John Lingle1

M, b. circa 1789, d. 1 March 1833
FatherFrancis Lingle2 b. c 1755, d. bt 30 Aug 1834 - Feb 1848
MotherMaria Eva ?2 b. s 1760, d. 21 May 1835
     John Lingle was farmer.3 He was born circa 1789 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1,3 He married Elizabeth Cruse, daughter of Adam Cruse and Rosanna Kress, circa 1815 at North Carolina.1 John Lingle married Elizabeth Cruse, daughter of Adam Cruse and Rosanna Kress, in 1815 at Rowan County, North Carolina.4,3 Adam, Rosanna, Sophia, John, Elizabeth, John, Henry, Peter, Sophia, Jacob, Samuel and John immigrated, in 1818. Destination: Union County Illinois.5 John Lingle died on 1 March 1833 at Union County, Illinois.1,3 He was buried at Casper Cemeery, Anna, Union County, Illinois.3

Family

Elizabeth Cruse b. 19 Jan 1792, d. 28 May 1835
Children

Citations

  1. [S38] Lingle Family, online http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~reburke/troutman/…
  2. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Lingle Family.
  3. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 17/485.
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Mowery,Cannon,Cruse and Pool.
  5. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 12/485.
  6. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Read-Dillow Tree_2008-07-01.

Elizabeth Cruse1

F, b. 19 January 1792, d. 28 May 1835
FatherAdam Cruse2 b. 15 Nov 1761, d. 5 Mar 1821
MotherRosanna Kress2 b. 8 Nov 1763, d. 1829
     Elizabeth Cruse was also known as Elizabeth (Betsey) Cruse.2 She was born on 19 January 1792 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1,3,4 She was baptized on 8 July 1792 at Organ Lutheran Church, Rowan County, North Carolina.4 Elizabeth was probably a free white female, under age 10, in Adam Cruse's household on the 1800 Census at Salisbury, Cabarrus County, North Carolina; Adam Cruse 3 1 0 1 0; 1 2 0 1 0; 00. The 3 males 0 thru 9 could be Jacob (1); Peter (3) and Henry (4). Philip (6) is here listed as 10-15. Adam (39) is listed as 1 male 26-44. The one female under 10 is Elizabeth (8). Sophia (10) is one female 10-15 -- who is the other one? Rosanna is the 1 female 26-44.5 As of circa 1815,her married name was Lingle.1 Elizabeth Cruse married John Lingle, son of Francis Lingle and Maria Eva ?, circa 1815 at North Carolina.1 She married an unknown person at Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1815.6,4 Elizabeth Cruse lived; 1800 Cabarrus County, NC.2 Adam, Rosanna, Sophia, John, Elizabeth, John, Henry, Peter, Sophia, Jacob, Samuel and John immigrated, in 1818. Destination: Union County Illinois.7 Elizabeth Cruse died on 28 May 1835 at Union County, Illinois, at age 43.1,4 She was buried at Casper Cemetery, Anna, Union County, Illinois.4

Family

John Lingle b. c 1789, d. 1 Mar 1833
Children

Citations

  1. [S38] Lingle Family, online http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~reburke/troutman/…
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 13/485.
  4. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 17/485.
  5. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com.
  6. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Mowery,Cannon,Cruse and Pool.
  7. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 12/485.
  8. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Read-Dillow Tree_2008-07-01.

Adam Cruse1

M, b. 15 November 1761, d. 5 March 1821
FatherJohann Phillip Grüss1 b. 29 Dec 1722, d. 6 Aug 1804
MotherAnna Catherina ?1 b. 1735, d. 1805
     Adam Cruse was also known as Johann Adam Cruse.2 He was born on 13 October 1761 at Red Hill Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.2 He was baptized on 15 November 1761 at St. Paul's Lutheran (Red Hill) Church, Red Hill, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.3,4 Johann, Anna, Johann, Magdalena, Adam, Andrew and Anna immigrated, between 1765 and 1769. Destination: an unknown place .5,6,2 Adam Cruse was confirmed on 12 November 1775 at Organ Lutheran Church, Rowan County, North Carolina.3 Adam Cruse was also known as John Adam (Adam) Cruse.1 Adam Cruse was also known as Johann Adam Gruse. He married Rosanna Kress at Organ Lutheran Church, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, on 18 October 1784.4 Adam Cruse was a witness Book 2 Minutes of Mecklenburg Co NC Ct of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1788 Oct session entry 221 -- Grand Jury empaneled, Adam Cruse was on jury, so was George Goodman. same book 1790 April sesson entry 306 - (Ferguson, p. 95) - ordered by the court that a public road be laid off int his county in the following manner Viz: Beginning where the public road that leads ffrom Tindals ferry on the Yadkin a southwest course to [where] the mecklenburg line joins said line, thence to Drake harrises, thence into the Great Road leading from Salisbury to Charleston near to Jacob Bogars, which road the following jury are to lay off the straightest and best way [to wit]: George Goodman included. They or any twelve of them be empowered to proceed to lay off such road and that Harris be apointed overseer of said road. with George Goodman Sr. between 1788 and 1790 at Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.1 Adam Cruse on 1 January 1789 at Zion (Organ) Lutheran Church, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, signed the Constitution of the Organ Church, together with either P or PO; On 1 Jan 1789, the following Lentz people signed the Constitution of Organ Church: Bastian Lentz (Sr. or Jr.?); D- Dewalt Lentz (Sr.); Peter Lentz (B2-, age 27); and Jacob Lentz (B7- age 12). Some others known to have been friends and future in-laws of the Lentz family signed as follows: Peter Barringer, John Adam Cruse, Philip Cruse, Valentine Hornberger, George Michael Heilig, Frederick Miller, Wendel Miller, George Ludwig, (Lewis) Sifford, and William Siffert (Sifford).7 He lived between 1795 and 1818 at Cabarrus County, North Carolina; "On 7 December 1794 John Adam Cruse took a land grant on the North Side of Wolf Creek in Cabarrus Co, NC. In 1818 he sold his Cabarrus land and moved to Illinois in the great land rush and movedall his family there with the exception of Philip who remained in North Carolina." Cruse Descendants Vol 1, p. 12/485.4 Adam was listed as the head of a family on the 1800 Census at Salisbury, Cabarrus County, North Carolina. Adam Cruse 3 1 0 1 0; 1 2 0 1 0; 00. The 3 males 0 thru 9 could be Jacob (1); Peter (3) and Henry (4). Philip (6) is here listed as 10-15. Adam (39) is listed as 1 male 26-44. The one female under 10 is Elizabeth (8). Sophia (10) is one female 10-15 -- who is the other one? Rosanna is the 1 female 26-44..8 He was an heir in the probate of Johann Phillip Grüss and Anna Catherina Grüss on 5 September 1805 at Rowan County, North Carolina; On 5 September 1805 Henry Cruse, Peter Eddleman (Elizabeth Cruse's husband),
John Berger (Margaretha Cruse's husband), of Rowan County, North Carolina, Adam Cruse, Andrew Cruse, George
Goodman (Susannah Cruse's husband), and Jacob Lingle (Anna Maria Cruse's husband) of Cabarrus County, North Carolina, and Elias Meyers ( Magdalena Cruse's husband) of
Berk County, North
Carolina, the heirs of Philip Cruse, conveyed his land lying on the Rowan-Cabarrus
County line.9 Adam, Rosanna, Sophia, John, Elizabeth, John, Henry, Peter, Sophia, Jacob, Samuel and John immigrated, in 1818. Destination: Union County Illinois.4 Adam Cruse witnessed the census 1820 of Peter Cruse and Catherine "Caty" Boger; Cruce, Henry 00001 000100 0001 (1 male 26-44; 1 female 16-25; 1 engaged in manufacturing)
Cruce, Peter 110201 50010 0300 (1 male 0 thru 9; 1 male 10 thru 15; 0 males 16 thru 18; 2 males 16 thru 25; 1 male 45+; 5 females 0-9; 1 female 26 thru 44; 3 engaged in agriculture)
Cruce, Adam 400301 00001 0300 (4 males 0-9; 0 males 16-18; 3 males 16 thr 25; 1 male 45+; 1 female 45+; 3 engaged in agriculture)
(also John and David Crise; John is 26 thru 44; David 16 thru 25; relatives?)
Township: All Townships
County: Union
State: Illinois
Year: 1820
Roll: M33_11
Page: 160
Image: 153
Cruce, Henry 00001 000100 0001 (1 male 26-44; 1 female 16-25; 1 engaged in manufacturing) prob Henry (2180) 24 yo and his wife Elizabeth (2182) 20 yo (could also be Henry (2173) (25 yo) and wife Mary (Polly) (2176) 20 yo.
Cruce, Peter 110201 50010 0300 (1 male 0 thru 9; 1 male 10 thru 15; 0 males 16 thru 18; 2 males 16 thru 25; 1 male 45+; 5 females 0-9; 1 female 26 thru 44; 3 engaged in agriculture) Peter (2212) 49 yo, maybe Henry's child Charles (26069) less than 1 yr?; 1 male 10-15 would be Peter (2223) 13 yo; 2 males 16 thru 25 but not 16 thru 18 would probably not be Aaron (died before 1820?) nor Peter Jr. (13 where was he?) but Moses (9098) 18 yo; and Henry (2180) 24 yo old; 5 females 0 thru 9 would be Margaret (2535) 3 yo; Leah (4941) 4 yo; Bernice (10879) 6 yo; Rachel (5875) 8 yo, plus 1 (or is this a mistake for Henry's wife?); where is Henry's wife Elizabeth (2182) 20 yo?; Catharine (6732) 40 yo would be the 1 female 26 thru 44.
Cruce, Adam 400301 00001 0300 (4 males 0-9; 0 males 16-18; 3 males 16 thr 25; 1 male 45+; 1 female 45+; 3 engaged in agriculture) Adam Cruse (2200) 58 yrs old; John (2206) 17 yo old unmarried in 1820; Samuel (2230) 18 unmarried in 1820; Jacob (2190) 21 unmarried in 1820; don't know who the 4 males 0-9 are
(also John and David Crise; John is 26 thru 44; David 16 thru 25; relatives?)10


Adam Cruse died on 5 March 1821 at Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois, at age 59; "When visiting his daughter Sophia one day in 1821, her husband, John Ury, was taking down a tree endangering the house. Adam stepped out to see how the effort was going just in time to be struck by the falling tree and killed instantly." Cruse Descendants p. 12/485.4 He was buried at Saint Johns Lutheran Cemetery, Dongola, Union County, Illinois.1 He 1790 census -- Mecklenburg County, NC 1800 Census -- Cabarrus County, NC 1820 Census -- Union County, IL John Adam took a land grant on the North side of Wolf Creek, Dec 7, 1794, in Mecklenburg (later Cabarrus) County, NC. The 1800 census names residence as Cabarrus County and in Sept 1818 he sold land in Cabarrus County, prob the 200 acres he bought there Oct 15, 1787. IN 1818 he moved his family to IL and is listed in the Union County census of 1820. He and his family were members of St. JOhn's Lutheran Ch in Union County, IL. Adam settled on a farm three miles south of Jonesboro. One day in 1821 he was visiting in the home of his daughter, Sophia Elizabeth, and son-in-law John Ury. Johy Ury was engaged in cutting down a tree that was endangering the house. Adam stepped out of the house to see which way the tree would fall, was caught under the falling tree and killed instantly. Philip Cruse appointed John Lingle, his brother-in-law as his Power of Attorney in conveyance of property as heir of 'my father, Adam Cruse.' Book 13, Mecklenburg Co NC deeds, entry 1371, p. 426 (from Ferguson Gen Deeds & Abstracts, p. 82) -- 15 Oct 1787, Jacob Pence of Mecklenburg, attorney for Adam Pence of Rockingham Co, VA to Adam Gruse, for 75 pounds lawful NC money, 200 A on Shane Wolf br of Dutch Buffalo Cr adjacent Lippar and Henry Long Wit: Joseph Shinn and Jacob Hintworth. Prbd in Jan 1788, Ct. by oath of Joseph Shinn. Sam Martin, Cmc. Book 2, Minutes of Mecklenburg Co NC Ct of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1788 Jan session - entry 182 (Ferguson, mecklenburg Co NC Minutes 1780-1800, p. 75). one from Adam Pence to Adam Cruse 200 acres dated 15 Oct 1787, [proved] by Joseph Shinn. same source, 1788 Oct session entry 221 (Ferguson, p. 81) - Grand Jury empaneled. One of them is Adam Cruise [sic].1 He was occup1 Farmer.5 He was (an unknown value.)5

Family

Rosanna Kress b. 8 Nov 1763, d. 1829
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 9/485.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Mowery,Cannon,Cruse and Pool.
  4. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 12/485.
  5. [S498] Vivian D. Virgen, Feb 2004.
  6. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Robison Beaver ancestors.
  7. [S628] James Lance, Sep 2004.
  8. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com.
  9. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 10/485.
  10. [S65] 1820 US census, online www.ancestry.com.

