Nathaniel Piper1

M, b. 4 April 1627, d. 26 September 1676
     Nathaniel Piper was born on 4 April 1627 at Dartmouth, Devonshire, England; Family Data Collection - Births about Nathaniel Piper
Name:     Nathaniel Piper
Father:     Josiah Piper
Birth Date:     4 Apr 1627
City:     Dartmouth
County:     Devonshire
Country:     England.2 He married Sarah Edwards at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, on 7 April 1655.3 Nathaniel died on 26 September 1676 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 49.2

Family

Sarah Edwards b. 9 Nov 1631, d. Apr 1696

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Drum Family Tree.
  3. [S1041] Dawes-Gates Ancestral LInes, online www.ancestry.com.

Abraham Van Tuyl1

M, b. say July 1731, d. 28 March 1742
FatherDennis Van Tuyl1 b. 12 Aug 1707, d. 5 Dec 1738
MotherNeeltje Croesen1 b. 4 Apr 1713, d. 16 Sep 1776
     Abraham Van Tuyl was born say July 1731 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York.1 He was baptized on 1 August 1731 at Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, New York; citing Title: Staten Island Church Records
Author: Wright, Tobias Alexander
Publication: Heritage Books, Inc.1 He died on 28 March 1742 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York; drowned.2

Citations

  1. [S347] William Henry Roll, downloaded Sept 2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Hix New.

Denys Van Tuyl1

M, b. 30 August 1734, d. 11 March 1756
FatherDennis Van Tuyl1 b. 12 Aug 1707, d. 5 Dec 1738
MotherNeeltje Croesen1 b. 4 Apr 1713, d. 16 Sep 1776
     Denys Van Tuyl was born on 30 August 1734 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York.1,2 He was baptized on 8 September 1734 at Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, New York; citing Staten Island Church Records
Author: Wright, Tobias Alexander
Publication: Heritage Books, Inc.1 He died on 11 March 1756 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York, at age 21; Drowned by the upsetting of the Staten Island Ferry.2

Citations

  1. [S347] William Henry Roll, downloaded Sept 2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Hix New.

Neeltje Van Tuyl1

F, b. 25 January 1738/39, d. between 1759 and 1790
FatherDennis Van Tuyl1 b. 12 Aug 1707, d. 5 Dec 1738
MotherNeeltje Croesen1 b. 4 Apr 1713, d. 16 Sep 1776
     Neeltje Van Tuyl was born on 25 January 1738/39 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York.1,2 She was baptized on 4 March 1739 at Port Richmond, Staten Island, Richmond County, New York.1 As of 18 March 1757,her married name was Vanderbilt.2 She married Cornelius Vanderbilt on 18 March 1757 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York.2 Neeltje Van Tuyl died between 1759 and 1790 at Richmond County, New York.

Family

Cornelius Vanderbilt b. 22 Sep 1731, d. 23 Sep 1767

Citations

  1. [S347] William Henry Roll, downloaded Sept 2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Hix New.

Dr Daniel Greenleaf Jr1,2

M, b. 7 November 1702, d. 18 July 1785
     Dr Daniel Greenleaf Jr was born on 7 November 1702 at Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.1,2 He married Silence Nichols at Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on 18 July 1726.1,3 He witnessed Silence Nichols's death at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, on 3 May 1762.4 He married Dorothy "Dolly" Wilder at Lancaster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, on 18 November 1762.1,5 Dr Daniel Greenleaf Jr died on 18 July 1785 at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 82.2

Family 1

Silence Nichols b. 4 Jul 1702, d. 3 May 1762
Child

Family 2

Dorothy "Dolly" Wilder b. s 1710, d. 1783

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Dr Daniel Greenleaf, Jr.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Daniel Greenleaf in the Massachusetts Town and vital Records, 1620-1988.
  4. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Silence Nichols Greenleaf.
  5. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Greenleafs Ipswich to Iowa.

