She was born circa 1763 at England; Apparently was a small child emigrating to America when her father was taken by a French press gang during the french and Indian War. The birth date is approximated from this.2 As of 14 December 1785,her married name was Frink.2 She married Samuel Frink on 14 December 1785 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.2 Elizabeth Rolfe died on 17 December 1820 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 58.2

Family

Samuel Frink b. 23 Oct 1757, d. 2 Jan 1832

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Haddock Hastings Brickett Maytham and allied families.

Samuel Frink1

M, b. 23 October 1757, d. 2 January 1832
     Samuel Frink was born on 23 October 1757 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 He married Elizabeth Rolfe, daughter of Nathaniel Rolfe and Hannah Rolfe, on 14 December 1785 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Samuel Frink died on 2 January 1832 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 74.1

Family

Elizabeth Rolfe b. 4 Feb 1762, d. 17 Dec 1820

Citations

  1. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Haddock Hastings Brickett Maytham and allied families.

Unknown male Roff1

M, b. circa 1725, d. circa 1765
     Unknown male Roff was born circa 1725 at England.1 He married Sarah Cox at England circa 1760.1 Unknown male Roff died circa 1765 at Massachusetts.1

Family

Sarah Cox b. c 1729, d. 17 Oct 1822

Citations

  1. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Haddock Hastings Brickett Maytham and allied families.

Sarah Cox1

F, b. circa 1729, d. 17 October 1822
     Sarah Cox was born circa 1729 at England; Birth from Boston Globe article 3/10/1889 which recounts her life in connection with another matter.1 She married Unknown male Roff at England circa 1760.1 As of circa 1760,her married name was Roff.1 As of 17 March 1779,her married name was Pendergast.1 Sarah Cox married Thomas Pendergast on 17 March 1779 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Sarah Cox died on 17 October 1822 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1

Family 1

Unknown male Roff b. c 1725, d. c 1765

Family 2

Thomas Pendergast b. c 1730, d. 1801

Citations

  1. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Haddock Hastings Brickett Maytham and allied families.

Thomas Pendergast1

M, b. circa 1730, d. 1801
     Thomas Pendergast was born circa 1730 at Massachusetts.1 He married Sarah Cox on 17 March 1779 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Thomas Pendergast died in 1801 at Essex County, Massachusetts.1

Family

Sarah Cox b. c 1729, d. 17 Oct 1822

Citations

  1. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Haddock Hastings Brickett Maytham and allied families.