Rosanna Kress1

F, b. 8 November 1763, d. 1829
     Rosanna Kress was also known as Rosanna Cress.1 She was born on 8 November 1763 at Mecklenburg County, North Carolina; dau of Johann Nicholas Heinrich Kress and Catherine Eberhardt.2,3,4 She married Adam Cruse at Organ Lutheran Church, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, on 18 October 1784.4 As of 18 October 1784,her married name was Cruse.1 Rosanna was probably a free white female, age 26 and under 45, in Adam Cruse's household on the 1800 Census at Salisbury, Cabarrus County, North Carolina; Adam Cruse 3 1 0 1 0; 1 2 0 1 0; 00. The 3 males 0 thru 9 could be Jacob (1); Peter (3) and Henry (4). Philip (6) is here listed as 10-15. Adam (39) is listed as 1 male 26-44. The one female under 10 is Elizabeth (8). Sophia (10) is one female 10-15 -- who is the other one? Rosanna is the 1 female 26-44.5 Adam, Rosanna, Sophia, John, Elizabeth, John, Henry, Peter, Sophia, Jacob, Samuel and John immigrated, in 1818. Destination: Union County Illinois.4 Rosanna Kress died in 1829 at Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois; "After Adam's death, his widow, who was living with him in Illinois, signed a document at the Union Co Courthouse turning the probation of his estate over to his sons by signing her "X" where somebody identified her as "Christina." It could be possible that she used a nickname of something like "Sena" and the writer of the document took it to mean that her right name was "Christina" rather than "Rosena." A recent report was made that the wiow of Johann Adam Cruse was on the census as late as 1830, but this has not been verified. . . d about 1829 in Union Co Il." Cruse Descendants Vol 1, p. 12/485.4 She was buried at Saint Johns Lutheran Cemetery, Dongola, Union County, Illinois.4

Family

Adam Cruse b. 15 Nov 1761, d. 5 Mar 1821
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  3. [S126] Rootsweb.com, online wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Robison Beaver ancestors.
  4. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 12/485.
  5. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com.

Sophia Susan Lingle1

F, b. circa 1818, d. 1874
FatherJohn Lingle1 b. c 1789, d. 1 Mar 1833
MotherElizabeth Cruse1 b. 19 Jan 1792, d. 28 May 1835
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID 1A4F45D20BB0214391E25052AF09DC60A889. Sophia Susan Lingle was born circa 1818 at Rowan County, North Carolina; Dillow Family: "She was born about 1818 in Rowan County."1,2 She was born circa 1820 at Rowan County, North Carolina.3 As of 26 December 1841,her married name was Dillow.1 She married Abraham Dillow at Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois, on 26 December 1841.1,4,2 Sophia Susan Lingle died in 1874 at Cobden, Union County, Illinois.1,2

Family

Abraham Dillow b. 2 Jan 1812, d. 16 Dec 1879
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Read-Dillow Tree_2008-07-01.
  2. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 3 (Peter) p. 179.
  3. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1, p 17/485.
  4. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1 page 37/485.
  5. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.
  6. [S61] Genforum, online http://genforum.genealogy.com, Lingle messages 79.
  7. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1 page 38/485.

Abraham Dillow1

M, b. 2 January 1812, d. 16 December 1879
FatherPeter Dillow2 b. c 1773, d. 1855
MotherSusannah ?2 b. 1779, d. 1855
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID 3A9ECB4D5F1B34488A323A6256B0B2F2E8C4. Abraham Dillow was born on 2 January 1812 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.1,3,4 He was baptized on 2 January 1816 at Organ Church, Rowan County, North Carolina.2 He was farmer.2 Susannah, Peter, Michael, David, Samuel, Anna, Margaret, Isaac and Abraham immigrated, in 1817. Destination: an unknown place .5 He lived; N.C., Ill.2 He married Sophia Susan Lingle at Jonesboro, Union County, Illinois, on 26 December 1841.1,6,4 On 30 Mar 1844, Abraham and his brother Simeon Dillow, in c,onsideration of $1.00, and for the love and affection their parents bore them, were deeded the 160 acre of land, the SE 1/4, Sec 17, Twp12 S, R1 W, from their parents. On 1 Jun 1850, a new deed was drawn specifying that Abraham was to have the East half, and Simeon the West half. between 30 March 1844 and 1 June 1850 at Union County, Illinois.7 Abraham Dillow witnessed the Land of Monroe Dillow and Levi Dillow on 18 March 1878 at Union County, Illinois; "Following the pattern of his father, Abraham sold his land on 18 Mar 1878 to his youngest sons, Monroe Dillow and Levi Dillow, in consideration of $1.00 and the love and affection their parents bore them. Monroe and Levi each got half. They are believed to be the only sons of Abraham who lived on the land owned by their parents."7 Abraham Dillow died on 16 December 1879 at Cobden, Union County, Illinois, at age 67.8,4

Family

Sophia Susan Lingle b. c 1818, d. 1874
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Read-Dillow Tree_2008-07-01.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 3 (Peter) p. 4.
  4. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 3 (Peter) p. 179.
  5. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 30.
  6. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1 page 37/485.
  7. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Volume III, Peter, p 179.
  8. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Ancestry One World Tree.
  9. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.
  10. [S1293] Bernard William Cruse, Cruse Descendants 1985, Vol 1 page 38/485.
  11. [S43] Gary Rolph guess.

John D Dillow Sr1

M, b. 1792, d. 27 May 1845
FatherMichael Dillow2 b. c 1755, d. c 1805
Motherwife ?2 b. s 1755, d. bt 1799 - 1801
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID 627F8F7EBA7F0E41A0FE1E057590529D2B4F. John D Dillow Sr was born in 1792 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.1 He was Farmer; Blacksmith.2 John was probably a free white male, under 10 years old, in Michael Dillow's household on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; found nowhere in the federal copy of the 1800 census (I checked all 176 pages July 2007), but included (without page numbers) in Dillow family history Vl. 1, p. xxvii - "Michael Dillow Sr. Head of household 1 male 45 and over, 2 males under 10 (John and ?), 1 female 10-16 (Mary), 1 female 16-26."3 They witnessed Michael Dillow's death at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina, circa 1805. "Michael died about 1805 in Salisbury, Rowan Co NC and was probably buried in the Lower Stone Reformed Church Cem. Salisbury, Rowan Co."
"Michael died sometime between 14 Jan 1801, when he sold his land, and 2 Feb 1805, when his sons Michael Jr age 14, described by the court as being an orphan and John, age 12, were bound out as apprentices".4 John D Dillow Sr and John Shuman were "In the minutes of the Rowan Co Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, the following is found on 5 Feb 1805 - ' John Dillo, age 12 years bound to John Shuman to learn the trade of blacksmith." on 5 February 1805 at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 John D Dillow Sr was/were the ward(s) of John Miller on 9 August 1805 at Rowan County, North Carolina; "On 9 Aug 1805, John Miller was appointed guarian of John, his brother Michael, and sister Elizabeth, who is believed to have died young or failed to reach maturity."1 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1810 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina, 1 male 16-26..5 He married Susannah Dillow at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 8 November 1817.1 John D Dillow Sr lived; Rowan County, N.C; and Union County., Ill.2 As of 1820, John D Dillow Sr was also known as John Delo.6 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1820 Census. Delo, John 1 male 0-9, 1 male 16-25, 1 female 0-9, 1 female 16-25.6 Jacob Dillow mentioned John D Dillow Sr in a will on 8 March 1822 at Rowan County, North Carolina; "The composition of Michael's family came entirely from the last will and testament of his oldest son Jacob written on 8 Mar 1822. Jacob's will names his brothers and sisters as being Michael, John, Mary, Susan and Catherine. .The Jacob Dillow who purchased town property in Salisbury on August 31, 1809 made his will on March 8, 1822. "I, Jacob Dillow, of the town of Salisbury in Rowan County and State of NC (house carpenter) being of sound and perfect mind and memory, do make this my last will & testament as follows to wit-- I give to my wife Catherine Dillow all my estate real & personal during her life or widowhood but at her marriage or death, the whole of my estate to be sold, real & personal, and then to be divided as follows-- I will and bequeath one hundred dollars to Addison Allen Blackwell, son of Benjamin Blackwell--I give & bequeath to my sister Mary Dillow's two children Michael & Amy one hundred dollars and the balance of my estate to be divided equally between all my Brothers and Sisters (viz) Michael, John, Mary and Susan and Catherine. It is further my will that my wife have the use of all my Estate during her life or widowhood but is not to sell any of my real estate, nor make any unnecessary (sic) use of my personal estate but to live on it decently -- I also give & bequeath to Christy Blackwell, daughter of Benjamin Blackwell fifty dollars-- Lastly, I request my Executor to be hereafter mentioned to sell my tools on credit of three months -- I appoint my friend & factor Stephen S. Ferrand sole executor to this my last will & testament and do authorize & direct him to collect all debts due and owing to me, so soon after my death as possible and to pay all the just debts that I owe-- then my Executor to sell as much of my propery real and personal as will satisfy the debts-- and I do hereby authorize & request my Executor to Execute every part of this my last will & testament. In Witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 8th day March 1822-- Signed in the presence of Frank Earnhart (initialed) Jacob Dillow SEAL his x mark John Shuman (initialed).7 He and Peggy Dillow Not sure of name-- on my old sheet has 'Jacob (Peggy) Dillow?' She was down as a part of the John Dillow and Susan--- family, but had been crossed out. Don't know what connection there is. circa 1830.2 John D Dillow Sr died on 27 May 1845 at Dongola, Union County, Illinois; "John died 27 May 1845 in Dongola, Union Co IL and was buried in St JOhn's em, Dongola, Union Co."1 He was buried at Saint Johns Lutheran Cemetery, Dongola, Union County, Illinois.8 Sources include Mowery-Dillow Chronology and Mowery D; also letter from Konrad Dillow and letter (9-11-90) from Paul Dillow Maybe brother of Peter Dillow, Jr.(?)-- see Mowery D--don't think so, acc to Konrad Dillow From the minutes of the Rowan County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 5 February, 1805: 'John Dillow aged 12 years bound to John Shuman to learn the trade of blacksmith. Master to comply with the law.. .On Aug 9, 1805, John Miller was appointed as guardian to him, his brother Michael, and Elizabeth Dillow. John appeared in the census f 1810 as a single head of household. He never owned land in NC. On Whitsunday 1817, he was a communicant at the Organ Church, along with his brother Michael and his sister Mary. . . marriage bonds of record in Rowan County. . .John Dillow. .Susey Dillow. .Nov. 17, 1817. .Peter x Earnhart [&] John Giles, Bondsman & Witness.' in [Konrad Dillow], Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow: A History of the North Carolina Dillow Line [n.p; n.d.]. From Konrad Dillow: John is believed to have come to UCI, with his wife and infant son Paul, in the summer or early fall of 1818. He settled on land adjoining that of this brother Michael and established what is believed to be the 4th Dillow home in UCI. John acquired a total of 280 acres of land, in three contiguous tracts, all of them located in T13S R1W: E1/2 NW1/4 Sec 34, (80 acres), from the federal domain, on Jan. 10, 1819; SW1/4 Sec 27 (160 acres), from Bradshaw & Grammar, on Oct 9, 1823; and SW1/4 SE1/4 Sec 27 (40 acres), from the federal domain, on Sept. 9, 1833. The homestead was located in Section 34. Parts of the land remained in the ownership of John's descendants until May 4, 1955 when the last parcel was sold to William Dillow, a descendant of John's uncle Jacob Dillow (1759-1826). Tradition has it that this family possessed a distinct musical capability. John d intestate and his estate was administered by his two oldest sons Paul and Jacob. Probate papers include a detailed list of items sold at pubic auction. Public sales in rural areas were for a long time occasions for neighbors to visit, gossip, catch up on neighborhood news, and pick up an occasional bargain. John was evidently a prosperous farmer. His livestock in 1839 included 7 horses and 20 cows. He ran a blacksmith shop as well, since his estate papers include a long list of acounts due him for 'smithing.' These accounts were classified as 'good' and 'desperate.' It is of interest to note that John's burial shroud cost 62 1/2 cents, and that the widow's dower included two sets of fine dogs. The list of property sold included the name of the buyer, the article sold, and the sale price. Items of interest were sheep, hogs, cattle, horses, farm implements, wheat, flax, a scythe, cradle, saddle bags, trumpet, a Bible, jugs, bottles, and a clock. Three of the children of John and Susannah Dillow (Paul, Kate, and Margaret) m. 3 of the 15 children of Henry & Susannah Freeze Mowery. Letter of Paul Dillow (9-11-90): 'I find the Dillow-Mowery connection fascinating. Note that Henry Mowery had 4 children who married 5 Dillow children. Incidently, George who secondly married Catherine (Hoffner) Sowers married another Dillow descendant. She is from the Mary Dillo -John Adam Powlas family. There could be others-- I am not sure. And, this connection did not stop-- it has continued all down through the generations. These people have genuinely liked each other, or have been desperate for someone to marry. Ha! From letter of Paul Dillow (9-11-90): 'You will note that the Dillow family was very hard hit by the Civil War-- your Susannah and John also lost 2 sons--Jacob and John, Jr. There are yet others-- some were lucky enough to return to the area-- many with permanent disabilities.' 'Bibliography: Public Records. 1: Illinois County Records (birth, death, marriage, land and probate records). Records in the following counties have been consulted: Alexander, Jackson, Johnson, Massac, Macon, Platt, Pulaski, Union, Williamson. nion County Records have been the ones most intensively used. 2. Illinis State Archives. Springfield, IL. 3. Missouri County Records. Cape Girardeau County (for marriages). 4. U.S. Archives, Washington, D.C. (military records). 5. U.S. Census 1790-1910. Books and Printed Materials: 1. Leo J. Brown, writer and compiler. The Brown Family- Ancestors and Descendants of William Orrel Brown, the Educator, 1986. 2. John Burgess Fisher et al, compiler and editor. Ancestors and Descendants of Abraham Brown, the Miller, and Jacob Brown, the Wagonmaker. Charlotte, NC, 1983; 3. Ernest H. Jackson, compiler, Marriages of Union County, IL 1818-1880. Heritage House, Thomson, IL, 1977; 4. Paul Lentz, collator and publisher, Lentz Heritage Records, Burlington, NC, 1986; 5. Macon County Marriage Records. Decatur, IL Genealogical Society, 1967; 6. Geraldine T. Miller, ed., Wendell Miller and His Descendants. Salisbury, NC, 1985; 7. Jessie B. Morgan, The Good Life in Piatt County. Moline, IL, 1968. 8. Wm. H. Perrin, editor. History of Alexander, Union and Pulaski Counties, Reprinted by Genealogy Society of S IL, 1987; Piatt County Ilinois Marriage Records 1841-1853, and Cemetery Records. Urbana, IL 1962; 10. Emma C. Piatt, History of Piatt County, Chicago, 1883.' [Konrad Dillow], Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow: A History of the North Carolina Dillow Line [n.p; n.d.], ch. 2, p. 84.2 He was Lutheran.2 He wias mentioned as deceased in the land and Estate Transaction of Daniel Mowery and Catherine Dillow between 1851 and 1855 at Alexander County, Illinois; "Upon the death of Catherine's father in 1845, she inherited $58.48 from his estate, which may have been used to purchase 80 acres SE 1/4 SE 1/4 and RW 1/4 SE 1/4 Sec 9 Twp 14S R1W from Dewalt Miller on 10 Mar 1850 for $400.00. In about 1851, Daniel moved his family across Mill Creek to their new home in Alexander Co IL. On 13 Dec 1854 Daniel patented 80 acres from the government, at which time he made his first payment of $100.00. This land, SW 1/4 SE 1/4 40 acres, and SE 1/4 40 acres, both in Sec 9, Twp 14S, R1W, was worth $240.00 at his death. The 1855 census of Alexander Co IL reveals Daniel owned livestock worth $200.00 and had 18 pounds of wool."9