Silence Nichols1,2

F, b. 4 July 1702, d. 3 May 1762
     Silence Nichols was born on 4 July 1702 at Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.1,2 As of 12 July 1722,her married name was Marsh.3 She married David Marsh on 12 July 1722 at Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.3 She married Dr Daniel Greenleaf Jr at Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on 18 July 1726.1,4 Her married name was Greenleaf.1 Silence died on 3 May 1762 at Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 59.2

Family 1

David Marsh b. 1693, d. 16 Mar 1724

Family 2

Dr Daniel Greenleaf Jr b. 7 Nov 1702, d. 18 Jul 1785
Child

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Silence Nichols Greenleaf.
  3. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, David Marsh.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Daniel Greenleaf in the Massachusetts Town and vital Records, 1620-1988.

Josiah Richardson1

M, b. say 1705, d. between 1731 and 1761
     Josiah Richardson was born say 1705 at Middlesex County, Massachusetts.1,2 He married Dorothy "Dolly" Wilder at Lancaster, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, on 3 December 1730.1,2 Josiah Richardson died between 1731 and 1761 at Worcester County, Massachusetts.2

Family

Dorothy "Dolly" Wilder b. s 1710, d. 1783

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Greenleafs Ipswich to Iowa.

Salome Stout1

F, b. 10 September 1743, d. 18 September 1827
     Salome Stout was also known as Elizabeth Salome Stout.2 She was born on 10 September 1743 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania; dau of Jacob Stout and Anna Liesse-Miller.2 As of 1765,her married name was Freed.3 She married Abraham Freed at Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on 20 September 1765.3,4 She witnessed Abraham Freed's death at Fountainville, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on 21 December 1772. "leaving three infant daujghters.".3 Salome Stout married Johann Gabriel Schwartzlaender, son of Philip Swartzlander and Maria Magdalena Petzel, in 1774 at Pennsylvania; "At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham Freed, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (Liesse-Miller) Stout, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume."1,3 As of 1774,her married name was Swartzlander.1 As of 1774,her married name was Schwartzlaender.1,3 "Jacob Stout owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel Schwartzlander." in 1779 at Pennsylvania.3 Salome Stout died on 18 September 1827 at Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at age 84.2,4 She is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.3

Family 1

Abraham Freed b. 30 Sep 1740, d. 21 Dec 1772
Child

Family 2

Johann Gabriel Schwartzlaender b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
Children

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Pardee Family Tree.
  3. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Susan Myers Family Tree.

Jacob Swartzlander1

M, b. 30 January 1778, d. 3 July 1845
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     Jacob Swartzlander was born on 30 January 1778 at New Britain, Bucks County, Pennsylvania; "was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old Schwartlander mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township."2,3 He was occup1 "He learned the trade and assisted in the operating the mill until 1808, whjen he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845." between 1800 and 1845 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.2 He married Elizabeth Cope at Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on 5 November 1807.2,4 He witnessed Elizabeth Cope's death at Southampton, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in August 1817.2,3 He married Elizabeth Moode at Bucks County, Pennsylvania, on 22 September 1818.2,3 Jacob Swartzlander died on 3 July 1845 at Southampton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at age 67; His widow survived him many years.2,3 He is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Family 1

Elizabeth Cope b. 14 May 1788, d. Aug 1817
Children

Family 2

Elizabeth Moode b. 1 Jun 1794, d. 29 Dec 1888
Children

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Pardee Family Tree.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Moon-Gaertner-Harrison-Kehrl.

Margaret Swartzlander1

F, b. 2 November 1779, d. 1858
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     Margaret Swartzlander was born on 2 November 1779 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.1,2,3 She was a witness "A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run." with Joseph Swartzlander at Pine Run, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.2 As of circa 1800,her married name was Kratz.2 Margaret Swartzlander died in 1858 at Pennsylvania.4 She is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, McCombs, Klauder.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Wolfe, King.

Philip Swartzlander1

M, b. 1785, d. 1795
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     Philip Swartzlander was born in 1785 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.1,2,3 He died in 1795 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania; "died young."2,3 He is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Philip Swartzlander.

Abraham Swartzlander1

M, b. 1783, d. 1788
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     Abraham Swartzlander was born in 1783 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.1,2,3 He died in 1788 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania; "died young."2,3 He is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Rausch Family tree.