Henry Rolfe1

M, b. 11 June 1756, d. 19 December 1823
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Henry Rolfe was born on 11 June 1756 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts.1,2 He married Dorothy Elliot on 24 February 1793 at Rumford, Oxford County, Maine.1 Among the early settlers in Rumford, was Capt Benjanim Rolfe, originally from Concofrd, NH. He wa a man of great energy and push, of remarkable strength of mind and body; just the qualities to constitute the successful pioneer settler where a home is to be hewn out in the wilderness, and the land is to be subdued and made habitable for civilized man. Mr. Rolfe settled not far above the Falls, and his brother, Henry Rolfe, was on the other side. There was a blacksmith shop, and the nearest one, on the opposite side of the river in 1808, and sometime in the spring of that year, Mr. Rolfe had occasion to cross over to have his horse shod and a broken chain repaired. For the purpose of crossinga river with teams, the early settlers had a large boat constructed of timber and plank, which was set over by means of a stern oar-- the process known as sculling. It was a busy season of the year, and Mr Rolfe wished to occupy as few of the working hours as possible in attending to the business across the river, and so did not go over until toware night. The perwon having charge of the boat not being present, he set himself across. Now Mr. Rolfe, notwithstanding his good sense and other sterling qualities, had a weakness which was but too common with the early settlers of Rumford and other newly settled towns. He indulged in intoxicating liquors, and sometimes quite freely. On this occasion, while the smithy was doing his work, he went to Wheeler's store, and meeting some of his townspeople there, he indulged in a social glass or two, and didnot get ready to recross the river until sometime after dark. The evening was unusually dark, it being both cloudy and foggy. HIs intellect may also have been a trifle befogged by the potations he had imbibed with his friends. Be this as it may, he found it difficult to keep the right course, and while he plied the oar the current was imperceptibly carrying him toward the great falls.
Near Mr. Rolfe's residence or near the south side of the landing for the boat, a brawling brook came tumbling over rocksw on its way to the river, and hearing the sound of troubled waters, he concluded that he was near the place of destination. But he was soon undeceived. The roaring which he heard was the great cataract, and before he had time to realize his awful situation, the draught of the falls took the boat as though it had been an egg shello and dashed it against the rock in the middle of the river. The concussion threw Mr. Rolfe with his chain upon the rock, and then the boat swung round and was carried over the falls. The horse was also thrown out or jumped out as the boat swung round toward the south bank, and landed near a large rock, but was in such a position that he could not move. Thenext day he was extricated and proved to be not materially injured.
Mr. Rolfe sat down upon his rock, and his thoughts could not have been of the pleasantest character. He well knew that the roaring of the waters would prevent his voice being heard by his friends, and there was no way but to spend the time until daylight where he was.l What added to his discomfort was the rain, which continued through the night, and drenched to the skiin, in utter darkness and deafened bythe ceasless thunderings ofthe maddened waters, he remained in his perilous situation from ten o'clock in the evening until ten o'clock th next morning, twelve long and dreadful hours. He was constantly tortured by the thought that his friends might not be able to relieve him, even in daylight, and this added greatly to the horrors of the situation.
In the morning his absence became known to the little neighborhood and search began to be made. The ferry boat was missing, but crossing the river in a small boat, it was ascertained at what hour he started on the homeward trip. There was now little doubt that he had been carried over the falls, and preparations were being made to look for his dead body below, when some one happened to cast his eye along the head of the falls, and saw the outlines of a human being enveloped in mist and standing upon gthe rock in the midst of the river. The swollen waters nearly covered the rock, so that the lone occupant had little more than standing room.l
The whole neighborhood soon gathered at the falls and some were there from up river, as the news of the probable fatge of their respected townsman had rapidly spread. At first they were nearly paralyzed with astonishment, but soon began to devise means for his relief. They first procured a boat, and with bed-cords on each side of the river, let it down to him; but no sooner had it come into the draft of the falls than it rushed by and was dashed to pieces. They then obtained a light board canoe and let it downthe river part of the way, and drew it back to try the force of the water, but this was likewise dashed to pieces and destroyed as soon as it entered the swift water on the precipice. They, however, got a rope to him by attaching it to a log which floated down until it struck the rock; he put it around him and under his arms and made it fast, then took the chain which he had carried over the river to get mended, and which had been landed with him upon the rock, and was placinhg it over one shoulder, and under the other arm, to bring it to shore withhim. By reason of the roaring of the water his friends could not converse with him, but they made signs to him to leave the chain where he was, because he would be too heavily loaded to bring it with him, and he left it. When all was prepared and the rope well manned, Mr. Rolfe coolly and calmly stepedintothe water, and the men on the shore ran up stream and brought him safely to the bank, to the inexpressible joy of allhis friends there present, and especially of his family. NO sooner had he safely landed than he asked for a chew of tobacco, saying 'he had lodged at a very poor tavern where they had neither rum nor tobacco' (p. 131-133.)3 Henry Rolfe died on 17 December 1823 at Rumford, Oxford County, Maine, at age 67.2 He died on 19 December 1823 at Rumford, Oxford County, Maine, at age 67.1

Family

Dorothy Elliot b. 1769, d. 1 Apr 1837
Children

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Roundy Family Tree.
  3. [S167] ME Oxford County 1890 Rumford History, online http://ia341341.us.archive.org
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Mallin Family Tree.