Family

Susannah Dillow b. Mar 1795, d. 21 Jul 1853
Children

Citations

  1. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 165.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. xxvii.
  4. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 1.
  5. [S64] 1810 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1810 United States Federal Census
    about John Dillo
    Name:
    John Dillo

    Township:
    Carolina

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

  6. [S65] 1820 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Delo Township: Not Stated County: Union State: Illinois Year: 1820 Roll: M33_11 Page: 161 Image Number: 154
    ]
  7. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. 2.
  8. [S596] Linda Lamonte Knopke, July 2004; uploaded May 2004, sources available upon email request e-mail address.
  9. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 205.

Susannah Dillow1

F, b. March 1795, d. 21 July 1853
FatherJacob Dillow1 b. 1757, d. c 1826
MotherSusannah Shuman1 b. 1775, d. 1839
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID B71D7B9130A8A844A8BA8F83867F16ED2093. Her married name was Dillow. Susannah Dillow also went by the name of Susie. She was born in March 1795 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.1 She was 7 children.1 Elizabeth and Susannah was probably a free white female, age 10 and under 16, in Jacob Dillow's household on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Jacob Dillow 1 male 0-9 (Peter); 1 male 25-44; 3 females 10-15 (probably mistake for 3 female 0-9 - Elizabeth 7, Susannah 5, and an unknown female); 1 female 25-44 (wife Susannah.)2 Elizabeth and Susannah was probably a free white female, age 16 and under 26, in Jacob Dillow's household on the 1810 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; same page as Peter but 7 familes down; Jacob Dillo 3 males under 10; 2 males 10-16; 1 male 45 and over; 2 females 16-26; 1 female 45 & over (Susannah.)3 She married John D Dillow Sr at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 8 November 1817.4 Susannah Dillow lived; Rowan County., N.C; Union County., Ill.1 Susannah was probably a free white female, age 16 and under 26, in John D Dillow Sr's household, on the 1820 Census; Delo, John 1 male 0-9, 1 male 16-25, 1 female 0-9, 1 female 16-25.5 Susannah Dillow After the death of John Dillow, his wife Susannah maintained the household for herself and unmarried children until her death in 1853. . .Susannah also died intestate. Her estate was administered by her son Jacob. The probate file included a public auction sales list. - Konrad Dillow. . between 1845 and 1853.1 Susannah was listed as the head of a family on the 1850 Census at West Part of District 2, Union County, Illinois. 629 629 Sophia [sic] Dillow 56 female $300 NC; John 17 male farmer IL attended school within year; Susannah 13 female IL attended school within year.6 She died on 21 July 1853 at Dongola, Union County, Illinois, at age 58; "Susannah died 21 Jul 1853 in Dongola, Union Co IL and was buried in St Johns Cem Dongola, Union Co."4 She was buried at Saint Johns Lutheran Cemetery, Dongola, Union County, Illinois.7 She was German Reformed.1

Family

John D Dillow Sr b. 1792, d. 27 May 1845
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Jacob Dillow
    Name:
    Dillow, Jacob

    Township:
    Salisbury

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

  3. [S64] 1810 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1810 United States Federal Census
    about Peter Delow
    Name:
    Peter Delow

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.
  4. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 165.
  5. [S65] 1820 US census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: John Delo Township: Not Stated County: Union State: Illinois Year: 1820 Roll: M33_11 Page: 161 Image Number: 154
    ]
  6. [S41] 1850 census on Ancestry, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Sophia Dillow
    Age: 56
    Estimated birth year: abt 1794
    Birth place: North Carolina
    Gender: Female
    Home in 1850
    (City,County,State): District 2, Union, Illinois
    Page: 188
    Roll: M432_130.
  7. [S596] Linda Lamonte Knopke, July 2004; uploaded May 2004, sources available upon email request e-mail address.

Michael Dillow1

M, b. circa 1755, d. circa 1805
FatherMichael Hartman Dillow1 b. c 1730, d. 1805
MotherAnna Margareth Holtzhauser1 b. 11 Apr 1737, d. 1812
     Michael Dillow was born circa 1755 at Pennsylvania; "Michael Dilow Sr. was born about 1755 in PA." p. 1.2 Michael, Anna, Michael, Jacob, Hannah, Mary and Margaret immigrated, between 1769 and 1771. Destination: an unknown place .2 He married wife ? at Rowan County, North Carolina, circa 1774.3 Michael Dillow lived between 1774 and 1805 at North Carolina.1 Michael was listed as the head of a family on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina. Michael Dillo 1 2 4 (1 male 16+, 2 males 16-, 4 females); on page 13 of 27, about 10 pages before his brother Jacob and father Michael. Michael would be the 1 male 16+, Jacob and Michael the males 16-, and wife Michael, daughters Mary, Catherine, and Susan as the 4 females..4 They witnessed wife ?'s death at Rowan County, North Carolina, between 1799 and 1801. "Michael's wife died after the birth of Elizabeth in Sep of 1798, and before 14 Jan 1801, for no wife signed when Michael sold his land to John Kirk.".2 Michael was listed as the head of a family on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina. Found nowhere in the federal copy of the 1800 census (I checked all 176 pages July 2007), but included (without page numbers) in Dillow family history Vl. 1, p. xxvii - "Michael Dillow Sr. Head of household 1 male 45 and over, 2 males under 10 (John and ?), 1 female 10-16 (Mary), 1 female 16-26".5 Michael died circa 1805 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina. "Michael died about 1805 in Salisbury, Rowan Co NC and was probably buried in the Lower Stone Reformed Church Cem. Salisbury, Rowan Co."
"Michael died sometime between 14 Jan 1801, when he sold his land, and 2 Feb 1805, when his sons Michael Jr age 14, described by the court as being an orphan and John, age 12, were bound out as apprentices".2 He was buried at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 He From Konrad Dillow: Michael Dillow was b in Pa, prob c the mid-1750's. Nothing is known of his marriage place or date, or even the name of his wife. On Oct. 27, 1786, he purchased 400 acres of land in Rowan County, on the west side of the Yadkin River, from William Lambert, who had been granted the land by the state on Nov. 4, 1784. He sold this land to John Kirk for 200 pounds on Jan. 14, 1801, no wife signing. He d, presumably in Rowan County, sometime between the sale of the land in 1801 and Feb. 5, 1805, when his sons John (age 12) and Michael (age 14) were bound out as apprentices. At this time the court described Michael as an 'orphan.' It was likely he (not his father MHD), who served as bondsman for MHD's three daughters, at their marriages, between 1785 and 1791. He also served as bondsman for Lillian Earnhart and Betsy Kiker on July 26, 1816. It was likely he who was appoiinted Constable in Capt. Fullenwider's Company on May 8, 1788, and overseer of the road from Fisher's Ferry to Berger's forks of the road, on Aug. 8, 1794. Our knowledge of the composition of his family comes entirely from the will left by his oldest son Jacob on Mar. 8, 1822. see Part One, page 15. CHILDREN: Jacob, b. c 1775; Mary; Susan; Catherine; Michael, b c 1790; John, b c 1792. Birthdates for Mary, Susan, and Catherine are quite conjectural. 1790 census, Salisbury District, Rowan County, N.C. (p. 173) Dillo, Michael -- 1 male 16 upwards; 2 males under 16; 4 females Dillo, Michael -- 1 male 16 upwards, 1 male under 16, 4 females Dillow Land Transactions (abstracted from the McCubbins Collection in the Salisbury Public Library) Deed Book 11, page 264: October 27, 1786 - William Lambert of Wilkes County, Georgia lets Michael Delio of Rowan County have 400 acres West Side of Yadkin River next John Lambert and John Reed. Proved May 1787 by Mat. Varner. (This is believed to be Michael Dillow, eldest son of MHD. He sold the same tract on Jan. 14, 1801.) Book 17, page 548: Jan 14, 1801 - Michael Dellow of Rowan County, NC - no wife signs- let John Kirk of Montgomery Co NC have 400 acres on west side of Yadkin River next John Lambert & John Reed, for 200 pounds, witnessed by Noah Reed, Buck Kimbell & Richard Parker & proved by lat named in Feb 1801. (This land had been granted to William Lambert by the state on Nov. 14, 1784).. . .It is noted that Michael Dillow, eldest son of MHD, acted as bondsman in Rowan County for Lillian Earnhart and Betsy Kiker on July 26, 1816.' Source: Konrad Dillow, Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow, Chap. 1, Page 1 The Michael Dillow who acted as bondsman in Rowan County for Lillian Earnhart and Betsy Kiker on 26 July 1816 was prob not this Michael Dillow, as his two sons are called 'orphans' in 1805.1 He was German Reformed.1