Joseph Swartzlander1

M, b. 22 February 1786, d. 7 March 1875
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     Joseph Swartzlander was born on 22 February 1786 at Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.1,2,3 He "A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run." at Pine Run, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.2 He married Christiana Strawn say 1821 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.4 Joseph Swartzlander died on 7 March 1875 at Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at age 89.3 He is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Family

Christiana Strawn b. 14 Sep 1801, d. 14 Mar 1839

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, McCombs, Klauder.
  4. [S123] Findagrave.com, online www.findagrave.com, Christiana Strawn Swartzlander.

David Swartzlander1

M, b. 18 April 1788, d. 18 October 1853
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     David Swartzlander was born on 18 April 1788 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.1,2,3 He died on 18 October 1853 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at age 65.3 He is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Rausch Family tree.

John Swartzlander1

M, b. 26 September 1774, d. 18 April 1815
FatherJohann Gabriel Schwartzlaender1 b. 31 Mar 1747, d. 17 Jul 1814
MotherSalome Stout1 b. 10 Sep 1743, d. 18 Sep 1827
     John Swartzlander was born on 26 September 1774 at Swartzlanders Mill, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.1,2,3 He married Mary Overpeck on 22 September 1808 at Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.3 John Swartzlander died on 18 April 1815 at Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at age 40.3 He is included in the biography of Philip Swartzlander; DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER

DR. FRANK SWARTZLANDER, physician and surgeon, of Doylestown, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, February 9, 1842, being a son of Joseph and Abigail (RANKIN) SWARTZLANDER, the former of German and the latter of English descent, though both were descended through several generations of American birth. On the paternal side the SWARTZLANDERS are descended from Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, who came from Steinhardt, in Schwarzwald, arriving in Philadelphia on November 8, 1752, in the ship "Snow Louisa," Captain John Pitcairn, from Rotterdam. The voyage had been a long and perilous one, and many of the passengers had died on the way. Among these was the wife of Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, leaving on his hands two children, Gabriel, aged seven years, and Barbara, aged five. Soon after his arrival in Pennsylvania, Philip SCHWARTZLANDER

found a home in New Britain township, Bucks county, where he married Margaret ANGEL, by whom he had two children, Conrad and Philip, descendants of whom still reside in that locality. Philip SCHWARTZLANDER, Sr., died in 1784, and is buried in the New Britain churchyard.

Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER, born in Steinhardt, March 31, 1747, spent his boyhood days in New Britain township, where he learned the trade of a miller. At the age of twenty-seven years he married Salome, the widow of Abraham FREED, and daughter of Jacob and Anna (LEISSE-MILLER) STOUT, an account of whose ancestry is given on another page of this volume. Abraham FREED, the first husband of Salome STOUT, had purchased of his father-in-law the Pine Run mill property, one mile north of Doylestown, and also owned about two hundred acres of land adjoining the mill and extending over into Plumstead township. He died in 1773, leaving three infant daughters, and a year later the widow married Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. By proceedings in the orphans' court the mill and about fifty acres of land were sold for the payment of debts, and were purchased by Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. The remaining 150 acres of FREED descended to his two surviving daughters, one of whom married John KRATZ, whose descendants still own and reside on a portion of the land on the Plumstead side of the line. John KRATZ later found a second wife in a daughter of Gabriel and Salome SCHWARTZLANDER, and half-sister to his first wife. Jacob STOUT owned considerable other land adjoining the mill on the west, which on his death in 1779 descended to his daughter Salome, and was later transferred to her husband, Gabriel SCHWARTZLANDER. He operated the mill until his death July 17, 1814. The children of Gabriel and Salome SWARTZLANDER were: John, Magdalen, Jacob, Margaret, Catharine, Abraham, Joseph, Philip, and David. Of these, Abraham and Philip died young A number of the descendants of Joseph and the daughters still reside in the neighborhood of Pine Run. At the death of Gabriel SWARTZLANDER in 1814, his extensive real estate holdings were partitioned among his children by proceedings in the orphans' court, the mill property falling to Joseph, who owned and operated it until his death, the title remaining in the family for nearly a century.