Polly Rolfe1

F, b. circa 1756, d. between 1789 and 1846
FatherNathaniel Rolfe1 b. 26 Jan 1713/14, d. Dec 1808
MotherHannah Rolfe1 b. 25 Sep 1720, d. 1793
     Polly Rolfe was born circa 1756 at Essex County, Massachusetts.1 She was born in 1768 at Essex County, Massachusetts.1 As of circa 1788,her married name was Morris.1 She married Thomas Morris circa 1788 at Massachusetts.1 Polly Rolfe died between 1789 and 1846 at Massachusetts.

Family

Thomas Morris b. c 1750, d. bt 1789 - 1840

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php

Thomas Morris1

M, b. circa 1750, d. between 1789 and 1840
     Thomas Morris was born circa 1750 at Massachusetts.1 He married Polly Rolfe, daughter of Nathaniel Rolfe and Hannah Rolfe, circa 1788 at Massachusetts.1 Thomas Morris died between 1789 and 1840 at Massachusetts.

Family

Polly Rolfe b. c 1756, d. bt 1789 - 1846

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php

Susannah Lowe1

F, b. 1 January 1719, d. 15 January 1762
     Susannah Lowe was born on 1 January 1719 at Chebacco, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 As of 31 January 1738,her married name was Perley.1 She married Asa Perley, son of Thomas Perley Jr and Sarah Osgood, on 31 January 1738 at Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts.1 Susannah died on 15 January 1762 at Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 43.2

Family

Asa Perley b. 10 Oct 1716, d. 10 Apr 1806
Child

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Crosby Family Tree.

Ruth Heard1

F, b. 10 March 1722, d. 24 April 1806
     Ruth Heard was also known as Ruth Heard Kimball.2 She was born on 10 March 1722 at Essex County, Massachusetts.1 She a widow.2 As of circa 10 November 1781,her married name was Perley.1 She married Asa Perley at Bradford, Essex County, Massachusetts, on 8 December 1781.1,3 Ruth Heard died on 24 April 1806 at Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 84.1

Family

Asa Perley b. 10 Oct 1716, d. 10 Apr 1806

Citations

  1. [S130] Perley Genealogy, online http://www.mts.net/~reldridg/perley.html
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com.

Elizabeth Porter1

F, b. 12 October 1735, d. 6 September 1819
FatherJohn Porter1 b. 1712, d. 1759
MotherApphiah Putnam1 b. 8 Jul 1716, d. 28 Dec 1780
     Elizabeth Porter was baptized on 12 October 1735 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts.2 She was born on 12 October 1735 at Essex County, Massachusetts.1 As of 4 March 1756,her married name was Leach.3 She married Asa Leach at Salem Village (after 1757 Danvers), Essex County, Massachusetts, on 4 March 1756.4 Elizabeth Porter died on 6 September 1819 at Beverly, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 83.5

Citations

  1. [S42] Rolfe Family 1995, online http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Herrick -2-1-04.
  4. [S565] NEHGS Website, online www.nehgs.org, VRs of MA until 1850.
  5. [S131] Putnam Genealogy, online http://sites.google.com/site/putnamgenealogy/

Knight Simon De Puttenham1

M, b. 1150, d. between 1200 and 1220
     Knight Simon De Puttenham was born in 1150 at England.1 He married unknown wife ? circa 1190 at England.1 Knight Simon De Puttenham died between 1200 and 1220 at England; "He was living in 1199."1,2

Family

unknown wife ? b. c 1170, d. bt 1195 - 1240
Children

Citations

  1. [S131] Putnam Genealogy, online http://sites.google.com/site/putnamgenealogy/
  2. [S1191] Leasa Varden Genealogical D, online lmhs.org/cWcustom/Leasa.

unknown wife ?1

F, b. circa 1170, d. between 1195 and 1240
     Unknown wife ? was born circa 1170 at England.1 As of circa 1190,her married name was Puttenham.1 She married Knight Simon De Puttenham circa 1190 at England.1 Unknown wife ? died between 1195 and 1240 at England.1

Family

Knight Simon De Puttenham b. 1150, d. bt 1200 - 1220
Children

Citations

  1. [S131] Putnam Genealogy, online http://sites.google.com/site/putnamgenealogy/