Family

wife ? b. s 1755, d. bt 1799 - 1801
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 1.
  3. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. 1.
  4. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1790 United States Federal Census
    about Michael Dillo
    Name:
    Michael Dillo

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.
  5. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. xxvii.

wife ?1

F, b. say 1755, d. between 1799 and 1801
     Wife ? was born say 1755 at Pennsylvania.1 She married Michael Dillow at Rowan County, North Carolina, circa 1774.2 As of 1774,her married name was Dillow.1 Her married name was Mrs Michael Dillow.1 Wife ? lived; NC.1 Wife, Mary, Catherine and Susan was probably a free white female in Michael Dillow's household on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Michael Dillo 1 2 4 (1 male 16+, 2 males 16-, 4 females); on page 13 of 27, about 10 pages before his brother Jacob and father Michael. Michael would be the 1 male 16+, Jacob and Michael the males 16-, and wife Michael, daughters Mary, Catherine, and Susan as the 4 females.3 Wife died between 1799 and 1801 at Rowan County, North Carolina. "Michael's wife died after the birth of Elizabeth in Sep of 1798, and before 14 Jan 1801, for no wife signed when Michael sold his land to John Kirk.".4 She was German Reformed.1

Family

Michael Dillow b. c 1755, d. c 1805
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. 1.
  3. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1790 United States Federal Census
    about Michael Dillo
    Name:
    Michael Dillo

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.
  4. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 1.

Michael Hartman Dillow1

M, b. circa 1730, d. 1805
     Michael Hartman Dillow was born circa 1730 at Germany; From the above facts and from other circumstantial evidence, it is believed that Michael Hartman was born in Germany in about 1730, and was married about 1754 in Pennsylvania.2 He was farmer, locksmith and landowner.1 He married Anna Margareth Holtzhauser at Pennsylvania in 1754.1 Michael Hartman Dillow lived; Germany, PA, NC.1 Michael Hartman Dillow (Dillo) was born in Palatine Providence, Germany about 1730. 13 Michael Hartman Dillow gave his oath of allegiance to the King of England in Philadelphia, which was required of all male immigrants 16 years old and older, on 22 March 1761. He gave Northampton County as his residence. 13 (I was given this invormation by another researcher. At this time, I have not been able to verify the accuracy of this information provided by Tommy Roger Dillow. Hopefully, I will be able to do it soon.)

This follows the fact that Pierre Delon 1696 brought with him a son to PA named Michael who was born in 1726.