Jacob SWARTZLANDER, the grandfather of Dr. SWARTZLANDER, was the second son of Gabriel and Salome, and was born at the old SWARTZLANDER mill property in New Britain, now Doylestown township. He learned the trade and assisted in operating the mill until 1808, when he removed to Southampton township, where he purchased a mill property which he operated until his death in 1845. He was twice married; by his first wife, Elizabeth COPE, of Hilltown, he had four children: Abraham, Gabriel, Joseph and Salome. He married (second) Elizabeth MOODE, of Southampton, by whom he had four daughters: Emily, Clara, Wilhelmina and Harriet. His widow survived him many years. Abraham, the eldest son, was also a miller and operated and owned a mill in Middletown. He was killed in May, 1839, by the falling of a wall of a barn which workmen, under his direction, were tearing down. He left a widow Rebecca, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

Joseph SWARTZLANDER, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Southampton township, Bucks county, January 1, 1812, and ended an eventful and useful career at Yardley, Bucks county, in May, 1903. He obtained the rudiments of an education at the public schools of his native township, and later attended the academy of Rev. Samuel AARON, at Burlington, New Jersey. He learned the milling trade with his father at the Rocksville mill. In 1834 he started on a memorable trip through what was then our western states. Traveling by stage coach, canal boat and on foot, he reached Zanesville, Ohio, where he was stricken with smallpox. A stranger in a strange land, and having a contagious disease, he was fortunate in securing the services of an aged negress who had known the family in Bucks county. She nursed him back to health in her hut in the woods, and received for compensation his gold watch, which was returned to him several years later. On his recovery he continued his journey, taking passage on a flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans. After a brief stay in this cosmopolitan southern city he returned by steamer to St. Louis, from which point he and a companion tramped overland to Detroit, Michigan, a distance of five hundred and sixty-four miles. Crossing the swamps and lagoons where Chicago now stands, they stopped at Fort Dearborn, the nucleus of the now famous "Windy City," and proceeded on their way to Detroit. From Detroit the travellers went to Buffalo, thence down the Erie canal to Rochester, New York, from there to Albany, and thence overland to Boston, Massachusetts, from which point Mr. SWARTZLANDER returned to his home in Southampton, where he resumed the occupation of a miller. Prior to his father's death in 1845 he removed to Yardley, where he operated a grist and saw mill. At the time of the Irish famine he was one of the largest grain dealers and millers in Bucks county, operating at one and the same time the Rocksville, Bridgetown, and Yardley mills, handling, grinding and kiln-drying immense quantities of corn and cornmeal which he shipped to New York and Philadelphia for exportation to Ireland. Through the dishonesty or default of a firm of commission merchants to whom he shipped his product he lost of $12,000, an immense sum in those days, and was ruined financially, but by industry and a close application to business succeeded in paying off his indebtedness and acquiring a competence. In 1860 he practically abandoned the grain business and devoted himself almost exclusively to the lumber business, buying native timber in the woods and sawing it into ship timber which he shipped to the shipyards at Williamsburg, New York, and Philadelphia. He was a very active business man, and continued to personally conduct his business in connection with his son Harry until within a few months of his death at the age of ninety-one years. Joseph SWARTZLANDER married, in 1837, Abigail RANKIN, a daughter of William RANKIN, a well known merchant at Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery county. Their children were: Mary, wife of Daniel BEANS, of Newtown; Dr. Frank, the subject of this sketch; Albert, a lawyer at Omaha, Nebraska; Laura, Harry and Ella, residing at Yardley; and Fred, a physician at Omaha, Nebraska.