Because of any information that I have been able to find to the contrary, I, personally, believe that Michael Delon, son of Pierre Delon AKA Peter Dillo who arrived on the ship "Princess Augusta" in 1736 is the same Michel who left records in PA up until the early 1700's, and then disappeared from the PA records.3 Michael Hartman Dillow and an unknown person took the oath of allegiance on 22 March 1761 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; He was in Philadelphia 22 Mar 1761, when he took the Oath of Allegiance to the British Crown (Pennsylvania was then a colony of England), at which time he gave his place of residence as Northampton County. This oath was taken by foreigners who had been in the colony for over seven years and wished to become a British citizen - p. xix.2 ON 7 Oct 1761, Micvhael Hartman obtained a patent for 72 acres and 84 perches of land in Lower Milford Township, Northampton County. This patent was issued by the Properieters of Pennsylvania, Thomas and Richard Penn. The texct of the patent described Michael Hartman as being a locksmith. In 1761, he paid 9 pounds in taxes in Upper Milford Township and on 10 Aug 1764 he contributed 2 shilings and 6 pene toa fund drive for the bennefit of the Skippack Evengelical Reformed Congregation. No further trace of Michael Hartman has been found in Pennsylvania. on 7 October 1761 at Lower Milford Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania.2 Michael, Anna, Michael, Jacob, Hannah, Mary and Margaret immigrated, between 1769 and 1771. Destination: an unknown place .4 Michael Hartman Dillow Info. from Konrad Dillow, based on land deed of Jan 17, 1772; later land transactions; and his will, dated Nov. 9, 1797. MHD sold 1/3 of his 589 acres of land to Henry Fullenwider and another 1/3 to his son Jacob. The remaining 1/3 was willed to his son Peter. In letter of 28 Aug 1990 (see Dillow family file), Mr. Dillow wrote: Michael Hartman Dillow. . .was a German and became a naturalized British citizen in Philadelphia in 1751. He was in NC by 1772, as shown by a land deed. Certainly the Mowerys, Lentzes, Dillows, were in Pa and NC at the same time, most likely the Cruses also. Many many of those German families of PA and NC (like Holshouser, Rendelman, Hileman, Lingle, Clutts, Eddleman etc) came to Union County, Ill. All, or at least most of them, belonged to that first wave (there were many later waves) of German migration to America, (about 1710-1750) from the Palatine (middle Rhine) area of Germany. Many (including the Dillows and Mowerys) were still speaking a type of German 'Pennsylvania Dutch' when they came to Illinois. A usual route was to the Philadelphia area of PA, to Rowan County of NC (usually via The Great Wagon Road), to Union County, IL (around 1818 and later). It is believed the Dillows and perhaps many others, were French Hugenots before they were Germans. As you know, the Hugenots went every which way upon the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 by Louis XIV. We believe the Dillows became Germans soon after that time. . . .there wasn't much of anybody left in NC by the name of Dillow after descendants of MHD went to IL in 1817-18. Paul Dillow (letter of 9-11-90) writes: 'While Jacob and Peter are the only children of Michael Hartman who came to Illinois, there are descendants of the other children who came also.' ' It seems probable that the Dillows were one of many Protestant (Huguenot) families that had to leave Catholic France, for religious reasons, in the late 17th century. It is almlost certain that they came to Pennsylvania, from the Palatine (mid Rhine) area of Germany, as part of the Palatine migration, probably between 1730 and 1750. It is fully certain that, with many others, they made their way from Pennsylvania to Rowan County, North Carolina, by 1772. Likewise, it is clear that the Dillows caught the 'frontier fever' in 1817-1818 and came to Union County, Illinois. . . . The earliest known member of the North Carolina line was Michael Hartman Dillow, of Northampton County, Pennsylvania, located north of Philadelphia. His parentage is not documented, but we know the following facts about him while he lived in Pennsylvania. Records of the New Goshenhoppen Reformed Lutheran Church, located in Upper Hanover Township of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania show that on November 4, 1759 Jacob Dillo, son of MHD and Anna Margaretha Dillo, was baptised, witnesses being J. Jacob Holtzhauser and Anna Marg. Redman. On March 22, 1761 MHD took the oath of allegiance at Philadelphia. Northampton County was given as his place of residence at that time. The oath was taken by foreigners who had been in the colony for over seven years and wished to become British citizens. On October 7, 1761, MHD obtained a patent for 72 acres and 84 perches of land in Lower Milford Township, Northampton County. This patent was issued by the then proprieters of the Province of Pennsylvania, Thomas and Richard Penn. The text of this patent described MHD as a locksmith. Bernhard Pisbing had taken out a warrant for this tract of land on August 4, 1749. In 1762 MHD paid 9 pounds in taxes in Upper Milford Township. On July 30, 1761, MHD and his wife sponsored the baptism of Anna Margaretha Cunius, daughter of J. & Catharina Ellisa Cunius in the New Goshenhoppen Church. ON August 10, 1764 MHD contributed 2 shillings and 6 pence to a fund drive for the benefit of the Skippack Evangelical Reformed Congregation. No further records on MHD have been found in Pennsylvania.' . . .From the above facts and from other circumstantial evidence, it is believed that MHD was born about 1730, probably in the Palatine (Middle Rhine) area of Germany, and that he was married in Pennsylvania about 1755. . .MHD reappeared in Rown County, North Carolina, Salisbury District, in 1772. He is believed to have died there about 1800. IN 1817-18, most of his male descendants migrated to Union County, IL, which has been the heart and center of the North Carolina Dillow line since that time. . .William Perrin, editor of History of Alexander, Union, and Pulaski Cties, IL (1883) states that the grandfather of David Dillow (who was MHD) was born in Germany. . . .The last trace of MHD in Pennsylvania was in August of 1764. In January 1772 he reappeared in Rowan County North Carolina as the owner of 589 acres of land along Dutch Second Creek, some 10-15 miles southeast of Salisbury. So far as we know, MHD's family was the only Dillow family in Rowan County at the time. We can not be certain of that, however, for we will come upon Dillw not yet identified with MHD's immediate family. . . .The first setlers of Rowan County were Irish, Scoth-Irish, and English who came principally from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and Virginia. By the 1760's, however, German settlers from Pennsylvania became and remained a significant part of the Northwest North Carolina frontier, chiefly near the fork of the Yadkin River and along Second Creek. MHD's 'plantation' as he called it in his will, lay in this area. . . Why did Germans of Eastern Pennsylvania come to North Carolina? It is said that they had received favorable reports on the sale and distribution of extensive grants belonging to the British Lord Granville and that the cost of consumer goods in Pennsylvania ahd become very high. By what route did they make the journey of some 435 miles from Philadelphia to the Salisbury area? Doubtless most of them came by way of the GREAT WAGON ROAD, sometkmes described as running from Philadelphia to Frederick (Maryland), thence to Warrentown and the courthouse in Ameille (Virginia) and on to Rowan County. A more frequently used route, however, ran to Gettysburg, then to Winchester (Virginia) and down the Shenandoah Valley. . .That migrants did not take up residence in the Shenandoah Valley is explained by the fact that most choice land in the valley was already taken up and that the danger of Indian harrassment still existed. German immigrants usually left Pennsylvania just after the fall harvest, in order to have time to build and to plant crops before the coming season. They became a minority in a frontier agricultural society where the main crops were indigo, wheat, barley, corn, rye, hops, and seisel. Ther Germans are said to have spoken a language not generally familiar to English-speaking inhabitants who managed civil affairs, i.e. clerks, tax assessors, justices, and other public officials. They remained loyal to their own language and customs, possessed skill in industiral arts and agriculture, and were generally disinclined to take part in politics. They reputedly ventured out but little into the English-speaking areas and generally conducted their legal affairs among themselves. Speech differences with the English-speaking areas and generally conducted their legal affairs among themselves. Speech differences with the English-speaking population are said to hae persisted up to the Civil WAr The Germans of rowan County were devout, God-fearing people, affiliated generally with either the Lutheran or German Reformed churches. These congregations in Rowan County were said to have first built a church for their joint use on the land of a Mr. Fullenwider. Later, about 1757, Hickory Church was built , some three miles east of the present site of Rockwell. Still later, both the Lutheran and German Reformed congregations built log structures which in turn were superseded by Organ Curch, erected by the Lutherans and first used about 1784, and Lowerstone Church, finished by the German Reformed congregation about 1795. The Germans obtained their own pastors, books,a nd teachers from Germany. It is said that the first English language sermon came from a German church in Rowan County was delivered in 1787. . .Today, Organ and Lowerstone Churches are sturdy stone structures. They ahe been generally restored to their original form and are tourist showplaces. The continuity of these churches with early Lutheran churches of Union County, Illinois, is illlustrated by the Rev. Daniel Scherer who later served St. John's and Casper Churches. . . .the two most significant items to be found in North Carolina are the land deed and the will of MHD. MHD was the third private owner of 589 acres of land, granted by Charles II of England to Lord Earl Granville. DEED BOOK 7, PAGE 399 ROWAN COUNTY NORTH CAROLINA This indenture mae the seventeenth day of January in the year of our Lord one Thousand seven Hundred and seventy two Between Coonrod Strader of Gifford County in the province of North Carolina of the one part, and Michael Hartman Dillow of Rowan County in the province of North Carolina aforesd of the second part. Witneseth that for & in consideration of the sum of one Hundred & seventy two pounds proclimation money of North Carolina afforsd by the sd Michael Hartman Dillow to the sd Coonrod Strader in hand paid, The receipt whereof the sd Coonrod Strader Doth hereby fully acknowledge & himself therewith fully Satisfyed, contented & payed Hath given, granted, Bargained & sold & by these presents Doth give, grant, Bargain, & sell unto the sd Michael Hartman Dillow his heirs & assigns a certain piece or parcel of Land Lying & Being in Rowan County on Both sides of Second Creek and both sides of Davis's Branch Beginning at a post oak on the North side of the sd Branch, Runs thence S 62 Ch to an ash Richard Morby corner & Jacob Fulwidewr's Line, thence allong Morby's line W 95 Ch to a Hickory Thence No 62 Ch to a Hickory Thence to the Beginning containing Five Hundred & Eighty Nine Acres of Land, be the same more or less it being the same Land granted to Henry Grub by a Deed from Earl Granville Dated the 4th day of April 1761 & by the sd Henry Grub sold unto the sd Coonrod Strader by an Indenture Bearing Date the 29th day of May 1769 which Deeds are recorded & Registered in the proper offices agreeable to an act of Assembly in such case made Provided to Have & to hold the affsd Five Hundred & Eighty Nine Acres of Land with the appurtenances & all Rights, Privileges, and Improvements to the same in any wise Belonging to him and sd Michael Hartman Dillow his Heirs & assigns forever & the sd Coorod Strader for himself, heirs, & assigns doth hereby covenant & agree to & with this. Michael Hartman Dillow his Heirs & assigns that he the sd Michael Hartman Dillow his heirs & assigns shall & may forever hereafter proudly & Quietly Have, Hold, Occupy, Possess & enjoy the aforegranted Lands & premises, without the least molestation of any person Whatsoever the Quitt rents now due & hereafter to become due only & accepted all & Foreprised & other. Coonrad Strader doth oblidge Himself, Heirs, Easors, & Adm to warrant & Defend the afore granted Land & promises to Him the said Michael Hartman Dillow his Heirs and assigns forever against the claim of all persons & whatsoever. In Witness wherof the sd Coonrod Strader hath Hereunto sett his Hand & affixed his seal the Day and Date first above Written. Coonrod Strader SEAL Signed Sealed & Delivered George Henry Berger, Lonvic Launitz, Arthur Grier. North Carolina, Rowan County. This is to certify that the within Deed was duly prooved in open Court & Recorded in the clks ofice. According to Law Lett it be Registered. John Prohock Clk. (Note: Margaret Strader signs with x signifying her agreement and relinquishment of all claims). WILL OF MICHAEL HARTMAN DILLOW (Original in NC State Archives, Raleigh, N.C.) In the name of God, Amen. I Michael Hartman Dillow sen. of the County of Rowan & State of North Carolina, being in Health of body thro age very infirm of body and almost deaf and blind, but of sound mind & memory, thanks to God for it & all other of His mercies, and calling to mind the mortality of my body & that it is appointed unto all men once to die do make & ordain this my last will and testament- that is to say principally & first of all I give & recommend by soul into the hands of the Almighty God who gave it and my body to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial nothing doubting but I shall receive the same again at the General Resurrection thro the mighty power of God & as touching the worldly goods it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Margaret her bedd and furniture, one cow her choice of my flock, my chest, one colt of last spring, one iron pott, and her residence in my present dwelling house during her life and a yearly allowance of ten bushels of good wheat and ten bushels of Indian corn, one hundred and fifty pounds of good pork, and one hundred pounds of good beef, one half of the garden. She shall have liberty of stabling her cattle and liberty to raise cattle but not to exceed the number of three head, she shall also have liberty of the milkhouse, bake oven & other necessary conveniences and the apple tree and one pear tree and shall make her choice each year, she shall hae a portion of ground plowed & prepared for her for cotton potatoes & c and her cattle shall be maintained well & sufficiently in summer & in winter, these yearly allowances shall be given unto her and the afores. services performed by my son Peter in consequence of his enjoying my land, he shall also provide for her a sufficiency of fire wood, and carry her grain unto the mill & her home and shall take care of her in sickness & it is also to be observed that my son Peter (or in case of his death) his heirs, exec(utors), adm(inistrators), shall perform every of the above services and deliver the yearly allowance unto my wife Margaret at any time or times she may reasonably require them. Item, I give and bequeath unto my son Michael one shilling &do ratify and confirm unto him all former gifts. Item, I give & bequeath unto my son Jacob one shiling & do hereby ratify & confirm unto him all former gifts. Item, I give & devise unto my son Peter my plantation of land whereon I now live with every of its appurtenances to him his heirs & assigns forever- in consideration of which he shall support & maintain his mother in manner as above mentioned, also I give and bequeath unto my son Peter a certain horse which hath already been named unto him, also one plough & single trees with other tacklings. . .one harrow & gears for two horses, and I do hereby ratify and confirm unto him all former gifts. Item - I give & bequeath unto my daughter Hannah a dower equal to tha wih her other sisters hath received when married. The residue of my goods & chattles (after the distribution of the above legacies) shall be sold at publick vendue & the monies arrising therefrom shall be divided as follows, viz (after the payment of all debt and the discharge of my funeral expenses) my wife Margaret shall have one third of the suplus, the residue shall be divided among my children sons & daughters to share alike or in case of the death of any of my hidren before the divide be made, eher of my body of such dec'd shall enjoy a father or mother's share as the case may be. And I do hereby constitute appoint my well beloved wife Margaret & my son in law Jacob Lyerly Executors this my last will and Testament by whom all my debts shall be paid & the legacies herein mentioned distributed, agreeable to the tenor of this my last will and Testament And I do hereby revoke make void and disannul all former wills, ratifyng & declaring this & no other to be my lat will & Testament. In witness wherof I hae set my hand and seal ths ninth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & ninety seven. (Signed by Michael Hartman Dillow and witnessed by Nick Ruter, Jacob Holshouser, and three persons whose signatures are not legible. One of these appears to be that of Michael Dillow, MHD's eldest son. . . abstracts of deeds involving Dillow Land transactions (from the McCubbins Collection in the Salisbury Public Library): Book 11, page 442: May 2, 1788- Michael Hartman Dillo and wife Ann Margaret let Henry Fulwider (sic) (all of Rowan Co., NC), ahve 196 acres on the waters of Davis's Branch on both sides of Dutch Second Creek, beginning on the north side of Davis's Branch on the corner of the original tract, at a post oak, going south, crossing said Branch and said Creek in all 67 chains and 70 links to a hickory on the corner of Jacob Dillow, north 33 chains and 50 links to a small white oak east 10 chains to a small black oak north 33 chains and 5 links to a stake in the old line, then east to the beginning for 200 pounds wit. by Christopher Bernard and Jacob Dillow and proved by the latter in May Court 1788 (The deed was recorded May 10. This is one third of the 589 acres owned by MHD. Jacob Dillow was MHD's second son. See MHD will. Book 11, page 444: May 2, 1788- Michael Hartman Dillo and wife Ann Margaret (probably Germans) let Jacob Dillow of Rowan Co., NC have 196 acres on the waters of Dutch Second Creek, beginning on the corner of Henry Fullwider (sic) at a hickory on the line of the old tract, going north 53 chains and 50 links to a stake in the old line, west with the old line 36 chains and 50 links to a large rock on the north side of Davis's Branch, south crossing the old tract, 67 chains to a stake near a large black oak and a small Spanish oak on a road, then east to the beginning for 100 pounds, witnessed by Christopher Bernhard & Henry Fullenwider and proved by the later in May 1788. (This land, sold by MHD to his son Jacob, was one third of the 589 acres he purchased in 1772. The remaining third of MHD's land was the portion of the land willed to his son Peter in 1797). . . .5. Other Probate Matters. . .Item #2. Minutes of the Court of Please and Quarter Sessions, Rowan County, NC Aug 10, 1791: Hannah Dillow and Henry Davis were bound in the sum of twenty pounds to administer the estate of Michael Dillow, deceased, within a period of ninety days. The Archives of NC at Raleigh add nothing to the above but do identify Hannah as Michael's wife, and specifies November 9, 1791 as the date on which the court proceedings give an account of the sale of Michael's estate. The writer has not been able to identify this Michael Dillow.. . .Dillow entries in Church Records: LOWERSTONE: Margaret, daughter of John Dillow, last of February 1795. The writer has failed to identify either Margaret or John. . .7. Aprenticeship and Guardianship Cases: From the Minutes of the Rowan County Court of Please and Quarter Sessions the following cases are noted: November 10, 1797: 'John Dillo, a base born child, bound to William Emler to learn the cooper's trade the boy being 13 years and two months old till he attain the age oftwetyone years the master to comply with the Act of Assembly.' MHD's will was dated November 9, 1797. In 1790, census data show one male under 16 in MHD's household. It seems unlikely hat this was MHD's child. John was perhaps a son of one of MHD's daughters. William Embler was a plantation owner with an extensive acreage.. .In the Minutes of the Rowan County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, members of the MHD family are mentioned from time to time. IN 1778, Michael Dillow (probably MHD) paid taxes in Rowan County, Captain Berger's district. On May 10, 1788, Michael Dillow (MHD or son Michael) was appointed Constable in Captain Fullenwider's Company. On August 8, 1794, Michael Delo was appointed overseer of the road from Fisher's Ferry to Berger's Forks of the road. Other Dillow (Peter and John) were requested to oversee or do road work, on one or more occasions. IN a number of cases Dillows helped land purchasers 'prove' their purchases. Several civil suits, without details as to substance, involved Michael Dillow (father or son). Both grand and petit jury duty for Jacob Dillow are noted in several instances. Not all volumes of the minutes have been indexed. Though all volumes have been examined, a careful combing may very well turn up other instances of services similar to those cited above. MHD's family and those of his children and grandchildren are to be found in the U.S. Census for Rowan County, Salisbury District, for 1790, 1800, 1810, and 1820. In 1820 MHD's grandson Jaacob (died 1822) was the only Dillow carried in the census. After Jacob's death, his widow Catherine was the only Dillow carried 1830-1860. In 1790 three heads of household are found in the census: Jacob (single, 1 person); MHD (6 persons); and Michael (presumably the Michael who died in 1791, 7 persons). In 1800 two heads of household: Jacob (son of MHD, 6 persons); and Peter, Jacob's brother (6 persons). In 1810 three heads of household: Jacob (6 persons); John son of Jacob who died 1822 (single; 1 person); Peter Jacob's brother and John's uncle (7 persons). . .MHD and his wife Margaret are carried in 1800 in Peter's household; in 1810, only one older person, a female and most likely Margaret, is carried with Peter. MHD apparently died between census time in 1800 and census time in 1810. From court minutes we know that Margaret died in 1812. . . [Sources cited in Dillow's Bibliographies to Chapters 1 & 2]: Brawley, James S. The Rowan Story 1753-1953, A Narrative History of Rowan County, NC (Salisbury, NC, 1953); Crumrine, Boyd. History of Washington County, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, 1882); Delo, David M. DELO (Uncopyrighted about 1970); Delo, Frank S. The Delos, An American Family (Lincoln, NE, 1946). Dillow, George MD. On the Medieval Records Leading to Dillon, Dillow, and Dillwyn (Uncopyrighted about 1915). Ervin, Samuel J., Jr; A Colonial History of Rowan County (Chapel Hill, NC, 1917) Forrest, EArle, History of Lehigh County, Pennsylvania (Chicago, 1926); Hammer, Carl, Jr., Rhinelanders on the Yadkin (Rowan Printing Co, 1943); Kincaid, Robert L., The Wilderness Road (Middleboro, KY, 1973); Naturalization of Foreign Protestants in the American and West Indian Colonies (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1954); North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC (for marriage bans, wills, and complete Minutes of the Rowan County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions) Pennsylvania Public Records: Bucks County, Doylestown, PA (for wills, land deeds); Lehigh County, Allentown, PA (for wills, land deeds); Montgomery County, Norristown, PA (for records of Great Swamp and New and Old Goshenhoppen Churches); Northampton County, Easton, PA (for wills, land deeds); State Archives, Harrisburg, PA (for land warrants, patents); Perrin, William Henry, ed, History of Alexander, Union, and Pulaski Counties, IL (1883; reprinted 1987 by Genealogical Society of Southern Illinois) Ramsey, Robert W. Carolina Cradle. Settlement of the Northwest Carolina Frontier 1747-1762 (Chapel Hill, NC, 1964); Roberts, Charles, History of Lehigh County, PA (Allentown, PA, 1914); Rowan County Courthouse Records (wills, land deeds) Rumple, Rev. Jethro, A History of Rowan County, NC (Baltimore, 1974); Salisbury, NC Public Library, Salisbury, NC (McCubbins Collection, marriage, and church records) Sipes, C. Hale, Fort Ligonier and Its Times (NY, 1971); Strassburger, Ralph B. Pennsylvania German Pioneers. . .Lists of Arrivals in Philadelphia 1727-1808. Two volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Pub Co., 1966; U.S. Archives, Washington, DC (for US Census and military records) Yoder, Don, ed., Pennsylvania German Immigrants 1709-1786. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1980 (Contains lists from the Palatinate and other provinces).' [Konrad Dillow], Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow: A History of the North Carolina Dillow Line [n.p; n.d.]. Burial: (w.d. 9 Nov 1797) of Germany - also No. 332 between 1772 and 1797.1 Michael was listed as the head of a family on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina. Michael Dillo [sic] 1 male over 16; 1 male under 16; 4 females.5 Michael was listed as Jacob Dillow's neighbor on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Jacob Dillo 1 male over 16
Michael Dillo 1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, 4 females.6 Michael was probably a free white male, age 45 or over, in Peter Dillow's household on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Peter Dillow 1 male 0-9 (David 3); 1 male 16-25; 1 male 45 and over (Michael Hartman) ; 1 female 0-9 (child ?); 1 female 16-25 (wife Susannah); 1 female 45 and older (Anna Margareth mother.)7 Michael Hartman Dillow died in 1805 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.1 He died in 1805 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.1 He was buried at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 He was German Reformed.1