Dr. Frank SWARTZLANDER, the eldest son, was born in Northampton, February 9, 1842, and was therefore a mere child when the family removed to Yardley, where he attended the public schools and was later a student in Philadelphia. He began the study of medicine in 1860 with Dr. Joseph SMITH, of Yardley, and was later under the preceptorship of Dr. Rufus TRYON, of Philadelphia, late surgeon-general of the United States Navy. Dr. SWARTZLANDER entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. Showing a remarkable aptitude for surgery, he was appointed in 1862, while still a student anatomist at the Military Hospital, located at Twenty-fourth and South streets, Philadelphia, where he made all the post mortem examinations until his graduation at the University in 1863. In March, 1863, he was appointed assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and went with his regiment to the front, passing through many trying scenes during the civil war. He was at the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, John's Island, S. C., and many other sanguinary engagements. At Gettysburg he was surgeon of the operating staff of the field hospital of the Third Division of the Eleventh Army Corps. When the Seventy-fourth Regiment was mustered out he accepted a commission as assistant surgeon of Volunteers and was sent south to meet Sherman's army on its march from "Atlanta to the Sea." General Sherman had just arrived at Savannah when Dr. SWARTZLANDER reached the army, and he was assigned the charge of the Military Hospital at the Marshall House, and later had charge successively of the hospitals at the Scriven House and Pavillion House, and remained in the hospital service until the close of the war. After attending special lectures at the University he located at Doylestown in 1866, and began the practice of his profession. He soon built up a large practice, and enjoys an enviable reputation as a physician and surgeon.

Dr. SWARTZLANDER was married in October, 1872, to Susan, daughter of John S. BRYAN. She died February 4, 1884. Their children are: Dr. Frank B. SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician at Doylestown; Dr. Joseph SWARTZLANDER, a practicing physician of Forest Grove, Buckingham township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania; and Susan, who resides with her father. Dr. SWARTZLANDER was for twenty consecutive years physician of the Bucks County Almshouse, and later filled the same position for three years. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion of the United States. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Text taken from pages 187 to 189 of:

Davis, William W. H., A.M., History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania [New York-Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1905] Volume III

Transcribed MARCH 2001 by GRACE T. BURTON of EAGLEVILLE, PA as part of the Bucks Co., Early Family Project, www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/bucksindex.html

Published March 2001 on the Bucks county, Pa., USGenWeb pages at www.rootsweb.com/~pabucks/.2

Family

Mary Overpeck b. 20 Jan 1788, d. 10 Jan 1867

Citations

  1. [S43] Gary Rolph guess, based on information provided by Jean Rolph from unknown source 9-02 (maybe contact e-mail address).
  2. [S407] Dr. Frank Swartzlander, online, from Volume III.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, McCombs, Klauder.

John Betts Jr.1

M, b. 11 August 1735, d. 8 June 1809
     John Betts Jr. was born on 11 August 1735 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1,2 He married Lydia Ketchum, daughter of Samuel Ketchum and Sarah Hurlbut, on 17 February 1765 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 John Betts Jr. witnessed the death of Lydia Betts on 12 June 1766 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 John Betts Jr. married Leah Taylor on 10 January 1773 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut; The said John Betts married Leah Hickox, Jan. 10, 1773.1
John Betts Jr. and Lydia Ketchum married Feb. 17, 1765.
Samuel Betts, born April 26, 1766.

The said Lydia Betts departed this life, the 12 day of June, 1766.
The said John Betts married Leah Hickox, Jan. 10, 1773.
Lydia Betts, born May 1774. d. Aug. 1775.
John Goold Betts, born Dec. 24, 1775. d. Dec. 4, 1776.
Sarah Betts, born Sept. 9 1779.
Esther Betts, born Jan. 15 1781. d. Jan. 2, 1785.
Charles Betts, born Nov. 8, 1783
Esther Betts, born Dec. 8, 1785.
John Goold Betts, born Dec. 24, 1787.
George Betts, born May 7, 1787.1 John Betts Jr. died on 8 June 1809 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, at age 73.2

Family 1

Lydia Ketcham b. 1747, d. 12 Jun 1766
Child

Family 2

Leah Taylor b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
Children

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Smith, Guy and other related families tree.

Samuel Betts1

M, b. 26 April 1766, d. between 1767 and 1856
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLydia Ketcham1 b. 1747, d. 12 Jun 1766
     Samuel Betts was born on 26 April 1766 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 He died between 1767 and 1856 at Fairfield County, Connecticut; nothing further found; perhaps died young since mother died at his birth?2

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.