Family

Anna Margareth Holtzhauser b. 11 Apr 1737, d. 1812
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. xix.
  3. [S841] Early Records Dillon Dillow, online http://web.archive.org/web/20090413124125/http://…
  4. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 1.
  5. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1790 United States Federal Census
    about Michael Dillo
    Name:
    Michael Dillo

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

  6. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Jacob Dillo
    Township: Not Stated
    County: Rowan
    State: North Carolina
    Year: 1790
    Roll: M637_7
    Page: 177
    Image: 0524.
  7. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Jacob Dillow
    Name:
    Dillow, Jacob

    Township:
    Salisbury

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

Anna Margareth Holtzhauser1

F, b. 11 April 1737, d. 1812
FatherCasper Holtzhauser1 b. s 1708, d. Feb 1785
MotherAnna Margaretha Wiand1 b. 11 Apr 1712, d. 4 May 1783
     Anna Margareth Holtzhauser was born in 1737 at Pennsylvania.1 She was baptized on 11 April 1737 at New Goshenhoppen German Reformed Church, Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania; On 11 Apr 1737,Anna Margareth Holshouser, daughter of Casper and Margaretha Holshouser was baptized in the New Goshenhoppen German Reformed Church, Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.2 She was Housewife.1 Anna Margareth Holtzhauser was also known as Anna Margaretha Margaret Holshouser.1 She married Michael Hartman Dillow at Pennsylvania in 1754.1 As of 1754,her married name was Dillow.1 Anna Margareth Holtzhauser lived; Pa., N.C.1 Michael, Anna, Michael, Jacob, Hannah, Mary and Margaret immigrated, between 1769 and 1771. Destination: an unknown place .3 Anna Margareth Holtzhauser was census 1790 on 2 August 1790 at Rowan County, North Carolina; Michael Dillo [sic] 1 male over 16; 1 male under 16; 4 females.4 Anna was probably a free white female, age 45 or over, in Peter Dillow's household on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Peter Dillow 1 male 0-9 (David 3); 1 male 16-25; 1 male 45 and over (Michael Hartman) ; 1 female 0-9 (child ?); 1 female 16-25 (wife Susannah); 1 female 45 and older (Anna Margareth mother.)5 Anna was probably a free white female, age 45 or over, in Peter Dillow's household on the 1810 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; Peter Delow [sic] 1 male under 10; 1 male 10-16; 1 male 16-26; 2 females under 10; 1 female 16-26 (Susannah); 1 female 45 and over.6 Anna Margareth Holtzhauser died in 1812 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina.1 She was buried at Rowan County, North Carolina.1 She was German Reformed.1

Family

Michael Hartman Dillow b. c 1730, d. 1805
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, p. xix.
  3. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 1.
  4. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, 1790 United States Federal Census
    about Michael Dillo
    Name:
    Michael Dillo

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

  5. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Jacob Dillow
    Name:
    Dillow, Jacob

    Township:
    Salisbury

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.
  6. [S64] 1810 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1810 United States Federal Census
    about Peter Delow
    Name:
    Peter Delow

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

Jacob Dillow1

M, b. 1757, d. circa 1826
FatherMichael Hartman Dillow1 b. c 1730, d. 1805
MotherAnna Margareth Holtzhauser1 b. 11 Apr 1737, d. 1812
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID FC7BABA116117B46A550CF3F38A76C9D963A. Jacob Dillow was born in 1757 at Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania; Michael Hartman and Anna Margareth, then about 22 years of age, had a son Jacob Dillow, believe to have been born teir second child in about 1757, baptized in that same church (New Goshenhoppen Germn Reformed Church, Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, PA) on 4 Nov 1959 [sic] - Dillow Family Vl. 1, p. xxxix.2,3,4 He was Farmer.1 Michael, Anna, Michael, Jacob, Hannah, Mary and Margaret immigrated, between 1769 and 1771. Destination: an unknown place .5 Jacob Dillow 'We first hear of Jacob in Rowan County NC when he bought 196 acres of his father's land on May 2, 1788. In the 1790, 1800, and 1810 census listings he appeared as head of household. ON Feb. 10, 1812, he was appointed to a panel to review progress on road under construction. He was several times summoned as a grand and petit jury member in Rowan County. ON Feb. 10, 1812 [August 20, 1816 acc to 'Apprenticeship and Guardianship Cases, as listed on p. 17 of [Konrad Dillow], Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow: A History of the North Carolina Dillow Line [n.p; n.d.].], he was appointed guardian for Amy Shuman, orphaned daughter of John Shum an. John's widow, Rachael (b Cauble) was married in Rowan County to Jacob's nephew Michael Dillow on Sept. 18, 1815. Jacob sold his land in Rowan cty, NC on Aug 28, 1818. On Oct 31, 1818 he purchased from Samuel Hunsaker in UCI 160 acres of land (SE 1/4 Sec 13 T13S R2W) located some three miles south of Jonesboro, just west of Route #127. This purchase was made probably soon after Jacob's arrival in UCI. It is believed that Jacob's dau Susannah, her husband John, and their infant son Paul made the journey from NC with Jacob and his family. Jacob likely made his home in a log cabin located on the east half of his newly purchaed land in UCI. Jacob was summoned for grand jury duty in UCI for the spring term of 1824. After Jacob d intestate in 1826, his estate was administered by his eldest son Peter and his son-in-law John Dillow. It was the first Dillow probate case in UCI. Survving him were his widow Susannah and all his children, named in the probate papers in whiat is believed ot be the order of their birth: Elizabeth, Susannah, Peter, John, Jacob Jr., Solomon, Henry, Margaret, and Anna. There was no real estate inventory. There is the usual listing of accounts owed to and by the estate, and a detailed list of items sold at pubic auction--probably the most interesting item in the prbate file. It included livestock, grain, farm machinery and implements, and household items. Also included were matters of distribution to heirs. ON behalf of his wife, Amy (Shuman) Clutts, Peter Clutts was given $132.00 as settlement for Amy's interest in the estate of her father John Shuman. Through a series of sales and exchanges during the years after Jacob's death, his estate ended up in the hands of two of his sons- Peter, who got the west half, and Jacob, Jr., who got the east half. Today, on several acres of land Jacob owned, is to be found an impressive stand of near-virgin forest, (generally hardwood trees like hickory, oak, beech) believed to date from the time of the New Madrid earthquake of 1811.'--Konrad Dillow. Paul Dillow (letter of 9-11-90) says St. John's Cem. burial 'not certain, but almost sure,' and that 'he now has a memory stone.' abstracts of deeds involving Dillow Land transactions (from the McCubbins Collection in the Salisbury Public Library): Book 11, page 442: May 2, 1788- Michael Hartman Dillo and wife Ann Margaret let Henry Fulwider (sic) (all of Rowan Co., NC), ahve 196 acres on the waters of Davis's Branch on both sides of Dutch Second Creek, beginning on the north side of Davis's Branch on the corner of the original tract, at a post oak, going south, crossing said Branch and said Creek in all 67 chains and 70 links to a hickory on the corner of Jacob Dillow, north 33 chains and 50 links to a small white oak east 10 chains to a small black oak north 33 chains and 5 links to a stake in the old line, then east to the beginning for 200 pounds wit. by Christopher Bernard and Jacob Dillow and proved by the latter in May Court 1788 (The deed was recorded May 10. This is one third of the 589 acres owned by MHD. Jacob Dillow was MHD's second son. See MHD will. Book 11, page 444: May 2, 1788- Michael Hartman Dillo and wife Ann Margaret (probably Germans) let Jacob Dillow of Rowan Co., NC have 196 acres on the waters of Dutch Second Creek, beginning on the corner of Henry Fullwider (sic) at a hickory on the line of the old tract, going north 53 chains and 50 links to a stake in the old line, west with the old line 36 chains and 50 links to a large rock on the north side of Davis's Branch, south crossing the old tract, 67 chains to a stake near a large black oak and a small Spanish oak on a road, then east to the beginning for 100 pounds, witnessed by Christopher Bernhard & Henry Fullenwider and proved by the later in May 1788. (This land, sold by MHD to his son Jacob, was one third of the 589 acres he purchased in 1772. The remaining third of MHD's land was the portion of the land willed to his son Peter in 1797). . .marriage bonds of record in Rowan County. . Jacob Dillow. .Susannah Shewman. .Apr 14, 1792. . Adam x Powles [&] Charles Caldwell, Bondsman & Witness. . . .Jacob Dillow, also MHD's son, served as bondsman for Christopher Lyerle and Polly Trexler Apr. 11, 1818; and for Jacob Shuman and Teny Earnhart on Apr 27, 1815.. . In 1817-1818, most male descendants of MHD migrated to Union County, Illinois. With them went also a great many females. The complete families of MHD's sons Jacob and Peter, and those of his grandsons John and Michael, went. So did Jacob's two married daughters and their families. Also included was Mary, granddaughter of MHD through his eldest son Michael. None of MHD's daughters migrated to Union County nor did two of the daughters of Michael, MHD's eldest son. However, at least three of the children of Adam and Mary (Dillow) Powles did join the Union County group. . . It seems a safe assumption that the prospect of cheap land of better quality than that in Noth Carolina was the chief lure which led the Dillows, and many other families of Rowan County, to seek a new home in Union County, IL. They came at the very time of the county's birth and the admission of Illinois to the Union. Whatever the motivation, a great deal of courage and determination was required for the arduous task of moving and setting up homes n a vigin territory. The INdian problem, as it was called, had been over for less than a decade and conditions must have been truly pioneer. For an appreciation of the difficulty of the journey, the reader is advised to read Kincaid's Wilderness Road, or take a drive along the route they followed. To get a feel for the Union County to which they came, Perrin's History of Alexander, Union, and Pulaski Counties is recommended. This writer does not know exactly what route the immigrants followed from Rowan County to the Cumberland Gap, but from the gap to the present site of Louisville they followed the Daniel Boone Wilderness Road, which in fact was the only existing road across Kentucky at that time. According to Perrin, the immigrants came from this site down the Ohio River on barges or rafts to Fort Massac, thence generally overland to Union County. It was a journey of some two months and, for mutual aid and protection, families often traveled in parties. It appears that the Dillows came to Union County in two or three groups, during the summers of 1817 and 1818. Michael Dillow (1790-1836), son of Michael Dillow who was MHD's oldest son, was the first to buy land in Union County. After his services in the war of 1812, Michael had married Rachael Shuman. ON May 5, 1817, he sold to George Kessler 100 acres of land he had acquired on Dutch Creek, in Rowan County, for $200.00. This sale came nearly three months after Michael had bought (February 8, 1817) for $160.00 from the public domain (records for purchases of public lands can be found in the Illinois State Archives in Springfield, IL. All deeds to such land, not previously in private hands, bear the signature of the President of the United States) 80 acres located some two and a half miles west of the present town of Dongola, in Union County. Organ Church Records show that Michael, along with his brother John and his sister Mary, took communion on Whitsunday, 1817. It seems this may have been a leave-taking occasion before Michael came to Union County in the summer of 1817. Apparently his wife Rachel stayed behind, for it was she who in August registered the deed for the transaction made on May 5, according to court minutes. Peter Dillow (1773-1855), uncle of Michael Dillow, and the youngest son of MHD, was the second to buy land in Union County. ONe September 9, 1818 he sold to Jacob Trexler the land he inherited from MHD and an additional 173 acres he had acquired on Panther Creek, date unknown. Nearly a year before this sale, he ahd bought on November 27, 1817, two 160-acre tracts in Union County, one on the section of land where the Anna Mental Health Center now stands, and another at the village of Mountain Glen, just west of the present town of Cobden. It seems likely that Peter came to Union County, either in the summer of 1817 or the summer of 1818. Perrin says he arrived 'about 1818.' Peter's older brother Jacob (1759-1826) sold his North Carolina land on August 28, 1818, also to Jacob Trexler, and purchased in Union County on October 31, 1818 160 acres south of Jonesboro, just west of route #127, land now owned by Melvin Dean. Jacob probably came to Illinois during the summer of 1818, along with John and Susanah, his daughter and son-in-law, their infant son Paul, and a number of persons whose identities we do not know. It seems likely that Peter Dillow (1797-1880), Jacob's son, came in Jacob's party. Perrin says that Peter arrived on October 23, 1818. John owned no land in Rowan County. On Janaury 10, 1819 he bought from the federal domain 80 acres adjoining land purchased by his brother Michael in February, 1817. John's was the last Dillow land purchase in Union County until after the death of Jacob in 1826. On the basis of facts just presented, it is believed that Michael established the first Dillow home in Union County, Peter the second, Jacob the third, and John and Susannah the fourth. . . 2. Dillow Families in Union County in 1820 To the above-mentioned heads of household, another was added before census time in 1820, that of Peter Dillow (1797-1880), eldest son of Jacob. On Dec. 18, 1819 he married Mary 'Polly' Lentz, daughter of Peter Lentz, who had already brought his family to Union County about 1818. Before the close of the calendar year 1820 still another household was added when Samuel Dillow (1800-1864), son of MHD's son Peter, married Margaret Lingle. Thus we have, at the end of the year 1820, six Dillow families numbering 35 persons. They would increase to some 60 families and over 300 persons by 1900. The patriarch of this group was Jacob who was about 60, not young for that time, particularly for a pioneer in a near-wilderness frontier. Jacob's son-in-law and nephew, John, was 28, his nephew Michael about 30, Jacob's son Peter, the newlywed, was 23. Springville, located between Mill Creek and Jonesboro, was the settlement closest to these families. Mill Creek was about 10 years old. Dongola and Anna would not exist for another three decades. Jonesboro had just been laid out in January and February of 1818. Jacob's brother Peter was about 47 years old in 1820. He and his sons are said to have cleared much of the land where Anna-Jonesboro now stands. The descendants of Jacob and John Dillow were (and still are) to be found generally south and east of Jonesboro and Anna. The descendants of Jacob's brother Peter settled generally noth and east of these towns. An old map of Union County shows old towns and post offices some of which no longer exist. Before the coming of the Illinois Central Railroad in the mid 1850's, and even later, Willard's Landing on the Mississippi River was a very important location. For communication, as well as for the movement of goods and people, the Mississippi as then a very important link with the outside world. Virtually all Union County farm produce, timber, and other products reached the market by means of the river. 3. Early Churches During the first decades in Union County, almost all of MHD's descendants affiliated with either the Lutheran or the German Reformed Church. IN 1816 the Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. John's was organized, and in the year 1822-23 a log chrch was built for the joint use of the Lutheran and German Reformed Congregations, near the line which divides the old cemetery from the new addition. It was described as 18 feet by 24 feet and tall enough for a balcony, which was never put in. It was a simple, rustic structure. Tradition has it that before this building was erected, worship and prayer services were held in the home of John Miller and perhaps others. On February 16, 1824, John Miller deeded to 'Elders and Deacons of the Lutheran and German Reformed Churches' about one and one half acres of land for the purpose of building a meeting house. Additional land was deeded to both congregations in 1827 by Jacob Hileman Sr. In 1839, the St. John's Congregations were deeded two acres by Jacob and Margaret (Dillow) Miller, and on this land a second house of worship was built jointly by the two congregations in 1855-56. With numerous additions and remodeling, this is the building which still stands. St. John's began as a small mission olf the North Carolna Synod. Early pastors were either missionaries of the synod or circuit clergy who served more than one congregation. Such a missionary was the Rev. Daniel Scherer, previously referred to. His period of service at St. John's was 1832-1835. Beginning about 1830, a log church was erected for the Casper Congregation, located about two miles north of Anna. A frame building was built in 1847. Both Lutheran and German Reformed congregations used this church as well, and the same pastor often served both Casper and St. John's. Samuel Dillow, son of Peter Dillow (1773-1855), was on the building committee for the Casper church. The Mt. Pisgah Church, near the Union and Pulaski County border, was organized in 1853. Jacob C. Dillow, son of Peter Dillow (1797-1880), was a church elder at the time. In the 1850's and 1860's the first church of Dongola and Mt. Moriah in Anna were organized. A paronage was erected in Jonesboro in 1850 on land donated by Willis Willard. The St. John's Cemetery, one of the oldest and best kept in the county, has been very much used by the descendants of MHD's son Jacob Dillow (1759-1826). Jacob may himself be buried there, though no rock has been found. In later years, the cemeteries in Dongola, Jonesboro, and Anna have been used by Jacob's descendants. . . .In Union County the North Carolina Dillows had found a home. They would be there in force 170 years later. It is often forgotten, however, how trying the early years must have been. During the first generation of the Dillow presence there, Union County was an almost wholly undeveloped area, given over to subsistence farming. Conditions were well suited for the pioneer. There was an abundance of timber at hand, for building log houses, barns, and other farm buildings and for providing winter firewood. The forests were well stocked with game. The soil was sufficiently productive for subsistence purposes. An abundant supply of water was at hand. Clearing the land, building, planting, and harvesting were core activities around which family life revolved. The stuggle to provide food, clothing, and shelter was constant. In such a setting, Dillow boys grew up, married, and generally either rented or bought land, usually within a very short distance from their parents' home. Dillow girls generally married farmers of Union or a neighboring county. Transportation and communication were by horse, wagon, and on foot. Families were generally large. Aside from the church, social life was very restricted. Illiteracy rates were very high. Intermittently, a few subscription schools existed, but educational opportunity was extremely limited. Mobility of the Dillow population was slight. The writer knows of only two cases during the period 1820-1860 in which Dillow heads of household moved out of the county. The Oregon Trail movement apparently bypassed the Dillows. Home labor provided for most food and clothing needs. Sturdy blacksmiths provided most farm tools and wagons. It appears, however, that living conditions were less austere by 1855 than they were in 1820. Two of the four original first generation log houses had been replaed by improved log houses which were later to get wooden siding. One of these two homes still stands; the other stood until about 1900. One home was replaced by a two-story brick home, which still stands. In 1855 Peter Dillow, the last of the Dillows who had established homes in Union County in 1817-18, died. Jacob had died in 1826. Michael had moved out of Union County in 1833, to do more pioneering in Macon and Piatt Counties. John had died in 1845. A more important signal of the end of the pioneer period, however, was the coming of the Illinois Central railroad in 1855. This railroad line, and the Mobile and Ohio which was to follow, opened markets for Union County farm produce in the new and rapidly growing towns and cities, like Chicago and St. Louis. The cities in turn would make available to rural areas a greater range of consumer goods. John Deere's plow and other improved farm machinery were about to replace less effective farm tools. McCormick's binder would soon replace the scythe and cradle. After the Civil War the one-room rural school would bring free and compulsory elementary education to rural areas. The day of the pioneer had passed. As in Rown County, North Carolina, Dillow pioneers in Union County were subject to summons by the county for performance of civic functions such as jury duty, road construction (as supervisor or worker), and service as witneses. Court records of the Union County Commissioners 1818-1826 showed that all adult Dillow males during this service, excepting Samuel, Solomon, David, and Jacob Jr. served on at least one occasion on either a grand or petit jury. All except Jacob Sr. and perhaps Jacob Jr. served on at least one occasion a road worker or supervisor. Michael served as a witness and on a bond security matter. 7. A Look Forward During the Civil War, 16 soldiers bearing the Dillow name, all of them descendants of MHD, and all from Union County, fought for the North. Of these, 4 were killed in action, 6 died of disease, and 3 received disability discharges. Still other MHD descendants through female lines, and husbands of female descendants, also did military service for the Union cause. A number of MHD descendants, through Margaret (Dillow) Lyerle, and perhaps through other daughters who remaiend in North Carolina, did service for the Confederacy. Most of those who served for the Union were enrolled in the 109 Regiment Illinois Infantry, whose members were transferred to the 11th Regiment, Illinois Infantry in the spring of 1863. After the Civil WAr and continuing through World War I there followed a long period of agricultural expansion, made possible through expanded markets for agricultural products and the inroduction of vastly improved farm machinery. This was the heyday of farming through the use of horse and mule power. It was the era of the threshing machine, powered by the steam engine. From around the turn of the century, the buggy or the surrey were replacing the wagon for Sunday and pleasure travel. Daily mail delivery came to most rural areas. Towns and villages thrived. Crossroad hamlets like Springville and Balcom would boast a post office, a depot, and a store or so. Mill Creek would include two blacksmith shops, a flour and saw mill, a half dozen or more retail stores, a hotel, four churches, a depot, postoffice, barbar shop, and doctor's office. This was a period also during which free compulsory education and the rural one-room scool came into their own. The one-room school would continue until around 1945 when elementary school consolidation caused it to pass generally out of existence. Literacy rates rose sharply, so that illiteracy became the exception rather than the rule. By 1915 or 1920, high schools began to become available to rural families. By the 1930's high school attendance would become quite common, and soon thereafter college attendance. By the 1970's and 1980's, the teachers' college in Carbondale, in Jackson County, with an enrollment of a thousand or so students in the early 1930's, would become the Southern Illinois University, with enrollments in excess of 20,000 students. Mobility of the North Carolina Dillows was slight until the age of the automobile, during the 1920's and 1930's. Michael and Rachael (Shuman) Dillow had left Union County for Macon (later Piatt) County in 1833-34. By the 1860's and 1870's a number of Dillow descendants had gone to neighboring areas such as Alexander, Johnson, and Pulaski Counties. More would do the same before the 1920's. In the 1870's, some of the children of Solomon and Susannah (Barringer) Dillow would migrate to Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas where numerous descendants are to be found today. Likewise the children of Ephraim Dillow, a Civil War casualty, found their way to Oklahoma and Texas where many of their descendants still live. Arond 1900, Charles Washington and Arminda (Dillow) Mowery went to the Houston, Texas area. About 1910, Jasper Mowery would move his family to the state of Washington. For the most part, however, up to 1920-1930 the Dillows stuck pretty close to Union County and earned a living through farming or farm-related occupations. In the several decades after 1920, changes in Southern Illinois, as in the United States generally, have taken place at a dizzying pace. The mule and the horse gave way to the auto, the tractor, and other machinery powered by the gasoline or diesel engine. Electricity has lighted up and brought power machinery to town and country alike. The airplane and the truck have caused greatly decreased dependence on the railroads and the rivers. The telephone and TV have broken down the traditional isolation of rural areas. Throughout these and other changes, the North Carolina Dillows are still abundant in the area where they settled following their arrival in Southern Illinois in 1817-1818. A scattering of them may be found in almost any of the United States. Those who live outside Union County or neighboring areas, however, are not likely to be farmers. Still, Union County remains easily the place where the greatest concentration of North Carolina Dillows make their homes today. During the 1980's over 60 Dillow homes are to be found in Union County. Over 30 Dillows in the county are still listed as landownes. A few cultivate some of the same land tilled by their great or great great grandfathers. Some own only a few acres of land; some operate the traditional one-family farms of perhaps 100-200 acres; some own or rent large tracts and are agri-business operators. Bibliography 1. Illinois County Records (birth, death, marriage, land, and probate records): Alexander County, Cairo, IL; Johnson County Vienna, IL; Macon County, Decatur, IL; Piatt County, Monticello, IL; Pulaski County, Mound City, IL; Union County, Jonesboro, IL (add County Commissioners' court records). 2. Illinois State Archives, Springfield, IL. 3. Jackson, Ernest H., compiler. Marriages of Union County, IL, 1818-1880. Heritage House, Thomson, IL 1977. 4. Kincaid, Robert L. The Wilderness Road. Middleboro, KY, 1973. 5. Macon County Marriage Records. Dacatur Genealogical Society, Decatur, IL 1967. 6. Morgan, Jessie B. The Good LIfe in Piatt County. Moline, IL 1968. 7. Perrin, Wm H. History of Alexander, Union, and Pulaski Counties. Reprinted 1987 by Genealogy Society of Southern Illinois. 8. Piatt, Emma C. History of Piatt County. Chicago, 1883. 9. Piatt County Illinois Marriage Records 1841-1853 and Cemetery Records. Urbana, IL, 1962. 10. Unites State Archives, WAshington, DC (military records). 11. United State Census 1820-1850.' [Konrad Dillow], Descendants of Michael Hartman Dillow: A History of the North Carolina Dillow Line [n.p; n.d.], p. 14 -32. between 1788 and 1826.1 Jacob was listed as the head of a family on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina. Jacob Dillo 1 male over 16
Michael Dillo 1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, 4 females.6 He married Susannah Shuman at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 14 April 1792.1 Jacob Dillow lived; PA, NC, IL.1 Jacob was listed as the head of a family on the 1800 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina. Jacob Dillow 1 male 0-9 (Peter); 1 male 25-44; 3 females 10-15 (probably mistake for 3 female 0-9 - Elizabeth 7, Susannah 5, and an unknown female); 1 female 25-44 (wife Susannah).7 Jacob was listed as the head of a family on the 1810 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina, same page as Peter but 7 familes down; Jacob Dillo 3 males under 10; 2 males 10-16; 1 male 45 and over; 2 females 16-26; 1 female 45 & over (Susannah)..8 He died circa 1826 at Springville, Union County, Illinois.3 He was buried at Saint Johns Lutheran Cemetery, Dongola, Union County, Illinois; no stone found.1 He was FC7BABA116117B46A550CF3F38A76C9D963A.9 He was German Reformed.1