Leah Taylor1,2

F, b. 26 August 1749, d. 1810
     Leah Taylor was born on 26 August 1749 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1,2 As of 3 March 1764,her married name was Hickok.2 She married Carter Hickok on 3 March 1764 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.2 She witnessed Carter Hickok's death at Wilton, Fairfield County, Connecticut, in 1773.2 Leah Taylor married John Betts Jr. on 10 January 1773 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut; The said John Betts married Leah Hickox, Jan. 10, 1773.1
As of 10 January 1773,her married name was Betts.1 Leah Taylor died in 1810 at Wilton, Fairfield County, Connecticut.2

Family 1

Carter Hickok b. 19 Apr 1746, d. 1773

Family 2

John Betts Jr. b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
Children

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ufford-Bartlett Family Tree.

Lydia Betts1

F, b. May 1774, d. August 1775
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     Lydia Betts was born in May 1774 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 She died in August 1775 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, at age 1.1

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

John Goold Betts1

M, b. 24 December 1775, d. 4 December 1776
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     John Goold Betts was born on 24 December 1775 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 He died on 4 December 1776 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

Sarah Betts1

F, b. 9 September 1779, d. 17 September 1847
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     Sarah Betts was born on 9 September 1779 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 As of circa 1800,her married name was McEwen.2 She married Charles McEwen circa 1800 at Fairfield County, Connecticut.2 Sarah Betts died on 17 September 1847 at Fairfield County, Connecticut, at age 68.2

Family

Charles McEwen b. 1779, d. 1837

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Baker Family Tree.

Esther Betts1

F, b. 15 January 1781, d. 2 January 1785
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     Esther Betts was born on 15 January 1781 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 She died on 2 January 1785 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, at age 3.1

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

Charles Betts1

M, b. 8 November 1783, d. 5 August 1784
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     Charles Betts was born on 8 November 1783 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 He died on 5 August 1784 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.2

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Colles 2011.

Esther Betts1

F, b. 8 December 1785, d. 30 September 1805
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     Esther Betts was born on 8 December 1785 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 She died on 30 September 1805 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, at age 19.2

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Betts Family.

John Goold Betts1

M, b. 24 December 1787, d. between 1788 and 1877
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     John Goold Betts was born on 24 December 1787 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 He died between 1788 and 1877 at Fairfield County, Connecticut; nothing further found.2

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.

George Betts1

M, b. 7 May 1787, d. between 1788 and 1877
FatherJohn Betts Jr.1 b. 11 Aug 1735, d. 8 Jun 1809
MotherLeah Taylor1 b. 26 Aug 1749, d. 1810
     George Betts was born on 7 May 1787 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut.1 He died between 1788 and 1877 at Fairfield County, Connecticut; nothing further found.2

Citations

  1. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  2. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.

Nathaniel Ketchum1

M, b. 17 March 1710/11, d. January 1805
FatherNathaniel Ketchum2 b. 23 Jan 1679/80, d. 19 Sep 1738
MotherSarah Wakeling2 b. 1 Dec 1683, d. 1738
     Nathaniel Ketchum was also known as Nathaniel Ketcham.2 He was born on 17 March 1710/11 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut; Ketcham Genealogy website has 12 Mar 1711.2 He married Sarah Ketcham at Wilton, Fairfield County, Connecticut, circa 1735.3,4 Nathaniel Ketchum died in January 1805 at Pompey, Onondaga County, New York, at age 93.1

Family

Sarah Ketcham b. 1710, d. 21 Nov 1811
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Kathryn Reese Family Tree.
  2. [S349] Unknown author, unknown record type, quoting Norwalk Genealogical Registry, "INDEX TO THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL RECORDS OF NORWALK, CONNECTICUT THE RECORDS OF MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS Compiled and published by Edwin Hall, pastor of the First Congregational Churchof Norwalk, Connecticut. New York: Baker & Scribner, published 1847.Faithfully transcribed, indexed and contributed to the Fairfield County, CT USGenWeb Project by Barbara Kaye, e-mail address , March 1999."

  3. [S276] John M. Ketcham, July 2004; uploaded Sept 2000.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, My Gerard & Gardner Ancestors.