Family

Susannah Shuman b. 1775, d. 1839
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S596] Linda Lamonte Knopke, July 2004; uploaded May 2004, sources available upon email request e-mail address.
  3. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol II (Jacob) Book 1 p. 1.
  4. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael Sr) p. xxxix.
  5. [S844] Paul Dean Dillow, Dillow Family, Vol 1 (Michael) p. 1.
  6. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com, Name: Jacob Dillo
    Township: Not Stated
    County: Rowan
    State: North Carolina
    Year: 1790
    Roll: M637_7
    Page: 177
    Image: 0524.
  7. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Jacob Dillow
    Name:
    Dillow, Jacob

    Township:
    Salisbury

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

  8. [S64] 1810 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1810 United States Federal Census
    about Peter Delow
    Name:
    Peter Delow

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.
  9. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.

Susannah Shuman1

F, b. 1775, d. 1839
FatherGeorge Shuman1 b. c 1745, d. bt 1780 - 1800
Motherwife ?1 b. c 1750, d. bt 1780 - 1810
     Unrecognized GEDCOM data: Unknown GEDCOM tag: _UID F4272211A31EDC428CF1D90FF62BFB06B4C7. Susannah Shuman was born in 1775 at North Carolina.1 She was Housewife; 9 children.1 Susannah Shuman was also known as Susannah Shewman.1 Susannah was probably a free white female in an unknown person 's household on the 1790 Census at Rowan County, North Carolina; George Shueman [sic] 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, 4 females; close by is "Christian Shooeman" [sic].2 She married Jacob Dillow at Rowan County, North Carolina, on 14 April 1792.1 As of 14 April 1792,her married name was Dillow.1 Susannah Shuman lived; NC, IL.1 She was census 1800 on 1 August 1800 at Rowan County, North Carolina; Jacob Dillow 1 male 0-9 (Peter); 1 male 25-44; 3 females 10-15 (probably mistake for 3 female 0-9 - Elizabeth 7, Susannah 5, and an unknown female); 1 female 25-44 (wife Susannah.)3 She was census 1810 on 1 August 1810 at Rowan County, North Carolina; same page as Peter but 7 familes down; Jacob Dillo 3 males under 10; 2 males 10-16; 1 male 45 and over; 2 females 16-26; 1 female 45 & over (Susannah.)4 She died in 1839 at Springville, Union County, Illinois.1 She was buried at Saint Johns Lutheran Cemetery, Dongola, Union County, Illinois.1 She Military Record: None 'After the death of Jacob Dillow in 1826, his widow Susannah maintained her household until her deathin the 1830's.' -- Konrad Dillow.1 She was F4272211A31EDC428CF1D90FF62BFB06B4C7.5 She was German Reformed.1

Family

Jacob Dillow b. 1757, d. c 1826
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S62] 1790 census, online www.ancestry.com.
  3. [S63] 1800 US census, online www.ancestry.com, 1800 United States Federal Census
    about Jacob Dillow
    Name:
    Dillow, Jacob

    Township:
    Salisbury

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.

  4. [S64] 1810 US Census, online www.ancestry.com, 1810 United States Federal Census
    about Peter Delow
    Name:
    Peter Delow

    County:
    Rowan

    State:
    North Carolina.
  5. [S7] James Lance, Ancestors and Descandants of Bastian & Dewalt Lentz,.

Casper Holtzhauser1

M, b. say 1708, d. February 1785
     Casper Holtzhauser was born say 1708 at Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.2 Casper Holtzhauser was also known as Casper Holshouser.1 Casper Holtzhauser was also known as Casper Holtzahausen Holtzahausen in Jacob Fisher will.1 Born about 1700 in Germany, Casper married in Pennsylvania to Margaret ______, born about 1704 in Germany.

Casper is listed as having made an oath of allegiance to Pennsylvania on 17 Aug 1731. Casper bought land in Montgomery Co, PA, which is near Valley Forge, PA. He later settled in Upper Milford Township, Northampton Co, PA. His last move was to Upper Hanover Township, Philadelphia Co, PA, where he made a will, 12 Aug 1784, stating his intention to move to North Carolina to live with his children. Casper died in February 1785 in Upper Hanover Township, having never completed his move to North Carolina.

His will names his children:
Johannes Jacob
Anna Margareth
Andreas (Andrew)
Michael
Catharina

From "A Casper 'Holtzhouser' Holshouser Genealogy" by Dr. Grace Duff.3 He immigrated on 16 August 1731 to Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; Casper Holtzhauser arrived in Pennsylvania 16 Aug 1731 on the ship "Samuel," Hugh Peirch, Master, from Rotterdam, last from Cowes - inhabitant from the Palatinate, according to Rupp, "Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants."4 Casper immigrated, on 16 August 1731. Destination: an unknown place .3 Casper Holtzhauser and an unknown person took the oath of allegiance on 17 August 1731 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; Casper is listed as having made an oath of allegiance to Pennsylvania on 17 Aug 1731.3 He married Anna Margaretha Wiand at Pennsylvania say 1732.4 Casper bought 183 acres of land in Lehigh and Milford Counties in PA from Richard and Thomas Penn (sons of William Penn) in 1760. In 1770 he sold his land to his son Andrew. In 1771 Andrew sold the land to his older brother Jacob. CAsper and Margaretha had three sons and two daughters. - Rowan County Heritage, #504. between 1760 and 1771 at Milford County, Pennsylvania.5 Casper Holtzhauser left a will on 12 August 1784 at Upper Hanover Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; His last move was to Upper Hanover Township, Philadelphia Co, PA, where he made a will, 12 Aug 1784, stating his intention to move to North Carolina to live with his children. Casper died in February 1785 in Upper Hanover Township, having never completed his move to North Carolina. His will names his children:
Johannes Jacob
Anna Margareth
Andreas (Andrew)
Michael
Catharina.3 He witnessed Upper Hanover Township became part of Montgomery County 10 Sep 1784 on 10 September 1784 at Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.6 He died in February 1785 at Upper Hanover Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.1 He was occup1 Farmer.7

Family

Anna Margaretha Wiand b. 11 Apr 1712, d. 4 May 1783
Children

Citations

  1. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  2. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Shuping Family Tree.
  3. [S842] Hulshizer Heritage, online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hulshizer/…
  4. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Holthouser Family Tree.
  5. [S268] Katherine Sanford Petrucelli, Rowan County Heritage.
  6. [S843] Montgomery County (PA), online http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montgomery_County,_Pennsylvania.
  7. [S596] Linda Lamonte Knopke, July 2004; uploaded May 2004, sources available upon email request e-mail address.

Anna Margaretha Wiand1

F, b. 11 April 1712, d. 4 May 1783
     Anna Margaretha Wiand was also known as Anna Margaretha Bingham.2 She was 3 sons, 2 daus.2 She was born on 11 April 1712 at Germany.1 She married Casper Holtzhauser at Pennsylvania say 1732.3 As of say 1732,her married name was Holtzhauser.3 Her married name was Holshouser.2 Anna Margaretha Wiand died on 4 May 1783 at Upper Hanover Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, at age 71.2 She was buried at Great Swamp Burial Grounds, Lower Milford Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.4 She maiden name Bingham in Heritage #507.2

Family

Casper Holtzhauser b. s 1708, d. Feb 1785
Children

Citations

  1. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Shuping Family Tree.
  2. [S1] Rolph and McMillin Ancestors [old Reunion file], 3/11/2002.
  3. [S47] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, Holthouser Family Tree.
  4. [S596] Linda Lamonte Knopke, July 2004; uploaded May 2004, sources available upon email request e-mail address.